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Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks

Mon 07 Jun 2004

Quick Links - 2004 06 07

Last update: 07/06/04; 10:16:54 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Scott S. Lawton: Frontier as Open Source The beginning of a new era?: I'd love to hear from others -- fogeys or not. I don't have a simple way to allow comments here, so please chime in on one of the threads below.
  • Hamish Sanderson: appscript: Appscript allows MacPython users on OS X to manipulate scriptable applications from ordinary Python scripts. [via Karl Dubost]

Politics

  • Robert Parry [In the 1980s, as a correspondent for the Associated Press and Newsweek, Robert Parry broke many of the stories now known as the Iran-Contra Affair. His latest book is Lost History. ]: Not Vietnam but Central America: Though U.S.-backed armies and paramilitary forces eventually quelled the leftist peasant rebellions, the cost in blood was staggering. The death toll in El Salvador was estimated at about 70,000 people. In Guatemala, the number of dead reached about 200,000, including what a truth commission concluded was a genocide against the Mayan populations in Guatemala's highlands. The muted press coverage that the U.S. news media has given these atrocities as they have come to light over the years also showed the residual strength of the "perception management" employed by the Reagan administration. For instance, even when the atrocities of former Guatemalan dictator Efrain Rios Montt are mentioned, as they were in the context of his defeat in Guatemala's Nov. 9 presidential elections, the history of Reagan's warm support for Rios Montt is rarely, if ever, noted by the U.S. press. While the slaughter of the Mayans was underway in the 1980s, Reagan portrayed Gen. Rios Montt and the Guatemalan army as victims of disinformation spread by human rights groups and journalists. Reagan huffily discounted reports that Rios Montt's army was eradicating hundreds of Mayan villages. On Dec. 4, 1982, after meeting with Rios Montt, Reagan hailed the general as "totally dedicated to democracy" and declared that Rios Montt's government had been "getting a bum rap." Reagan also reversed President Jimmy Carter's policy of embargoing military equipment to Guatemala over its human rights abuses. Carter's human rights embargoes represented one of the few times during the Cold War when Washington objected to the repression that pervaded Central American society. -> For more from Parry, see consortiumnews.com.

10:21AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Fri 28 May 2004

Quick Links - 2004 05 28

Last update: 28/05/04; 09:33:23 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • amfphp.org: AMFPHP An Open-Source Alternative for Flash Remoting : Flash remoting for PHP enables objects in PHP to become objects in actionscript, almost magically! AMFPHP takes care of all the data-type conversions, serialization, and other client-server details. This provides a great way of connecting rich media clients with data and logic living on the server. While at the same time allowing designers to design and programmers to program.
  • David Sklar: HTML_QuickForm -> Slides; excellent intro to HTML_QuickForm (PHP).
  • Sam Ruby: Détente: So, if you are a tool vendor and would like a little more structure, rigor, and reproducibility, Atom might be a good choice. But if you chose to hold back until Atom is done, that's OK too. However, if you want to do something quick and dirty in RSS 2.0, go for it. Guilt free. It will get you up and running quickly. The key takeaway here is to beware of anybody who preaches one true format or one size fits all. Each format has its strengths. And none of them are going away any time soon. Meanwhile, you can help by spreading the word. The word is détente. RSS 1.0 has a reason to exist. RSS 2.0 has a reason to exist. And Atom has a reason to exist.

9:40AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Thu 20 May 2004

Quick Links - 2004 05 20

Last update: 20/05/04; 09:44:03 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Brent Simmons: RSS Advisory Board, not on: The situation of supporting multiple syndication formats is not new with Atom: Atom is the third major format. The other two are RSS 1.0 and RSS 0.9x/2.0. (I'm speaking in broad terms: I'm well aware of the differences between various versions of RSS.) My point is just that newsreaders have been dealing with multiple formats for a long time.
  • Christopher Allen: Simple Yet Sophisticated Group Page Editing: At the fundamental level, EditThisPagePHP basically just let you remotely edit a single page. There are many situations where existing Wiki or Blog software is too complicated, or imposes too much structure. EditThisPagePHP lets you have total control over the HTML -- you can use sophisticated CSS layouts, or very simple HTML -- the software does not get in the way. Yet in spite of this simplicity, EditThisPagePHP also uses ideas drawn from various Wiki, Blog, and CMS (content management system) technologies. Like Wikis, it supports an edit-this-page button, page history, page diffs, and can email users when pages change. Like Blogs, it supports optional user comments, trackbacks (both send and receive), and delivers two RSS feeds -- one for the current version of the page, and one with diffs. Like a CMS, it supports multiple roles, by default a reader, an editor, and a super-editor -- each with different privileges.
  • Kendall Grant Clark: The Courtship of Atom: All that having been said, I think, as between any lover and its beloved, wooing is better than pressuring. If, as a result of moving into the W3C, Atom's developers find benefits to adopting the RDF model, than that's all to the good. If not, that's fine, too. I will point out that many people's main objection to RDF, that the canonical XML serialization is painful, is less and less trenchant these days. (See, for example, Mark Pilgrim's "Should Atom Use RDF?".) Why? Because, first, there are at least six good alternatives to RDF-XML for serializing RDF models: Notation 3 (aka, N3), NTriples, Turtle, TriG (which is, roughly, Turtle++), TriX, and RXR ("Regular XML RDF"); and, second, because at least two of them are "ordinary" XML vocabularies (TriX and RXR) -- amenable to XSLT transformations, for example. That means that you can do lots of RDF, all the RDF you might ever need or want to do, and never produce or consume the canonical RDF-XML serialization. Yay for alternatives! I suspect that, if there was to be an Atom WG, and were it to adopt the RDF data model and any of these alternative XML syntaxes, that would not only be a good thing for the W3C, but it would benefit RDF and Atom, too. But I know that if an Atom WG were to take a hard look at RDF and its data model, and then to pass politely, it will still be a win for all concerned for Atom to have found a home in the W3C.

9:50AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Mon 17 May 2004

Quick Links - 2004 05 17

Last update: 19/05/04; 20:48:05 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Dave Winer: FAQs about Frontier open source release: What will be released under an open source license? All the source code you need to build the Frontier application on Windows and Macintosh, the core object database, Frontier.root, and the ancillary databases, but not manila.root or radio.root. Several base technologies in Radio may also be released under an open source license, such as upstreaming and the outline-based preferences manager. Basically what's being released is technology, but not applications.
  • Dave Winer comment on Brian Sullivan's Random Musings: The separation, at a legal level, has already taken place. UserLand has a license to use the kernel, but it does not own the kernel. I know it's confusing, but over time it will make more sense, I think.
  • Seth Dillingham: UserLand Planning to Release Frontier's Kernel : I'd need to believe two things. First, that fixing bugs and adding features in the kernel would be a better use of Macrobyte's time than bringing my software to another platform. Second, that changes I make in the kernel source could somehow be put to immediate use in my software, rather than having to wait for a point release from UserLand. What won't work at all is a situation where you still have to buy licenses to Frontier in order to do anything meaningful with the 'open source.' For example, if Frontier is updated so that replacement kernels can be dropped in easily, but you still have to buy the application, it's useless to me. I don't mind contributing improvements to the code, but I won't pay for that "privelege." Whatever the outcome, this is the most interesting news to come out of UserLand in many years, and it gives me an option for the future of some of Macrobyte's software that I hadn't considered before today.
  • Dave Winer: As Good A Time As Any: I am on the board of directors of the company, and I persuaded my fellow board members that it would be in the company's interest to let the kernel develop separately from the products that build on it. And that's what I want to announce today. At some point in the next few months, there will be an open source release of the Frontier kernel.

7:14AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Fri 14 May 2004

Quick Links - 2004 05 14

Last update: 20/05/04; 09:48:00 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Atom Project (Atom Wiki): Atom Project: W3C Working Group and Interest Group : The working group will use experience gained with RSS (variably used as a name by itself and as an acronym for "RDF Site Summary", "Rich Site Summary", or "Really Simple Syndication") as the basis for a standards-track document specifying the model, syntax, and feed format. The feed format and HTTP will be used as the basis of work on a standards-track document specifying the editing protocol. If other submissions are made to the working group under terms accepted by the W3C, the working group may consider them as alternatives, based upon their merits.
  • Matt May: W3C wants Atom: Here are the answers to the FAQ: No, it doesn't have to be RDF. No, it won't have to take ten years to become a standard. No, you don't have to pony up $5,750 a year to become a Member to participate. Yes, it will be royalty-free. (All our new stuff is.) Yes, you can do everything in the public eye. No, some W3C Member company didn't put us up to this. Yes, we can make Atom feeds of our RSS feeds.
  • Joe Gregorio: Google, Atom, SixApart, and Longhorn: It's been a spectacular day for news today, just way too much to break up into separate posts.

9:22AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Wed 07 Apr 2004

Quick Links - 2004 04 07

Last update: 20/05/04; 09:48:07 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Late Night Software Ltd: Property List Tools 1.0: The Property List Tools Scripting Addition allows AppleScript to load and store data Mac OS X Property Lists. The scripting addition allows you to export any AppleScript data structure to a property list.

9:32AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Thu 18 Mar 2004

Quick Links - 2004 03 18

Last update: 20/05/04; 09:48:11 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • developer.apple.com: Reference Library: A comprehensive collection of Apple technical resources, including Documentation, Technical Notes, Sample Code, Technical Q&As, and Release Notes. Each of the links below leads to the resources for a specific topic. Key resources also include Getting Started documents, API references, and cross-references for related topics.

8:00AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Tue 16 Mar 2004

Quick Links - 2004 03 16

Last update: 16/03/04; 08:47:55 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • CocoaMySQL: CocoaMySQL is an application used to manage MySQL databases (locally or over the internet). It lets you add and remove databases and tables, change fields and indexes, view and filter the content of tables, add, edit and remove rows, perform custom queries and dump tables or entire databases. -> Open Source.

comments: 0

8:19AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Mon 15 Mar 2004

Quick Links - 2004 03 14

Last update: 15/03/04; 08:03:30 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • John Lim: PHP5 evolutionary lies : Comrades, I'm sick of hearing that PHP5 is evolutionary. If you believe that PHP5 is evolutionary because it stresses backward compatibility, then try bending over backwards - you'll find that it feels very stressful. PHP5 is not going to go down easily. PHP5 is going to be painful and its going to be revolutionary. Here's why (...)

comments: 0

8:05AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Fri 12 Mar 2004

Quick Links - 2004 03 12

Last update: 12/03/04; 08:48:03 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Late Night Software Ltd: Affrus 1.0: Affrus 1.0 is an integrated Perl editing and debugging environment for Mac OS X. It wraps Perl in a standard, familiar, and intuitive user interface. Affrus is the perfect center for all your Perl development needs on Mac OS X. Whether you're just beginning to experiment with Perl and want an easy way to get your feet wet, or you're a Perl expert wishing to understand and hack into a vast body of existing code, Affrus is for you.

comments: 0

8:49AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Thu 11 Mar 2004

Quick Links - 2004 03 11

Last update: 11/03/04; 08:04:26 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

comments: 0

8:05AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Wed 10 Mar 2004

Quick Links - 2004 03 10

Last update: 10/03/04; 09:16:51 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Andy Lester: The world's two worst variable names: Bad variables are all over the place. Usually it will be something like a short variable used for too long, like $n being used for the duration of an entire subroutine. The programmer might as well have been working in TRS-80 BASIC, where only the first two characters of variable names were significant, and we had to keep a handwritten lookup chart of names in a spiral notebook next to the keyboard. (O'Reilly Network)
  • wxpython.org: Optimizing for Mac OS X: This page contains tips and tricks for making your wxPython application a good OS X citizen.[via "Robert Kaye"]

comments: 0

9:11AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Tue 03 Feb 2004

Quick Links - 2004 02 03

Last update: 03/02/04; 06:53:57 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • John Lim: Here's the comparison of Python and PHP I promised a few weeks ago. : Another look at PHP and Python
  • Pexpect version 0.99 a Pure Python Expect-like module: Pexpect is a pure Python module for spawning child applications; controlling them; and responding to expected patterns in their output. Pexpect works like Don Libes' Expect. Pexpect allows your script to spawn a child application and control it as if a human were typing commands. Pexpect can be used for automating interactive applications such as ssh, ftp, passwd, telnet, etc. It can be used to a automate setup scripts for duplicating software package installations on different servers. It can be used for automated software testing. Pexpect is in the spirit of Don Libes' Expect, but Pexpect is pure Python. Unlike other Expect-like modules for Python, Pexpect does not require TCL or Expect nor does it require C extensions to be compiled. It should work on any platform that supports the standard Python pty module. The Pexpect interface was designed to be easy to use. [via cornerblog]

comments: 0

6:53AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Wed 21 Jan 2004

Quick Links - 2004 01 21

Last update: 21/01/04; 10:48:49 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Bruce Stewart : Why We Turned Off Anonymous Talkbacks: Until today, you could participate in the online discussions on any of our sites anonymously, with no requirements to register, log in anywhere, or otherwise identify yourself. We know many people appreciated the ease with which they could comment on our articles and weblogs, and in many cases anonymous posters had great things to contribute to these discussions. But in the face of dramatically increasing spam and growing abuse of our system, we've now disabled the ability to post comments anonymously. (O'Reilly Network)
  • nyphp.org: PHundamentals: Functions for Storing Data Submitted From a Form and Displaying Data from a Database: In this article we present our best practice for preparing data submitted from a form for use in an SQL query and preparing that data for display in a browser.
  • Jacob D. Cohen: Nopaste: What is a 'nopaste' site? A 'nopaste' site allows people to paste chunks of code for others to view. This is useful for situations such as asking for programming help on IRC, where it is frowned upon to paste chunks of code to the channel or to individual. With a nopaste site, the user pastes his or her code to the site and is given a url to provide to others so they can find the code. What's different about this one? Many nopaste sites have appeared lately, and many of them are quite similar. The nopaste site at RAFB, as far as I can tell, is the only such site that offers syntax highlighting in several languages including C, C++, C#, Java, PHP, and Visual Basic.

comments: 0

10:51AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Mon 19 Jan 2004

Quick Links - 2004 01 19

Last update: 19/01/04; 07:55:33 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Dave Hyatt: XML Error Handling in Web Browsers: The whole reason nearly all Web pages on the Internet are malformed is because browsers let Web page authors get away with it. As long as browsers are permissive in their error handling and recovery, Web authors will continue to produce invalid Web pages, because they won't even have any idea the pages they are authoring are invalid! People in the error recovery camp then suggest ideas like icons in the status bar, or error messages dumped to some obscure console, but the average Web designer isn't going to know or care about validation as long as WinIE displays the Web site adequately. The only way you can make the average Web designer care is to get in his face with the obvious errors. The browser has to make a face and refuse to eat the swill that is being force-fed to it, or the average designer is simply going to shrug and say, "Well, close enough." The crux of the problem with implementing true error recovery is that it must be unambiguous. Every Web browser has to recover from malformed content in precisely the same way. This means that in order for browsers to be tolerant of malformed content, there would have to be a specification regarding how to handle all possible malformations. This is virtually impossible to specify, so why waste time and energy on it when creating well-formed XML files is so ridiculously simple?
  • developer.apple.com: Introduction to Mac OS X Frameworks : Mac OS X makes extensive use of frameworks to distribute shared code and resources, such as the interfaces to the system itself. You can create frameworks of your own to provide shared code and resources to one or more of your company's applications. You can also create frameworks containing class libraries or add-on modules with the intention of distributing them to other developers.

comments: 0

7:58AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Sun 18 Jan 2004

Quick Links - 2004 01 18

Last update: 18/01/04; 14:15:25 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Adam Trachtenberg: Using PHP 5's SimpleXML: SimpleXML is a new and unique feature of PHP 5 that solves these problems by turning an XML document into a data structure you can iterate through like a collection of arrays and objects. It excels when you're only interested in an element's attributes and text and you know the document's layout ahead of time. SimpleXML is easy to use because it handles only the most common XML tasks, leaving the rest for other extensions. [via PHPDeveloper.org] (O'Reilly Network)
  • osdir.com: Interview with OSDir: Interview with Plone: Back from Comdex : OSDir: Why did you guys start Plone? What was your itch? Limi: Zope was lacking a good-looking, functional piece of UI software - the technology was very good, but no consistent, approachable products existed (IMHO, of course). People were struggling with very basic concepts when they started with Zope, something they shouldn't have to do. The itch was customer projects that required content management and we were tired of doing the same things over and over again. Classic tale, really.
  • Sam Ruby: Validate on subscription?: I've thought about Brent's proposed compromise, and to borrow a phrase that is a favorite of Tim Bray, I think that there is a way that 80% of the value can be obtained with 20% of the effort.  Is there really a market requirement to be selectively pedantic on a feed by feed basis?

Politics

  • Zvi Bar'el: Conditions for rejecting negotiations: It has been made clear to us for the past three years that the Arabs don't understand force. The number deaths, suicide bombings and alerts raise the serious suspicion that the Israeli military "educational system" imposed on the Palestinians has failed. Instead of a political process, the Palestinian partners are being offered work permits. The question of whether the Palestinian Authority is responsible for something has long since become irrelevant; Israel is the sole manager of the territories in every sphere. The words "without prior conditions" should be seen as a certain refinement of the phrase, "Please don't bother us now." Israel put forward 14 prior conditions with regard to the road map, and is presenting two prior conditions for a political process with Syria - dismantlement of weapons of mass destruction and an end to support for terrorism - as a prologue to two more prior conditions: no return to the point at which the talks were broken off and no return to the lines of June 4, 1967. (Haaretz)
  • Michael Moore: I'll Be Voting For Wesley Clark/Good-Bye Mr. Bush: Many of you have written to me in the past months asking, "Who are you going to vote for this year?" I have decided to cast my vote in the primary for Wesley Clark. That's right, a peacenik is voting for a general. What a country! I believe that Wesley Clark will end this war. He will make the rich pay their fair share of taxes. He will stand up for the rights of women, African Americans, and the working people of this country. And he will cream George W. Bush.

comments: 0

2:09PM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Thu 15 Jan 2004

Quick Links - 2004 01 15

Last update: 15/01/04; 14:06:22 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • random.org: : Random.org offers true random numbers to anyone on the internet. If you want to know how the numbers are made and what it is that makes them true, read the introduction to randomness and random numbers. -> See the HTTP clients: Python, PHP, Perl, C, etc.

comments: 0

2:05PM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Wed 14 Jan 2004

Quick Links - 2004 01 14

Last update: 14/01/04; 12:38:13 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Georg Bauer: Who is the real bozo here?: Sorry, but this whole "Atom must be parsed strict" - "No, it must be parsed liberal or you are an asshole to your customers" - "No, you are an incompetent bozo" - "No, you are a conspirationist against Atom" helluva should stop right now. It went far enough, you all called each other names, so now go back, play with your toys and let the grownups take over, will you? Please? Hell, it's called social software, not unsocial software, so try to behave at least half way to the expected standard...

comments: 0

12:40PM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Tue 13 Jan 2004

Quick Links - 2004 01 13

Last update: 13/01/04; 09:39:11 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Nick Bradbury: FeedDemon and well-formed Atom feeds: NetNewsWire creator Brent Simmons recently announced that NetNewsWire's future support for Atom will require Atom feeds to be well-formed. Some people aren't too happy about this, claiming that he's applying a double standard that will make Atom appear less useful than RSS. So, I'll add to the stink by stating that my plan is the same as Brent's. FeedDemon will also support Atom, but if an Atom feed isn't well-formed XML, FeedDemon will display an error rather than try to parse it. [via inessential.com]
  • Greg Reinacker: Atom feeds and well-formed XML: NewsGator 2.0, and all of the NewsGator editions being shipped as part of NewsGator Online Services on January 19, will parse Atom feeds using a very similar parser to that used for RSS; that means that most "questionable" feeds (of which there are a LOT) will parse ok. The vast majority of our customers don't care about well-formed XML - they care about getting information. Our tools are designed to make that happen.

comments: 0

9:36AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Mon 12 Jan 2004

Quick Links - 2004 01 12

Last update: 12/01/04; 09:24:04 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Harry Fuecks: The Command Pattern: The Command Pattern is about wrapping a request in an object. It turns up frequently in web application frameworks, e.g. form processing where the Command Pattern is used to handle user "actions".

comments: 0

9:25AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Sun 11 Jan 2004

Quick Links - 2004 01 11

Last update: 11/01/04; 16:19:52 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Joe Gregorio: There are no exceptions to Postel's Law: Let me put it this way, do you want your payroll deposit consumed by an ultra-liberal parser that 'fixes' errors in the XML as it consumes it? I didn't think so. But would you even care if a browser presented you a web page that was missing a closing tag on a div? Again, I didn't think so. Context is important and that's why blanket statements like "There are no exceptions to Postel's Law" are wrong, aside from the mis-representation of Postel's Law, and the ignoring the other half of the Law bit.

Culture

  • beatlebrunch.com: Before Shea Stadium, The Ed Sullivan Show, and the Cavern, Came the Casbah.: [Pete Best]: Well basically what we credited it as an untold story. It's a story which puts into perspective the role of the Casbah, the role of my mother Mona because she was very inspirational as regards to their success, a bit of an unsung hero in a way, in as much as she never took the acclaim, she never took the limelight for the help that she gave The Beatles, and she was always there to give them a lifeline. She was always there 100 percent. She was the first person who was inspirational in getting them a booking at the Cavern. It was Brian Epstein who came down and saw her to make sure she didn't want to manage the group. It was prior to him taking over as manager officially.

comments: 0

4:07PM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Fri 09 Jan 2004

Quick Links - 2004 01 09

Last update: 09/01/04; 11:11:06 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Marco Tabini: Why not leave MySQL alone?: What I really do not understand is why MySQL is burning itself so badly with the OSS people. In my opinion, they are doing a horrible job with their PR. I mean it. Horrible. Disgusting. Substandard. Simply put, they are throwing away money--small money when taken individually, to be sure, but substantial money nonetheless. Why? Complete, total lack of clarity. The licensing page on MySQL.com is about as clear as my heating bill--and I'm still trying to figure out why I pay 70% of my heating costs in taxes and levies. MySQL has been stumbling along promising a clear interpretation of their licensing policies for months. I have seen none. Let me explain what I mean by "clear interpretation" of their licensing terms. The average "small" developer--the one likely to be using PHP and MySQL, for example--does not have the means to afford a lawyer capable of explaining to him whether his particular case requires a commercial license. He needs examples. I built a PHP-based blogging tool (or, more generically, a commercial web tool) that supports MySQL (or that requires it). Do I need to pay a client license for the library? Does my client need a commercial license? Can I not distribute a free, but non GPL-ed, version of my software without paying a license?

comments: 0

10:55AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Thu 08 Jan 2004

Quick Links - 2004 01 08

Last update: 08/01/04; 09:26:28 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • kernelthread.com: What is Mac OS X? : This document does not aim to regurgitate Marketing KoolAid, "not that there's anything wrong with it[trademark]", but is intended primarily as an introduction to Mac OS X of those members of the technical community who are not familiar with it. You can think of it as a somewhat low-level taste of Apple's operating system. Consequently, some parts are fairly technical, and the implicit assumption is that you are familiar with fundamental concepts of one or more of BSD, Mach, UNIX, or operating systems in general. In many cases I have made no attempt to provide background details of the concepts referred to in the discussion. -> An incredible reference on the inwards of OS X. [via Simon Willison]

comments: 0

9:26AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Wed 07 Jan 2004

Quick Links - 2004 01 07

Last update: 07/01/04; 07:47:18 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Ron Hitchens: It Was Twenty Years Ago Today / Sgt Pepper Taught The Band To Play : My, how things have changed. A few months ago I bought a 15" Powerbook. Twenty years later I've returned to the Mac. I left the Mac behind many years ago because I didn't think it was a serious, professional grade system that I could use to earn my living. Today, I wouldn't want to use anything else. (O'Reilly Network)
  • Marco Tabini: Is my language really better than yours? : Languages must evolve and be efficient and reliable, of course. PHP5 is an important step towards a better language, which, in turn, translates into opportunities for a better platform. Ultimately, however, it's the platform itself that makes all the difference when it comes to bringing a product to market.

comments: 0

7:47AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Tue 06 Jan 2004

Quick Links - 2004 01 06

Last update: 06/01/04; 10:20:23 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Chris Shiflett: The Truth about Sessions - Session Management Exposed : Simple and effective methods to increase the security and reliability of your stateful PHP applications.(php magazine)
  • wordpress.org: WordPress : WordPress is a state-of-the-art semantic personal publishing platform with a focus on aesthetics, web standards, and usability. What a mouthful. More simply, Wordpress is what you use when you want to work with your software, not fight it. PHP/MySQL

comments: 0

10:18AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Mon 08 Dec 2003

Quick Links - 2003 12 08

Last update: 08/12/03; 11:01:10 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Ken MacLeod: The web is bigger than one application : The supposed benefit to "an RPC layer" is that it "marshals" your data for you (converting the web format in to and out of structures in your preferred language), thus making the application "simpler". The trade-off, then, is marshalling vs. all the possible tools and means and ways of interacting with web data that are out there. The error in this view is 1) it presumes marshalling can't be done with the web resource anyway, and 2) that everyone wants the same form of unmarshalled data. In other words, the trade-off is a short-term gain in one developer's toolkit vs. locking everyone else into similar toolkits. Specifically in the case of XML, "XML Object binding frameworks" are becoming quite common, and even built in to languages like MicroSoft's C# and ECMAScript (JavaScript's XScript); other XML tools, like XSLT, XPath, and CSS, are already "natively formatted".
  • Rich Bowen: A Day in the Life of #Apache : Today's piece jump-starts this new series, "A Day in the Life of #Apache", here on ONLamp. The goal of these articles will be to condense some of those frequent IRC conversations into a format that can be used to help folks with these commonly occurring problems, while, at the same time, reducing the burn-out rate of IRC tech support. And, of course, other folks can benefit from these articles without having to put up with the strange and surreal world that is IRC. (O'Reilly Network)
  • Sente SA: Concurrent Versions Librarian : CVL (Concurrent Versions Librarian) is a version and configuration management tool for MacOS X, Mac OS X Server (Rhapsody), Windows and OPENSTEP. It helps managing versions of various resources (source code, projects, documents). It allows parallel modifications as well as branches. CVL is useful for one and for many users. CVL is a graphical user interface to CVS (Concurrent Versioning System) most often used commands. Its work area viewer allows you to quickly check the status of your files and directories. -> This app works well with the integration of CVS in BBEdit.

comments: 0

11:19AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Wed 12 Nov 2003

Quick Links - 2003 11 12

Last update: 12/11/03; 10:20:53 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Joel Rennich: Bring on the Big Cat! : This one is a biggie. Apple thoroughly overhauled a large portion of its server operating system in this release. This is the most significant change to the Mac OS since Apple moved from Mac OS 9 to Mac OS X. This fact alone should be evidenced by the over 1,000 pages of documentation that Apple now ships with the system. All of these manuals are available online, so take a look in there for more information on any of things I cover here. Having said that, you'll be surprised at how much has stayed the same. The mail server, for example, was overhauled entirely; but yet the interface remains very similar to what it used to be. Also, as with other versions of Mac OS X it may be a few weeks, if not months, before you find all of the hidden gems that are contained in the operating system. So, without further ado, I'd like to walk through my initial impressions of having used both Mac OS X version 10.3 Server and client. [via MacSlash]
  • Panther Internet Sharing: Panther Internet Sharing : With the release of Panther, you can use your FireWire port for Internet sharing using a technology known as IP over FireWire (previously available for download as preview release). IP over FireWire essentially allows IP protocols-based services (such as HTTP, FTP, SSH, etc.) to be used over the FireWire connection. This means that you can use your FireWire port much like your Ethernet port. (O'Reilly Network)
  • Feyd: Comprehensive guide to.htaccess I am sure that most of you have heard of htaccess, if just vaguely, and that you may think you have a fair idea of what can be done with an htaccess file. You are more than likely mistaken about that, however. Regardless, even if you have never heard of htaccess and what it can do for you, the intention of this tutorial is to get you two moving along nicely together. If you have heard of htaccess, chances are that it has been in relation to implementing custom error pages or password protected directories. But there is much more available to you through the marvelously simple.htaccess file. (JavaScript Kit)

comments: 0

10:31AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Fri 07 Nov 2003

Quick Links - 2003 11 07

Last update: 07/11/03; 08:50:16 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • David Wilkinson: PHP Calendar : This is a PHP calendar class, suitable for use in both PHP 3 and PHP 4. It is very customisable and has the following features:
    • Month View
    • Year View
    • Specify start day of week
    • Specify start month of year for Year View
    • Highlight today's date
    • Forward and Backward navigation between months and years
    • Individual days within a month may be optionally linked to another page.
    • Appearance set by CSS style sheet.

comments: 0

9:03AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Thu 06 Nov 2003

Quick Links - 2003 11 06

Last update: 06/11/03; 09:03:11 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • David A. Wheeler: Best practices for accepting user data : In nearly all secure programs, your first line of defense is to check every piece of data you receive. If you can keep malicious data from entering your program, or at least keep it from being processed, your program becomes much harder to attack. This is very similar to how firewalls protect computer networks from attackers; it won't prevent all attacks, but it does make a program much more resistant. This process is called checking, validating, or filtering your data. One obvious question is, where should the checking be performed? When the data first enters the program, or later by a lower-level routine that actually uses the data? Often, it's best to check in both places; that way, if an attacker manages to slip around one defense, they'll still encounter the other. The most important rule is that all data must be checked before it's used. [via Linux Today]

comments: 0

9:16AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Tue 04 Nov 2003

Quick Links - 2003 11 04

Last update: 04/11/03; 08:45:40 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols: Outside Looking In: The BSD Operating Systems : A while back, someone asked me why the open-source BSD operating systems aren't as popular as Linux. It's a good question. Technically speaking, the BSDs are often every bit as good as Linux. Indeed, when it comes to security, OpenBSD is the best of breed. (eWeek)
  • Jake Savin: Work in progress: FTP for Manila : I've been working on releasing a new feature for Manila -- FTP-based static rendering. It's a cool feature, because you'll be able to host your Manila site wherever you want, as long as you have FTP access to the server -- a pretty standard feature for most hosting providers and many ISPs.

comments: 0

8:58AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Mon 03 Nov 2003

Quick Links - 2003 11 03

Last update: 03/11/03; 08:18:24 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Jan Libbenga: Why Spamcop got yanked :   Anyone who tried reporting spam to the popular Spamcop service this weekend got a nasty surprise. The site had bizarrely disappeared. And no, it wasn't a server outage. Joker.com, the German service that registered the Spamcop.net domain name, decided to yank the Spamcop.net domain name from its database, citing false Whois information. (The Register)

comments: 0

8:31AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Sun 02 Nov 2003

Quick Links - 2003 11 02

Last update: 02/11/03; 11:44:33 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • developer.apple.com: UNIX GUI Toolkits: The UNIX community has developed a wide range of GUI toolkits over the years, primarily built on top of the X11 Windowing system . Virtually all of these have been ported to Mac OS X, and many can even run directly on Quartz without the need for an X11 server. This page provides a link to the most popular toolkits.

comments: 0

11:57AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Fri 31 Oct 2003

Quick Links - 2003 10 31

Last update: 31/10/03; 09:06:03 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Adam Trachtenberg: PHP Web Services Without SOAP : REST, unlike SOAP, doesn't require you to install a separate tool kit to send and receive data. Instead, the idea is that everything you need to use Web services is already available if you know where to look. HTTP lets you communicate your intentions through GET, POST, PUT, and DELETE requests. To access resources, you request URIs from Web servers. [via PHPDeveloper.org]

comments: 0

9:18AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Wed 29 Oct 2003

Quick Links - 2003 10 29

Last update: 29/10/03; 11:31:06 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Carla Schroder: System recovery with Knoppix : This article shows how to access a non-booting Linux system with a Knoppix CD, get read-write permissions on configuration files, create and manage partitions and filesystems, and copy files to various storage media and over the network. You can use Knoppix for hardware and system configuration detection and for creating and managing partitions and filesystems. You can do it all from Knoppix's excellent graphical utilities, or from the command line. [via Linux Today]

comments: 0

11:42AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Tue 28 Oct 2003

Quick Links - 2003 10 28

Last update: 28/10/03; 09:50:22 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Late Night Software: Script Debugger 3.0.7 Update : Script Debugger 3.0.7 is a maintenance release that addresses a series of issues that came to light following the release of Script Debugger 3.0. If you are using Mac OS X 10.3 or later, you need Script Debugger 3.0.7.
  • John Lim: The Shape of Pharrots to Come : John Coggeshall mentions that the PHP on Parrot project has been named "Pharrot" by the php-con conference attendees. Here's my take on things. Now I don't have any inside info, so the following is entirely guesswork, and any resemblence to reality is entirely your imagination (...)
  • Harish Kamath: Doing More With phpMyAdmin (Part 1) : Over the course of this two-part article, I'm going to take you on a tour of one of the most popular Web-based tools for managing a MySQL database server. The first part of this article lays the foundation, explaining how to obtain the software, install and configure it for secure access, and use it for tasks such as managing multiple servers, manipulating user privileges, viewing reports on server activity, and exporting MySQL records into different formats. The second part explains the more advanced aspects of the application, including using it for transformations, maintaining a history of all the SQL queries executed in the phpMyAdmin session, defining relations between tables to create JOINs automatically, creating E-R diagrams in PDF format, and bookmarking important queries for future reference. (Developer Shed)
  • Fredrik Lundh: PythonDoc : The PythonDoc tool generates API documentation in HTML and other formats, based on descriptions in Python source files. PythonDoc is a Python implementation of the JavaDoc (tm) tool. PythonDoc 2.0 parses Python source code, looking for special documentation comments and the variables, functions, classes, and methods they're describing. By default, PythonDoc generates a set of HTML pages describing all documented components in the source files. PythonDoc can also generate XML files, which you can process in various ways using your favourite XML toolbox. [via Karl Dubost]

comments: 0

9:59AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Sun 26 Oct 2003

Quick Links - 2003 10 26

Last update: 26/10/03; 11:08:52 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • developer.apple.com: Networking : Mac OS X offers a rich set of programming interfaces for networking. These APIs provide advanced features as well as compatibility with existing software. This page highlights the programming interfaces that we recommend for new development on Mac OS X.
  • Dinu C. Gherman: RegexPlor : RegexPlor is a tool for interactively exploring regular expressions. It provides a graphic frontend for experimenting with such regular expressions in a intuitive way. You can edit an input text as well as a regular expression as well as colors for matched text, etc. and study various effects at every keystroke. This is a much more convenient way of hunting down the one expression you're after, without typing any code at all in the usual trial-and-error method.
  • PTH Consulting: PTHiTunesNotifier : PTHiTunesNotifier is an application that displays the currently playing iTunes track in an overlay window and allows you to control iTunes from the menu bar and via Hot Keys. The information is shown in an overlay window whenever the current track changes and disappears after a few seconds (think of the the text at the beginning of music videos).

comments: 0

11:20AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Thu 23 Oct 2003

Quick Links - 2003 10 23

Last update: 23/10/03; 09:52:28 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

comments: 0

10:00AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Wed 22 Oct 2003

Quick Links - 2003 10 22

Last update: 22/10/03; 14:32:13 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Georg Bauer: XML.com: The Atom API [Oct. 15, 2003] : Sorry, Mark, you won't gain good marks from me for this one. Drop out the XMLRPC bashing and the (historical wrong) hype, and the rest makes quite a good introduction into Atoms functionality and power. But with the first part attached, it makes bad feelings with people that like to follow different paths to implementations.
  • Andrew Anderson: Start Me Up: Writing and Understanding OS X StartupItems : In this article I will give an overview of how StartupItems fit into the OS X startup process, what you need to do to create a Startup Item, and provide an example of a StartupItem that will run the Apache project's Tomcat Java servlet engine. (O'Reilly Mac DevCenter)
  • Harry Fuecks: User Mode Linux - the third way for hosting? : But how about this as a price - 32Mb Ram, 750Mb HD Space, 5Gb transfer/month and root access for 10 Euro / month? This is what VD Server, a German hosting company, are offering for entry level accounts. What makes this possible is User Mode Linux, a version of Linux which other instances of the Linux operating system to be run in a completely isolated (including IP stack) virtual machine. That means a hosting provider can safely give you root access to a virtual server without having to worry about what you do with it. VD Server, for example, provide you with a Debian installation over which you have comlpete control.
  • inknoise.com: Layout-o-matic : Select a layout type, width, and other options to the left, and then click Download or View and pick up your multi-column CSS layout starter kit (turning it into something unique and beautiful not included). You're welcome to use the resulting generated layouts for any purpose, personal or commercial. [via Karl Dubost]

comments: 0

11:15AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Fri 03 Oct 2003

Quick Links - 2003 10 03

Last update: 03/10/03; 09:14:10 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Cameron Barret: On the Campaign Trail : Today, I was offered a formal position as the "blog strategy guy" (official title pending) for the Clark campaign. I haven't accepted it yet but I'm pretty sure that I will. Working on the Clark campaign is a chance of a lifetime and I'd be pretty crazy to turn the offer down. How many times in your life to have a chance to change the way political campaigns work? How often do you have a chance to change the world?
  • Gregory Trubetskoy: Introducing mod_python: This release [version 3.1] introduces native handling of cookies, including support for cryptographic signing of cookie data (using HMAC), as well as the ability to marshal (serialize) simple objects into cookie values. There is support for session management with fairly thorough random session id generation logic and the ability to take advantage of signed cookies. Sessions can be stored in either a dbm file or directly in memory depending on whether Apache runs in multi-process or threaded mode. Sessions support session locks using Apache's internal global mutex interface to provide mutual exclusion across all processes and threads. The Session class is extensible, so that it is easy to implement custom session objects which use alternative persistent storage, such as a relational database. Last, but not the least, version 3.1 introduces mod_python's own implementation of PSP (Python Server Pages). This is a framework that allows embedding Python code within HTML similar to the way it is done in PHP, JSP, or ASP. The core parser implementation for mod_python PSP was initially written and graciously contributed to mod_python by Sterling Hughes, a core PHP developer. The PSP parser is generated using flex, one of the fastest scanning and parsing tools in existence. It also integrates nicely with other tools provided by mod_python such as session handling, altogether resulting in one of the fastest Server Page implementations available.[via Simon Willison]
  • Alex Harper: MenuMeters : MenuMeters is a set of CPU, memory, disk, and network monitoring tools for MacOS X. Although there are numerous other programs which do the same thing, none had quite the feature set I was looking for. Most were windows that sat in a corner or on the desktop, which are inevitably obscured by document windows on a PowerBook's small screen. Those monitors which used the menubar mostly used the NSStatusItem API, which has the annoying tendency to totally reorder my menubar on every login. The MenuMeters monitors are true SystemUIServer plugins (also known as Menu Extras). This means they can be reordered using command-drag and remember their positions in the menubar across logins and restarts.
  • ranchero.com: How NetNewsWire Identifies Itself to Servers : NetNewsWire and NetNewsWire Lite identify themselves to servers via the User-Agent header.

comments: 0

9:15AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Thu 02 Oct 2003

Quick Links - 2003 10 02

Last update: 02/10/03; 10:27:29 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • nyphp.org: PHundamentals : As an active and diverse user community, the members of New York PHP possess unique insights into common questions and concerns for developing AMP Technology solutions. So, we thought it'd be valuable to the community if these best practices were compiled and put online. On a regular basis, specific topics are posted to NYPHP-Talk for discussion. After list gurus and new users alike share their techniques and practices, this valuable knowledge is captured as an informative online article for all to use. -> See Virtual Hosting Setup - Windows 98/XP & Linux with Apache and Various ways of evaluating a variable.
  • developer.apple.com: Customization Techniques: The Mac OS X boot process includes several entry points that developers can use to customize the process. Developers can create new system daemons and services to be launched at boot time. Developers and system administrators can also create initialization scripts to be run when a user logs in to the system. This section covers:
    • Creating Custom Startup Items
    • Starting and Stopping Startup Items
    • Customizing Login and Logout Procedures
    • Using Environment Variables
    • Replacing the Finder
    [via chaotic intransient prose bursts]

comments: 0

10:32AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Tue 30 Sep 2003

Quick Links - 2003 09 30

Last update: 30/09/03; 08:58:51 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • activestate.com: Sophos Acquires Anti-Spam Specialist ActiveState: Sophos, a world leader in anti-virus protection for businesses, today announced that it has acquired ActiveState, a North American software company that develops anti-spam software for enterprises and professional tools for open source language programmers. -> More information on the deal from ActiveState here.
  • kses - PHP HTML/XHTML filter: kses 0.2.1 README [kses strips evil scripts!]: Welcome to kses - an HTML/XHTML filter written in PHP. It removes all unwanted HTML elements and attributes, no matter how malformed HTML input you give it. It also does several checks on attribute values. kses can be used to avoid Cross-Site Scripting (XSS), Buffer Overflows and Denial of Service attacks, among other things.

comments: 0

9:05AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Sat 30 Aug 2003

Quick Links - 2003 08 30

Last update: 30/08/03; 11:05:18 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Mark Paschal: rsswriter Roundup detector : rsswriter is a Roundup reactor for producing RSS 2.0 feed versions of your Roundup issue trackers.
  • dreamflow.nl: About SSHKeychain : SSHKeychain is a graphical front-end for ssh-agent and ssh-add on Mac OS X.
  • isolani: Desparate spammers resort to viruses : So what has this to do with spammers? Well, interestingly enough one of the features of SoBig.F is to set itself as an open mail relay. With millions of open relays open on millions of broadband connections, spammers now have more open relays than they know what to do with. This action of creating open relay on user's computers is certainly a desperate measure for spammers. That can be taken as a sign that open-relay blocking is actually working and causing serious problems for spammers. Serious problems enough for them to break the law by breaking into users computers.
  • Simon Willison: Learning mod_rewrite : I think I've finally cracked mod_rewrite, thanks mainly to SitePoint.
  • O'Reilly: Book Review Guidelines: O'Reilly provides copies of our books for your members to review in your newsletter, website, and other book review sites
  • Kevin O'Malley: Version Control on Mac OS X, Part 3 : Welcome back. In the first article of this series, you were introduced to version control and learned some of its concepts. The second article gave you a chance to apply this knowledge by using CVS from the command line, as well as under Project Builder, on a simple Cocoa program -- MyPing. In this final article of this series, we will look at creating software releases using the CVS tag and branch commands, as well as some Mac OS X GUIs for interacting with a CVS repository. (O'Reilly Network)
  • Matt Neuburg: AppleScript: The Definitive Guide : AppleScript: The Definitive Guide explores and teaches the language from the ground up. If you're a beginner and want to learn how to write your first script or just understand what the excitement is all about, you'll be able to do so after reading this book. You'll also learn how to interpret dictionary files, use coercions to streamline scripts, debug and troubleshoot scripts, and more. Experienced AppleScripters will love having the most definitive, up-to-date AppleScript language reference available. -> November 2003 (est.) (O'Reilly)

comments: 0

10:54AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Fri 29 Aug 2003

Quick Links - 2003 08 29

Last update: 29/08/03; 20:38:21 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • news.oreillynet.com: Welcome to O'Reilly's Developer News site, where we will be featuring what we feel are the most interesting and important news stories of the day. Feel free to submit stories for consideration. We want your feedback, so please let us know if you find this site helpful, or what else you'd like to see here.
  • regular-expressions.info: Welcome to Regular-Expressions.info The Premier Web Site about Regular Expressions
  • pudge: "Perl" Added to Oxford English Dictionary (use Perl)
  • phpxmlclasses.sourceforge.net: PHP XML Classes : A collection of classes and resources to process XML using PHP [via PHP Everywhere]
  • BlueShoes.org: PHP Cheat Sheet -> Trueness of falseness with empty () and comparison operators ('==' and '===')
  • php.net: PHP type comparison tables : The following tables demonstrate behaviors for PHP types and comparison operators, for both loose and strict comparisons. This supplemental is also related to the manual section on type juggling. Inspiration was provided by various user comments and by the work over at BlueShoes.
  • LittleThinkTank: RSS Lurking : Since installing the new version 1.0.4 of Ranchero's excellent RSS aggregator, NetNewsWire , I've gotten myself a new hobby. For lack of a more appropriate descriptive, I've decided to call it RSS Lurking - spying on weblog writers as they edit their work. One of the new features (read, ways of losing more of your valuable time to your information fetish ) incorporated into this version is the ability to see changes to an RSS post. Switch it on (you have to tick "Highlight changes" in Preferences), and refresh your newsfeeds.
  • Werner Vogels: Web Services are not Distributed Objects: Common Misconceptions about Service Oriented Architectures: Web services are frequently described as the new incarnation of distributed object technology. This is a serious misconception, made by people from industry and academia alike, and this misconception seriously limits a broader acceptance of the true web services architecture. Even though the architects of distributed systems and internet systems alike have been vocal about the fact that these technologies hardly have any relationship, it appears to be difficult to dispel the myth that they are tied together. In this article I revisit the differences between web services and distributed objects in an attempt to make it clear that web services are an internet-style distributed systems technology that does not rely on, or require, any form of distributed object technology. Unfortunately, the mix-up about web services and distributed object systems is not the only misconception that is commonly heard. There are at least a dozen other popular statements about web services that are partially incorrect or just plain wrong. This article also contains clarifications of a number of these common misconceptions about web services.
  • Sean B. Palmer: Python RDF Parser (& Improvemen : rdfxml.py is an RDF/XML parser written mostly in one night and in under 10KB of code. It's been released under GPL 2 and the W3C's software license. [via Karl Dubost]
  • Sean B. Palmer: WyPy: A Minimal Python Wiki : WyPy is a wiki implemented in just 23 lines of Python code, including shebang. It was written as a contender for the ShortestWikiContest , and implements all of the basic Wiki principles. It is released under GPL 2. [via Karl Dubost]
  • RubLog: RubLog - flexible blogging in Ruby: RubLog is a simple weblog server with a couple of interesting features: 1. It supports multiple, pluggable input formats. Currently supported are Ruby's RDoc, HTML, and plain text. 2. It can operate from either standard hierarchies of flatfiles...

comments: 0

8:53AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Wed 27 Aug 2003

Quick Links - 2003 08 27

Last update: 27/08/03; 08:27:43 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

comments: 0

8:26AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Tue 26 Aug 2003

Quick Links - 2003 08 26

Last update: 26/08/03; 10:53:19 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Eric Raymond: An Open Letter to Darl McBride: Linus Torvalds is backing me on this, and our other chieftains and philosopher-princes will as well. Show us the overlaps. If your code has been inserted in our work, we'll remove it -- not because you've threatened us but because that's the right thing to do, whether the patches came from IBM or anywhere else. Then you can call off your lawyers and everyone will get to go home happy. Take that offer while you still can, Mr. McBride. So far your so-called 'evidence' is crap ; you'd better climb down off your high horse before we shoot that sucker entirely out from under you. How you finish the contract fight you picked with IBM is your problem. As the president of OSI, defending the community of open-source hackers against predators and carpetbaggers is mine -- and if you don't stop trying to destroy Linux and everything else we've worked for I guarantee you won't like what our alliance is cooking up next. [via Slashdot]
  • Conversation: IRC for the rest of us : Conversation allows you to chat in channels and with your friends, in a simple elegant, and mac like interface without the use of any text command. Yet, it has a comprehensive set of features, some unique to Conversation. -> Freeware
  • Jon Udell: Dynamic languages and virtual machines: What about robustness? In a world where computation lived within a single VM, strong type-checking and bytecode verification may have been reasons to prefer languages such as C# and Java. But we don't live in that world any more. Computation is distributed; interfaces are language neutral and document oriented; cross-domain trust is a work in progress. In these circumstances, dynamic languages -- which neither the Java nor .Net VMs yet fully embrace -- may be the best way to tame the services network we are now constructing. (infoWorld)
  • Dave Winer: MetaWeblog API : It is now safe to deploy applications based on this spec.
  • Glenn Graham: Postfix: A Secure and Easy-to-Use MTA : Postfix attempts to be fast, easy to administer, and secure, while at the same time being compatible enough with Sendmail so as not to upset existing users. Thus, the outside has a Sendmailish flavor, but the inside is completely different. (O'Reilly Network)
  • Ranchero Software: What's New in NetNewsWire 1.0.4: NetNewsWire now uses Web Kit, Safari's HTML renderer--so descriptions render much better than in earlier versions of NetNewsWire. There are a number of new HTML preferences: you can set the standard and fixed-width fonts. You can enable and disable plug-ins, Java, and JavaScript. You can even specify a custom style sheet if you want to customize how NetNewsWire displays HTML.

Politics

  • Brian Whitaker: Get real : There is another danger to stability in Iraq that is less often mentioned. It is Bremer's Coalition Provisional Authority. The CPA is the temporary civilian power, but it is not just paving the way for a new Iraqi government. It is trying to reshape the country by implementing the neo-conservatives' "clean break" philosophy. "Clean break" is a truly revolutionary approach. There are no quick fixes. If something doesn't work, you knock it down and start again. One example of this is the extreme lengths that de-Baathification has gone to. Ghassan Salamé, a UN political advisor in Iraq reported that 1,832 university professors and 14,000 secondary school heads had been sacked, even though most of them had only joined the Baath party in order to get a job. According to the French magazine, Le Nouvel Observateur, it's much the same with dentists. But if you've got toothache, you don't really care whether the man with the drill is a Baathist or not. Politics apart, there is certainly a lot that ought to change in Iraq: rooting out corruption, making government accountable and transparent, etc, etc, etc. But as a maximalist approach, "clean break" also maximises the risk of failure. The neo-conservatives are wedded to it because of their wider agenda - to create a western-orientated democracy in Iraq that can be exported to Iran, Syria and other "problem" countries in the region. But turning Iraq into a neo-conservative paradise - a process euphemistically and patronisingly described as "nation-building" - cannot be done in a hurry, and that is the heart of the CPA's problem. Bremer keeps urging patience, but time is not on his side. (Guardian Unlimited)
  • comments: 0

    8:47AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Mon 25 Aug 2003

Quick Links - 2003 08 25

Last update: 25/08/03; 08:03:46 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Mark Nottingham: Atomic Draft : Somehow, I've been drafted into editing the Atom syntax specification, and have just thrown up a first draft .
  • Mark Pilgrim: Atom API revised : Joe Gregorio :New Atom API Implementation Release. Thanks to all the people who gave feedback on the first release, especially Ken Coar and Simon Willison. In response to their feedback, Joe and I have revised our prototype of the Atom API to more gracefully integrate with existing HTTP authentication infrastructure. Only the authentication scheme has changed; the rest of the Atom API remains the same for now. See Joe's post for the (small) list of changes to the authentication scheme, and the rationale behind them.
  • Joe Gregorio: New AtomAPI Implementation Release : We came, we saw, we did, we got spanked, we did it right. Last week Mark Pilgrim and I released an implementation of the AtomAPI, both a client and a server. That implementation included a new authorization scheme that we came up with. Now we would have liked to used HTTP Digest authentication, and the AtomAPI should support Digest authentication, but for many users setting up Digest just isn't possible. Many users, like myself, are using a server that does not have Digest authentication turned on. Similarly not everyone has the ability to use .htaccess files, which you need to be able to modify to setup Digest autentication, that or modify your servers httpd.conf which is even rarer still. However we heard from CMS vendors that they want at least the level of password security that HTTP Digest offers. So we needed to come up with a scheme that:
    1. Is a challenge-response Digest authentication scheme.
    2. Is able to be handled by a CGI program with no .htaccess ,httpd.conf tricks or requirements to be running as an Apache module, ala mod_perl or mod_python.
    3. Gracefully extends current authentication schemes.
    4. Is the simplest thing that could possibly work.
    So what we did was a simple transposition of Digest authentication into custom HTTP headers (...)
  • The Well-Formed Web: The HTTP verb PUT under Apache: Safe or Dangerous? : "Is the HTTP verb PUT under Apache safe or dangerous?" This is a question I come across often, and have now run into it twice in the work on Atom. So is it safe? The answer is maybe.
  • Russell E Owen: Install MySQLdb module on mac os x : Here's how I installed mySQL running with Python
  • Brent Simmons: New NetNewsWire feature: Keyboard Shortcuts page : Then I thought of Web Kit, and I had an a-ha moment: I could use a very basic window that just displays an HTML page. All it took then was to create the window and write the HTML page itself. Piece of cake.
  • Tony Stubblebine: Regular Expression Pocket Reference: Ideal as an introduction for beginners and a quick reference for advanced programmers, Regular Expression Pocket Reference is a comprehensive guide to regular expression APIs for C, Perl, PHP, Java, .NET, Python, vi, and the POSIX regular expression libraries. -> Sample Excerpt: Introduction to Regexes and Pattern Matching (PDF) | Sample Excerpt: PHP (PDF)
  • XMLNUKE.COM: XMLNUKE : XMLNuke is a site content management. No database is needed and it has a minimum setup. Only just uses XML and XSLT files. The main engine is working and supports internationalization, multiple sites, page caching for improve performance, classes for custom modules, and much more. [via More Like This WebLog]
  • php|architect weblog: Using the filesystem as a simple database: My take on a quick solution was the use of the filesystem to actually do the indexing. With a bit of ingenuity, it's easy enough to work with a structure that causes no more than ten files and ten subdirectories to be stored in any given directory, thus making for extremely fast retrieval.
  • another useless website.co.uk: This site is basically about nothing. You can't buy anything or play games or look at dirty pictures or read a dull blog. There is no interactive element or fancy animation or 'community' element to keep you coming back to see if someone has responded to your controversial statement about Britney. However, there is a plan. That plan is to generate 1 million hits in just one year. For a site with no content that might seem a mean feat but then looking around the web these days, popularity is pretty unpredictable.

Politics

  • Nicholas Blanford and Dan Murphy: For Al Qaeda, Iraq may be the next battlefield: "Iraq is developing as Al Qaeda's new battlefield," says Rohan Gunaratna, an author and terrorism expert. "Without a theater of jihad, they cannot produce terrorists for operations anywhere else. They lost Afghanistan, so they needed a new combat theater in which to train and inspire. And the US invasion gave it to them." Thousands of Muslim volunteers flocked to Afghanistan in the 1980s to fight Soviet occupation forces which had invaded the country in 1979. The cumbersome Soviet military was unable to subdue the lightly armed, resourceful Afghan and Arab mujahideen (holy fighters) and withdrew from the country in 1988. Now analysts say that calls for young men to fight in Iraq are popping up on jihad websites across the world. If Gunaratna is right, the US is in for a long and bloody occupation. In the thinking of Al Qaeda, the mere sustaining of a presence, and the ability to carry out intermittent attacks, is a form of victory, a sign that the world's great superpower is incapable of stamping them out. (csmonitor.com)
  • Howard LaFranchi: World balks at growing Iraq perils : Although before the war countries balked at what they believed would be opening the door to a muscle-flexing America, now concerns are growing that the postwar stage is turning into the beginning of a guerrilla war with global terrorists. Signs are multiplying that anyone associated with the occupation will be targeted, as last week's bombing of the UN building in Baghdad and Saturday's deadly attack on British forces in Basra suggest. With this in mind, countries are reluctant to sign on to something that is still seen too much as America's war and not enough of a campaign to help Iraqis. (csmonitor.com)

comments: 0

8:00AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Fri 22 Aug 2003

Quick Links - 2003 08 22

Last update: 22/08/03; 09:14:38 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Seth Dillingham: Email Virus: Why Don't People Switch Clients? : This afternoon I was sitting in a waiting room while the dealer changed my truck's oil. CNN was on the television. They reported on the virus... but they referred to it only as an "email virus." They didn't mention that this is "email virus" is really an "Outlook virus," because it only affects Outlook users. They didn't mention that it only infects Outlook on Windows. They didn't mention that there are alternatives to Outlook.
  • Brent Simmons: NetNewsWire 1.0.4b3 : Some highlights: it uses Web Kit now to display HTML, it's faster, you can highlight differences in updated items, gzip compression is supported, and there's a new Delete Read Items command. -> More details on these features: Gzip compression and RSS and HTML differences
  • Keith Devens: RSS auto-discovery with PHP : I'm in the process of writing my own RSS aggregator. Naturally, I wanted to be able to use the new RSS auto-discovery method which has evolved over the past few days . Mark Pilgrim made some Javascript bookmarklets and a Python implementation to do this, but I needed a PHP implementation, so I wrote one. [via Roland Tanglao]
  • Mark Pilgrim: Should Atom Use RDF? : The problem with discussing RDF (where that means, "I think this data format should be RDF") is that you can support any four of these RDF issues (model, syntax, tools, vision), in any combination, while vigorously arguing against the others. People who believe that the RDF conceptual model is a good thing may think that the RDF/XML serialization is wretched, or that there are no good RDF tools for their favorite language, or that the Semantic Web is an unattainable pipe dream, or any combination of these things. People who are familiar with robust RDF tools (such as RDFLib for Python) -- and, thus, never have to look at the RDF/XML serialization because their tools hide it from them completely -- may nonetheless think that RDF/XML is wretched. People who defend the RDF/XML syntax may have nothing polite to say about the vision of the Semantic Web. And around and around it goes... (XML.com)

comments: 0

9:13AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Thu 21 Aug 2003

Quick Links - 2003 08 21

Last update: 21/08/03; 07:48:18 EDT

Politics

  • Howard LaFranchi: US options: more troops or more help: Coupled with that sentiment is growing bewilderment among Iraqis about why the US is not more quickly returning the country to normal life. "They remember that as terrible as Saddam was, he got the country back on track with amazing speed after [the first Gulf War in] '91," says Murphy. That experience tells Iraqis that rebuilding their country is possible. But putting them more in charge of their future - getting the police and elements of a new military up and running, for example - has to move faster, experts say. "We don't have enough people in there, and we're finding that other countries have more of the kind of people we need," says Mr. Gvosdev. Indeed, for some analysts, it is not more soldiers that are needed, no matter where they are from, but experts in a variety of fields who can help give the country a sense of order and progress, and prepare Iraqis to take over for themselves. "A hundred more trainers for all the services the Iraqis need to take on themselves are much more important at this stage than 1,000 more young men to guard locations," says Patrick Clawson, deputy director of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. "We've been slow at that, but sending in any more combat troops is not going to address that central issue." (csmonitor.com)

comments: 0

7:47AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Wed 20 Aug 2003

Quick Links - 2003 08 20

Last update: 20/08/03; 08:07:42 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Robert Daely: PHPosxom's New Home : Hello, gang! PHPosxom's new home on SourceForge is getting fleshed out nicely.
  • Brent Simmon: How to deal with broken feeds : Tim Bray writes about how to deal with broken PEAW feeds : "I would absolutely require basic XML well-formedness." Me, I would absolutely love it if I, as an aggregator developer, could require well-formedness. In other words, if a feed isn't well-formed, then NetNewsWire would not parse it and display it. The thing is, that doesn't work now for RSS--but not because of anything special to RSS, it's because feed generators don't always produce well-formed XML. There's no reason to expect PEAW feed generators would be any different. (Both RSS and PEAW require well-formedness. No difference there.) ("Inessential")
  • Russell Owen: How to define environment variables so that MacOS X applications can see them. : MacOS X native applications do not see unix environment variables defined in ~/.cshrc or any other of the standard unix configuration files. Normally this doesn't matter, but certain MacOS X applications can make good use of environment variables. These include the framework build of Python (which is used to write wxPython or aqua Tk appliations) and BBEdit (which can directly run unix scripts, but without your environment variables unless you define them in this fashion). The trick is to define your environment variables in the file ~/.MacOSX/environment.plist . You will almost certainly have to create the directory and the file yourself.
  • John Gruber: On Newsstands Now : For your paper-and-ink enjoyment, the September 2003 issue of Macworld contains an article by yours truly, pp 74-76, entitled "BBEdit Version Control". It's about using BBEdit 7.0's new built-in CVS integration on Mac OS X (Daring Fireball)
  • More Like This WebLog: Postel's Law doesn't mean you're entitled to be messy : Aaron Swartz observes that enforcing well-formed and valid RSS won't work . It's a prisoners' dilemma . Anyone making tools which consume RSS have an incentive to defect, and write something forgiving . Of course, you know where that leads: an aggregator war.

comments: 0

8:12AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Tue 19 Aug 2003

Looking for a Newbie Python Mailing List

I decided after all these years to learn Python. I'm mostly interested in Zope, Plone and the CMF framework.

Since I want to learn Python, I'm looking for a low volume friendly Python newbie list. I know my fair share of scripting languages (UserTalk, Perl, PHP, Javascript, AppleScript), and I work as a programmer (mostly developing specialized frameworks in PHP).

If you have any recommendations for such a beast, please comment here. Thanks.

comments: 0

6:00PM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Quick Links - 2003 08 19

Last update: 19/08/03; 05:47:42 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Brent Simmons: Dave Winer writes today about how there are mail-reader-type aggregators and weblog-type aggregators, and that weblog-type aggregators are better. It's a false dichotomy. Dave writes: "Imho we already have enough mail readers, wire up RSS to email and you're done." The thing is, the mail reader aggregators are not very much like mail readers. They are smart about what they're displaying. On the surface they look like email apps, but it's not a simple substitution, news items for email. I'll use NetNewsWire as an example, not because it's unique in this regard but because I know it well. (...) Dave writes: "People who are just using mail-reader style aggregators are really missing something." Actually, no, they're not. -> At last some corrections to misinformation. As Dave says in the referred post: "get the real story, not the easy one".
  • Simon Willison: Atom API : The authentication mechanism is particularly interesting: since Apache's support for digest authentication requires an additional module that many hosts may not provide, the Atom guys have created their own based around new Atom-Authenticate HTTP headers. This is the only part of the current specification that I, as a PHP developer, have a problem with. To my knowledge, there is no way of directly accessing non-standard HTTP headers from within a PHP script. As such, it would be impossible for a PHP Atom API application to support Atom authentication. This is a serious barrier to adoption of the standard, especially as PHP is by far the most popular open source web scripting technology. -> Check the comments for this post for a possible solution, and see this post on the Atom-Syntax list. The whole thread is quite interesting too.
  • Daniel Berlinger: Atom API implementation: This line was particularly fascinating: "Vendors may add their own custom fields, in a namespace, that do not duplicate the functionality of core Atom elements." I guess funkified Atom feeds are not recommended by Mark... somewhat ironic, Neh? -> At least, Mark Pilgrim is quite clear about it.
  • Aaron Swartz: Postel's Law Has No Exceptions : As Mark Pilgrim is fond of saying, "There are no exceptions to Postel's Law." (Postel's Law is generally quoted as "be liberal in what you accept and conservative in what you put out" or something to that effect.) The message of the law is that interoperability is the primary concern, and that programs should accept things, even things that are against the spec, if necessary to achieve interoperability.
  • Kirk McElhearn: A Mac User's Guide to the Unix Command Line, Part 3: Lesson 3: Moving, Copying, and Deleting Files and Directories (TidBITS)
  • Knoppix.net: This website is about Knoppix, a Free and Open Source Live Linux CD. Knoppix is a GNU/Linux distribution that boots runs completely from cd. It includes recent linux software and desktop environments, with programs such as OpenOffice.org, Abiword, The Gimp, Konqueror, Mozilla, and hundreds more quality open source programs. [via More Like This WebLog]

comments: 0

5:22AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Mon 18 Aug 2003

Quick Links - 2003 08 18

Last update: 18/08/03; 13:28:01 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Mark Pilgrim: Atom API implementation: Here is a working implementation of the Atom API. Well, part of it anyway. It supports introspection (to discover what functions are supported), creating new entries, editing existing entries, deleting entries, retrieving entries, and searching for entries. It does not support editing user preferences, getting or setting categories, or adding comments. This implementation is entirely self-contained within a single CGI script and runs on a default Apache install with no .htaccess tricks. Hopefully this will clear up a number of misconceptions about REST APIs in general and the Atom API in particular, especially the one about it being impossible to implement as a single CGI script on a default Apache install with no .htaccess tricks. It is possible; I'm doing it.
  • snellspace: RDF, XML and Interoperability : What the model-driven crowd needs to understand is that the syntax-driven folks will be swayed by their arguments only when they are presented with a serialization syntax that is simple and accessible to them. What the syntax-driven crowd needs to understand is that the model-driven folks will only be happy with a syntax that is compatible and generic enough to work their model framework. [via Formely Echo]
  • Network Abuse Clearinghouse: Mail relay testing: We offer an experimental mail relay testing service.

Politics

  • Faleh A Jabar: Who is behind the violence in Iraq? : The violence appears to stem from a multitude of sources and causes in which politics, ideology, culture, poverty and blunders by the Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA) are to blame. While most Iraqis do not support the politics of violence, they do not effectively oppose it either - one of the many paradoxes in the Iraqi puzzle. (BBC News)

comments: 0

7:47AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Thu 14 Aug 2003

Quick Links - 2003 08 14

Last update: 14/08/03; 09:05:01 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Michael Tsai : Review: CVSTrac 1.1.2 : CVSTrac is a Web-based issue tracking tool that integrates with the CVS version control system, popular among Mac OS X and Unix users. An "issue" can be anything you want: a bug report, a feature request, a technical support incident, a to-do item, or simply a chunk of text that means something to you. CVSTrac is designed for software developers, but it's also useful for tracking information in other domains. Developers can think of it as a lightweight product that combines the basic features of Bugzilla and CVSweb . Non-developers can think of it as a Web-based information management and collaboration tool along the lines of Inspiration ,Slacker ToDo Lists , and ToDo X . (...) CVSTrac, in contrast, is a single file that includes a built-in Web server and database engine. Although you can build your own copy of CVSTrac from its source code, it's much easier to download a pre-built version for Linux or Mac OS X , the latter hosted by yours truly. (ATPM: About This Particular Mactintosh) [via Ranchero Software]
  • cpanratings.perl.org: CPAN Ratings (BETA): Ratings and Reviews for CPAN [via use Perl]
  • Rogers Cadenhead : Radio UserLand Kick Start: Backing Up Data : The next three chapters explore Radio.root and the other object databases. Because these files can be an extremely perilous place for a new learner to putter around, the first topic covered is how to back up and restore the software and all of Radio's databases and files.
  • Micah Dubinko: XForms Essentials: The book in your hands introduces you to XForms, a combination of two of the most successful experiments ever performed on the Web: XML and forms. -> See also the companion weblog to the book which is going to be published by O'Reilly..
  • Michael Wechner : OSCOM Hackathon/Sprint at Seybold : OSCOM ( http://www.oscom.org ) is organizing a Hackathon/Sprint during Seybold conference - http://www.seybold365.com/sf2003/event/index.php?s=special_events - We will focus on WebDAV and the weblog specification "Atom".
  • padawan.info: Francosphere : Dear non-francophone readers, I will not bother you anymore with my French posts on this weblog. The French side of the Force now has its own separate weblog at padawan.info/fr . Of course, francophones who can read English can enjoy both (amazingly, it works also for anglophones who can read French). Actually I lied, I will continue to annoy all of you with the French side of the Force, only I will do it in English.

comments: 0

9:04AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Wed 13 Aug 2003

Quick Links - 2003 08 13

Last update: 13/08/03; 09:08:36 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Maureen Dowd: Blah Blah Blog: The most telling sign that the Internet is no longer the cool American frontier? Blogs, which sprang up to sass the establishment, have been overrun by the establishment. In a lame attempt to be hip, pols are posting soggy, foggy, bloggy musings on the Internet. Inspired by Howard Dean's success in fund-raising and mobilizing on the Web, candidates are crowding into the blogosphere -- spewing out canned meanderings in a genre invented by unstructured exhibitionists. (New-York Times)

comments: 0

9:10AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Tue 12 Aug 2003

Quick Links - 2003 08 12

Last update: 12/08/03; 09:59:23 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Atom Wiki: WikiGardening chat, Tuesday, August 12, 2003 15:30 GMT ( local timezones ) on #echo at irc.freenode.net for 90 minutes, then as participation permits.
  • php|architect: Welcome to php|cruise , the most exciting PHP event under the sun! : php|cruise is a five-day cruise (March 1st through March 5th, 2004) packed with over 50 hours of PHP training for beginners and professionals alike--all in the luxurious and fun atmosphere of a Caribbean cruise aboard one of the best ships of the Royal Caribbean Cruise Line.
  • Daniel Berlinger: here: A copy of the RSD spec can be found here. While this is an improvement since a single point of failure has been removed, both servers are on the same net, and connected via the same ISP. Dave was kind enough to volunteer to upload it here to the Harvard servers. Thanks Dave! Pointers to the copies will be added to the original spec. Others are welcome to post this version in its entirety, to ensure that it is always available.
  • mondotimes.com: Welcome to Mondo Times - Now covering 13,350 media outlets in 211 countries : Access newspapers, magazines, radio and TV stations around the world. Find local media by country and major media by topic .

comments: 0

7:45AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Mon 11 Aug 2003

Quick Links - 2003 08 11

Last update: 11/08/03; 10:53:38 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Maricopa Center for Learning and Instruction: Syndicating Learning Objects with RSS and Trackback : Customized collections of learning objects from multiple repositories are achieved with simple, existing RSS protocols, creating access to a wider range of objects than a single source. This provides discipline-specific windows into collections, contextual wrappers via blogging tools, and a system for connecting objects and implementations via TrackBack. (More)The explosion of web-based commentary via weblogs is being fueled by the addition of RSS publishing features in blogging applications such as Radio Userland and MovableType . RSS allows blog sites to be constantly updated with "feeds" from related blog sites, building a vast interconnected network, a social construct of connected commentary. This same approach can be easily applied to collections of learning objects as a vehicle for expanding the practice of discovery beyond the blast of a web search. RSS provides a dynamic publishing of say the newest 10 objects added to Repostory X. Any repository that houses its content or meta-data in a database can, in a matter of hours, generate properly formed RSS feeds for describing every object in that collection. In addition, our repositories have enabled a customized feed that provides an RSS route to the results of any search on that site. For example, a feed of all objects from Repository X in the subject area of "Psychology" may contain objects with reference to "reinforcement" in the description field. This presentation will demonstrate how to create RSS views into the collections from different organizations. These views may be aggregated into user defined collections via desktop applications such as Amphetadesk and NetNewsWire, and even allow collections defined by academic subject.
  • www.elearnspace.org: Explaining RSS is like explaining sex. You just don't get it until you do it.
  • Atom Wiki: OffWikiPages : External web pages specifically about Echo
  • Bill Kearney: Spheres of interest : Consider that you can use your Foaf file to make statements about what things are of interest to you. That way anyone pivoting through Foafspace would, in theory, be able to traverse along common lines of interest. So someone that might otherwise never appear on your Radar screen suddenly appears because of unexpected discoveries of like interests.
  • Formerly Echo: Service description formats: Atom Autodiscovery/Introspection in AtomAPI, RSD, WSDL, OWL-S, RDDL
  • Sifry's Alerts: Technorati Tutorial, Part 1: Some basics about Technorati

comments: 0

10:55AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Fri 08 Aug 2003

Quick Links - 2003 08 08

Last update: 08/08/03; 16:23:57 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Don Park: BloggerCon 2003 : Although I can't make it to the conference due to previous engagements, here are some juicy bits about the conference to entice you to go:
    (...)
    - This is a user's conference. Technology is important, but at this
    conference the people who make the products are here to listen, to learn
    how people use the software, and to learn how we can improve it. This
    guarantees that something will actually get done here. It's an important
    role-reversal. (...)
    (...)
    - We're going to talk about how weblogs are used in politics, business,
    journalism, the law, medicine, engineering and education.
    
  • Craig Silverman: Leer Factor : In the wake of the success of Star Académie - an immensely popular and uniquely Québécois take on American Idol - comes Pornstar Académie , which producers hope will be an immensely popular, uniquely Québécois reality porn show. -> As they say: "Faut-il en rire ou en pleurer...". (Hour)
  • BloggerCon: Project outline : Totally in progress
  • Werner Vogels: Putting a Value to a Conference : In the past days there has been some discussion about the registration cost of professional conferences, especially the PDC ($1700) and BloggerCon ($500). The discussion about the PDC is that without question the conference produces value for its fee, but that the fee in itself is just too high for some people. With BloggerCon people remarked with $500 for a one day conference with no history to show for, and a vague semi-technical content its return-on-investment (in contrast to for example the PDC) is questionable.
  • Ken MacLeod: Ken MacLeod's RSS Political FAQ : This Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) page serves as a counterpoint to Dave Winer's RSS 2.0 Political FAQ page. It also provides a place for me, as an individual not as a representative of any other group, to offer my opinion on political or social questions that I can about RDF Site Summary (the other RSS) and the project currently referred to as Pie/Atom/Echo.
  • Object Learning: RSS: A Love Story : I could go on and on about all of the things that make RSS so dreamy. Like, how people can't even agree on what RSS stands for. Some say it is "Rich Site Summary", others claim it should be "Real Simple Syndication." How mysterious! I say, RSS makes my online experience so much better, who cares what it stands for? Love is blind.
  • TheFuss:
    1. Intro
    2. Why the fuss?
    3. What is RSS?
    4. Viewing RSS Content
    5. Connecting Learning Objects via RSS
    6. Implementations
    7. Q&A
    -> A wiki from the University of British Columbia focusing on RSS and learning, good links, up to date, they even link to the Pie/Echo/Atom wiki.
  • Clay Shirky : History, Personalities, Wikis Redux: I have wanted to post in the "what effect has the wiki had on the development of !Echo?" thread, but I haven't, because, somewhat to my surprise, I've been too emotional about the subject. I was put off my feed reading Liz's first post on the subject, because while my analytical self recognizes that her critique of wikis is correct -- they put some users off in ways weblogs or mailing lists do not -- my gut *wants* the !Echo wiki to work, because I love wikis and I think what the !Echo group is trying to do matters. (Corante's MANY-TO-MANY: social software)
  • Ina Fried: Navy to draft Linux-powered Macs : A company that specializes in running Linux on Macs said Wednesday that it has landed a deal to supply the U.S. Navy with 260 Apple Xserve servers. Terra Soft Solutions said the machines will be used as part of a sonar imaging system that defense contractor Lockheed Martin is building for the Navy. Rather than using the Mac OS, the Apple servers will run Terra Soft's Yellow Dog Linux operating system. [via Linux Today] (CNET)

comments: 0

9:54AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Thu 07 Aug 2003

Quick Links - 2003 08 07

Last update: 07/08/03; 09:13:19 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Formerly Echo : Chat Today : Reminder - IRC chat today on WikiGardening , Thursday, August 7, 2003 at 15:30Z on #echo at irc.freenode.net for 90 minutes, then as participation permits.
    Coordinator: Ken MacLeod 
    
    The topic of this chat is to begin the effort of organizing and refactoring the wiki. 
    
    08:30:00 in Los Angeles 
    11:30:00 in New York 
    16:30:00 in London 
    17:30:00 in Rome 
    
  • Joe Gregorio: Extending the AtomAPI : One of the key features of the AtomAPI is it's potential for extensibity. As an example of that kind of extensiblity here in an outline of one way the AtomAPI could be enhanced in a completely safe way by a vendor.
  • INFOWORLD TECH WATCH : Open source advocacy - part 1 : A quiet revolution is getting its act together. A bold proposal called a mutual defense software license is emerging as a type of poison pill for the open source community. The proposal is being developed by Larry Rosen and was supported and articulated today by open source evangelist Bruce Perens at LinuxWorld. In essence, if Linux were licensed under a mutual defense license, any company that sued any single Linux developer would have its rights to use Linux terminated.
  • Loebrich.org: Sam's Wiki's Naming Process Sucks : If debates about XML formats are pretty much pointless, you would think debates about the names for such formats would be even more so, but I'm starting to think that's not the case. Even if I disagree with some of the design decisions, I'll be able to use the format as long as it is well-specified, but the length and process of the naming debate so far just makes the whole enterprise look silly. If anybody is looking for a model for Emergent Democracy , this Wiki thing clearly doesn't work.
  • More Like This WebLog: Taking liberties on the Kiseido Go Server : Kisedo, a publisher of books on Go , runs aGo server . You install a client using Java Web Start, connect to the server, pick a room or a club area, then start a game with someone on the server. -> I played Go a long time ago, but this make me want to start again, Go is probably one of the best game you can ever learn. I still have a wood board and a magnetic one.
  • metamark.net: Metamark Shorten Service : Enter a long url and let us make it short...

comments: 0

8:43AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Wed 06 Aug 2003

Quick Links - 2003 08 06

Last update: 06/08/03; 11:12:08 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Ken MacLeod: Change History for Really Simple Syndication : As is clear from the change notes, Really Simple Syndication has changed names, added several new elements, made backward incompatible changes, allowed the use of extensions through XML Namespaces, and transferred ownership and governance. It has evolved and changed, clearly and unequivocally, and it is clear that it can continue to evolve and change as the advisory board chooses.
  • Michel Dumais: Enough of that "email vs courriel" war : So, as my dear Anglophone friends can see, there's no French plot against US. Languages are living tissue, sometimes, you have to adapt an expression or a word from another country to your culture. There's nothing bad about that, if you respect the origins and the meaning ot that word. After all, you've done the same thing, as the word " mail " is coming from the French word " malle ". Adaptability, flexibility, openess, that's the beauty of living languages who want to stay alive. -> EXCELLENT!!!
  • Mark Pilgrim: Atom 0.2 snapshot : The Atom 0.2 snapshot is out. -> Nice spec, and look at the source of an Atom feed, its readable!
  • Jon Udell: Issue analysis series : I've opened up a new node of the directory here, and have begun to populate it with what I expect will be a series of short articles that identify important issues in the implementation and use of RSS 2.0, summarize the current state of those issues to the best of my understanding, and recommendation strategies. Comments, clarifications, pointers, and contributions are welcome. (Technology at Harvard Law)
  • Bill de hÓra: Community backlash, wikis are fine: A wiki is a collection of living documents that make a space. It's not a version control system, it's not an archive, it's not a cms, it's not fora, it's not a mailing list, it's not the web. Above all, it's not a quick fix for a community's problems - look to yourself before your tools. About the best the wiki will do is expose a community's lack of civility in short order. [via Formely Echo]
  • Joi Ito: Going P-time : Blogs and supporting services like technorati and trackbacks make the publishing of blogs more and more like a conversation where one has to respond to blog posts in hours. For me, responding to blog posts directed at me is more important than email. What IRC and Chat have done is accelerated this even more but has added the ability to see the state of my various friends. Sleeping, waking up, in a meeting, on the phone. When I'm excited about something, I can quickly round up folks in IRC or find people who are available to process in real-time, what used to be scheduled and slower. I can talk to people while an idea is still fresh in my mind and jump from brainstorm to brainstorm. Also, this real-time element allows much richer emotional context. Hanging out on IRC exchanging simple state information like waking up and going to bed creates some sort of "we've hung out together" link between the participants.
  • Six Log: TypePad Preview Release : It gives me great pleasure to report that we have finally launched a public version of TypePad.
  • Jake Savin: TrackBack for Radio : Radio UserLand's supports both outgoing and incoming TrackBack pings. Outgoing pings are made automatically based on links in your weblog posts. Incoming pings are displayed similarly to comments, in a pop-up window via a link next to the post which received the ping.
  • Jeremy Zawodny: mytop 1.4 is released : mytop is a console-based (non-gui) tool for monitoring the threads and overall performance of MySQL 3.22.x, 3.23.x, and 4.x servers. It runs on most Unix systems (including Mac OS X) which have Perl, DBI , and Term::ReadKey installed.
  • Rob Jorgensen: NetNewsWire Search Scripts 1.0 : NetNewsWire Search Scripts is a set of four scripts allows NetNewsWire users to quickly search articles which have been downloaded by NetNewsWire. Search results will be saved in a HTML file which can be opened automatically in the user's default browser after the search or manually at a more convenient time. [via Ranchero Software]
  • Giles Turnbull: Outboard Brains for Mac OS X: This article is going to take a brief look at some applications designed to be digital brain-dumps; electronic Pensieves into which you can throw any information you want, knowing that it will still be there when you need it later. (O'Reilly Mac DevCenter)

comments: 0

8:34AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Tue 05 Aug 2003

Quick Links - 2003 08 05

Last update: 05/08/03; 10:09:06 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • whytheluckystiff.net: What's Shiny and New in Ruby 1.8.0?: Many of 1.8.0's new features have been long awaited by the Ruby crowd. I'm just going to run through a few of my favorite new features that I've longed to have in a stable Ruby version. I'm not going to include all of 1.8.0's features, only the ones that have stuck out to me.
  • Joe Cellini: Tim Bray Search and Deploy: "XML is used for banking transactions, for interchanging prices in condo developments and for exporting data from iTunes," he points out. "None of those things were remotely on our minds when we were building it." (Apple /pro)
  • Ben Hammersley: XML, metaphorically speaking : namespaces are the only concept in XML that can be compared to prose or poetry at all. In fact, to me, it's the concept of namespaces that elevates XML from a rough text envelope for data to a thing of beauty and structure.
  • INFOWORLD TECH WATCH: Welcome to Tech Watch : Bloggers love to talk about how this RSS -empowered medium is changing journalism forever. What's already clear to me is that blogs and 'traditional' news journalism are ideal partners for delivering, aggregating and analyzing news. For example, I'm subscribed to around 50 RSS feeds that deliver content to my news aggregator on a daily basis. What's happening here is that you quickly notice patterns where breaking news around the web feeds blog discussions, and vice versa . So in that context, Tech Watch is a natural fit for InfoWorld's news team . Expect to see us blog from events like trade shows, and link to enterprise IT news around the web with our spin. Some of us might even try to be funny (but don't hold your breath). (InfoWorld)
  • Ken MacLeod: Pie Wiki Gardening Chat: The first scheduled topic chat for Pie/Echo/Atom (aka. The Project) will be a WikiGardening chat, Thursday, August 7, 2003 15:30Z on #echo at irc.freenode.net for 90 minutes, then as participation permits. -> The date is expressed in the ISO 8601 format and the Z stand for GMT or UTC.
  • daholygoat.com: (Not) Applying Design Patterns in PHP: This is what I will try to emphasize on in this article. A lot of design patterns are simply not needed and cause overkill when programming PHP, especially in a web environment. It can even decrease code readability. Why? Because there is often an obvious solution to a problem. PHP is a rather specialized language. It's mainly a web scripting language, let's not forget that. Languages such as C++ or Java are much more general purpose languages, and not very specialized when it comes to web programming/scripting. A lot of design patterns have GUI programming backgrounds or are aimed at languages where strong typing is something you can't get around. That's a different world. It might seem that I'm trying to encourage a certain amount of "hackerism" here. Maybe implicitly. I'm just trying to use PHP's features to their full extent, which happens to diminish the need for using design patterns in my (admittedly) strong opinion. [via PHP Everywhere]

comments: 0

9:13AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Thu 31 Jul 2003

Quick Links - 2003 07 30

Last update: 31/07/03; 15:52:13 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Webfeet Design: Websites and desktop publishing -> If you need a website designer that have great taste, or you are an artist and want to publicize your work, please, have a look at Webfeet Design. Disclaimer: Webfeet Design is the company of my sister-in-law (Hi Anita!).

comments: 0

3:52PM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Wed 30 Jul 2003

Quick Links - 2003 07 30

Last update: 30/07/03; 12:18:35 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Harry Fuecks: PHP5: Coming Soon to a Webserver Near You : In this article I'll be giving you a fairly in depth tour of the important features PHP5 delivers, based on the Beta release. We'll also consider its significance for the future of PHP as a technology. -> A very thorough article on PHP5 in 19 parts, the best intro to PHP5 that I have seen sor far. [via PHPDeveloper.org] (sitepoint)
  • Padawan.info: Balkanise our aggregators : I love Tom's idea to balkanise those tools. I'd love to be able to apply filters on all those "top-stories" aggregators and immediately filter a language, a country or a region in or out of the picture. What's hot among US webloggers? What's up in the EU? Compare things as viewed exclusively by US sites vs. the rest of us (you name it), would be a very valuable tool to better understand the world or, at least, each other.

Politics

  • Zvi Bar'el: Neighbors / The war in Iraq costs a tad more than estimated : Post-war Iraq offers another option to those seeking opportunities: real estate. Apparently Arab businessmen are buying up properties across Iraq in anticipation of a rise in prices, taking advantage of the poverty and willingness of Iraqis to sell just about anything for any price, with no government supervision. "In another year, when we all wake up, we'll suddenly see that Iraq no longer belongs to us," wrote an Iraqi journalist. "It will have gone to Saudi, Kuwaiti, Egyptian and American millionaires. We will be transformed into foreign laborers in our own country." (Haaretz)
  • Jack Shafer: The Times Scoops That Melted. Cataloging the wretched reporting of Judith Miller. : The most important question to unravel about Judith Miller's reporting is this: Has she grown too close to her sources to be trusted to get it right or to recant her findings when it's proved that she got it wrong? Because the Times sets the news agenda for the press and the nation, Miller's reporting had a great impact on the national debate over the wisdom of the Iraq invasion. If she was reliably wrong about Iraq's WMD, she might have played a major role in encouraging the United States to attack a nation that posed it little threat. [via blogdex] (Slate)
  • Dana Milbank and Mike Allen: Iraq Flap Shakes Rice's Image : "If Condi didn't know the exact state of intel on Saddam's nuclear programs . . . she wasn't doing her job," said Brookings Institution foreign policy specialist Michael E. O'Hanlon. "This was foreign policy priority number one for the administration last summer, so the claim that someone else should have done her homework for her is unconvincing.". [via blogdex] (washingtonpost.com)

comments: 0

9:55AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Tue 29 Jul 2003

Quick Links - 2003 07 29

Last update: 29/07/03; 08:46:11 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Aleksey Dolya: Interview with Brian Kernighan : C is perhaps the best balance of expressiveness and efficiency that has ever been seen in programming languages. At the time it was developed, efficiency mattered a great deal: machines were slow and had small memories, so one had to get close to the efficiency of assembler. C did this for system programming tasks--writing compilers, operating systems and tools. It was so close to the machine that you could see what the code would be (and it wasn't hard to write a good compiler), but it still was safely above the instruction level and a good enough match to all machines that one didn't think about specific tricks for specific machines. Once C came along, there no longer was any reason for any normal programmer to use assembly language. It's still my favorite language; if I were marooned on a desert island with only one compiler, it would have to be for C. (Linux Journal)
  • Lawrence Lessig: <free culture> : Over the past three years, Lessig has given more than 100 talks like the one captured here. On July 24, 2002, at the O.Reilly Open Source Conference he announced this would be one of his last. (...) This Flash presentation combines Lawrence Lessig's original 243-slide presentation (on the current state of intellectual property and its ramifications on creativity and culture) timed against the audio of his OSCON 2002 keynote address.
  • The Disenchanted Developer: TAR File Management With PHP Archive_Tar : This tutorial deals with (...) the Archive_Tar class. This is not a tool you might be familiar with, it's not even a tool that you'll use on a regular basis. However, in case you ever need a way to build a TAR archive through PHP code, it's an invaluable addition to your PHP armory. (Developer Shed)
  • Michael J. Radwin: One Year of PHP at Yahoo! -> Slides presented at the O'Reilly Open Source Convention, Portland, Oregon, July 9, 2003 [via PHP Complete]
  • Joe Clark: Manually Expiring Web Pages : After going through a series of pages during a registration process, you don't want the user to be able to go back after the final submit. What can you do to manually "expire" those pages, and perhaps display a custom message? [via PHPDeveloper.org] (PHPBuilder)
  • Artur Maj: Securing PHP: Step-by-step : This article shows the basic steps in securing PHP, one of the most popular scripting languages used to create dynamic web pages. (SecurityFocus)
  • rubyforge.org: Welcome to RubyForge: RubyForge is a home for open source Ruby projects.

comments: 0

8:35AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Tue 22 Jul 2003

Quick Links - 2003 07 22

Last update: 22/07/03; 09:01:19 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Ken MacLeod: A RESTful Web Interface: One of the smaller yet surprisingly significant issues in the development of one of the Pie/Echo/Atom reference interfaces is a decision between the full suite of HTTP methods (like GET, PUT, POST, and DELETE, and potentially those in WebDAV ) and just two methods (GET and POST). Tim Bray proposes the latter in his ongoing essay, A Web Interface for Web Publishing . This essay presents a sample implementation of the former.
  • HELIOS: HELIOS Xtar - Ultimate UNIX batch HFS disk backup/clone utility for Mac OS X : HELIOS Xtar saves each HFS file as two files in the standard tar container format to preserve all additional information. During a restore with Xtar on an HFS volume, the resource and finder information will be restored into a valid HFS files containing all information. This means there is no missing data, e.g. the volume is bootable after being restored.

comments: 0

9:05AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Mon 21 Jul 2003

Quick Links - 2003 07 21

Last update: 21/07/03; 14:50:05 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • raelity bytes: Announcing Blosxom 2. : I'm thrilled to announce that Blosxom 2.0 has been released today. For those not in the know, blosxom (pronounced "blossom") is a lightweight yet feature-packed weblog application designed from the ground up with simplicity, usability, and interoperability in mind. (...) Also launching today is the new and improved blosxom.com. The site features updated, augmented, and just plain new documentation and an easier path download, installation, configuration, and blogging -- not to mention the snazzy layout. And the whole kit and kaboodle is built on and powered by Blosxom using nothing but what comes on board and the power of a selection of user-contributed plugins; for the niggly-naggly details, take a gander at the colophon.
  • I'm back! I should take a break like this more often. When you cut for some times your umbilical cord to the net, it give you more perspectives on life, the world and that kind of things :). I'm glad to see that RSS 2.0 is moving as well (not)Atom aka (not)Echo.
  • John Robb: Thanks for all the e-mails (there have been a huge number) of support for me as I recover from the outage at UserLand. [via Roland Tanglao]

Politics

  • New-York Times Editorial: A Bloody Peace in Iraq : Most of the administration's critics predicted that Washington would win the war but botch the peace, and so far they have turned out to be disturbingly prescient.

comments: 0

8:59AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Fri 04 Jul 2003

Quick Links - 2003 07 04

Last update: 04/07/03; 11:45:08 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Georg Bauer: Comment on "Fun with XSLT": A XSLT script to translate Necho to XML-RPC serialization will be possible, but won't help with XML-RPC API at all. The reason being that XML-RPC APIs are function libraries much like local dynamic-link libraries are. If you use XML-RPC, you never directly touch the XML source at all. XML-RPC is just remote procedure calls that happen to use XML for serialization and HTTP for transport, but the programmer calls functions and passes on data structures. So what is needed isn't a translation of the underlying XML, as that won't help anybody, but what is needed is a standard way of translating the Necho structures to actual data structures using the simple types and compound types that XML-RPC knows of (so you can use int, float, string, datetime for simple types and list, structure for compound types). I did something like this in http://intertwingly.net/wiki/pie/SampleXmlrpc down in the bottom in my Python example. I voted +1 on the "do REST first, XML-RPC/SOAP can be derived from that", because the transfer from Necho structure to data structure can be made automatically. It's just not possible with XSLT ;-) It's quite funny how many people discuss XML-RPC in the Wiki and even vote to dump it, without actually knowing what XML-RPC is and how it is used. This is especially funny since XML-RPC is definitely the standard protocol basis of today for all blogging APIs, so one would think that people know what they are talking about ;-)
  • Google's "I'm Feeling Lucky": http://www.google.com/search?q=Weapons+of+Mass+Destruction&btnI=I%27m+Feeling+Lucky (Anthony Cox) [via Michel Dumais]
  • SIX LOG: About.com, powered by Movable Type: We're excited to let everybody know that the hundreds of expert guides who publish topic-specific sites on About.com are now all using Movable Type to manage their sites. [via Michel Dumais]
  • Joe Gregorio: EchoAPI RFC - Meeting Tim's Challenge : I have posted a rough draft, in RFC format, of a similar publishing API using not-Echo . I have also created a discussion area on the wiki for this proposal.
  • Sam Ruby's Wiki: XmlRpcDiscussion : [SjoerdVisscher ] I think we can use the general idea from the MetaWeblog API: apply a given set of rules to convert XML data to the XML-RPC model. The problem with the MetaWeblog API is that the XML data model isn't clear enough: If an element can occur more than once, the member in the struct has to contain an array. But it is not clear enough in RSS which items are allowed to occur more than once. Necho doesn't have this problem, because it has a schema. It would be very easy to create an XSLT that converts a Necho document into an XML-RPC document. It would even be doable to create an XSLT that converts the Necho schema to a Necho-to-XML-RPC XSLT. The bottomline: let's first create a RESTful API. The SOAP and XML-RPC APIs can then easily be derived from that. [SamRuby ] This seems like an excellent way to proceed.
  • Adriaan Tijsseling: Echo annoyances : I'm getting a bit annoyed with the way the Echo project is going. It is a great project and the basic concept is one to pursue and support. Unfortunately, there has been a bit too much squabble about protocols. There are advantages to using REST or SOAP over XML-RPC, but in the end, does it really matter? We all seem to forget that, ultimately, it is all about the customers, the people creating, maintaining, and using weblogs. -> Adriaan Tijsseling is the author of Kung-Log, an OS X application "to posts and manage entries of MovableType, Serendipity, IlohaBlog, Nucleus weblog systems".
  • Tim Bray: On Nations : Yes, you can get a Canadian flag, but that's for Canadian-French, the slash key is for é or something, it's unusable by hackers. -> Hey Tim, you can hack when you choose this keyboard layout, but you have to have the keyboard that can go with it :). Press option-é to get the slash. I must admit that the basic English keyboard layout is better for hacking (I have two other computers on my desk running FreeBSD and Win2000 that use that kind of keyboard, and the latter don't have a Windows key), but the Canadian-French keyboard is the one that use all the day to code. And I don't have a Canadian flag either staring all day at me...

comments: 0

8:53AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Thu 03 Jul 2003

Quick Links - 2003 07 03

Last update: 03/07/03; 14:15:45 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Georg Bauer: XML-RPC vs. REST : There is some discussion over wether to support XML-RPC interfaces for the new Necho API, or to just provide REST as protocol. In the following I try to discuss those two options.
  • Ben Hammersley: Echo...echo...alright enough already: The one thing that interests me about the API section of the Echo effort, however, is the effect it will have on the weblogging companies themselves. SixApart, Blogger and LiveJournal have already signed up, which brings the vast majority of active bloggers. Blosxom support will come as sure as day follows night, and we might even see Userland join in too. Given enough will, everyone could be embracing the same API - which would be marvellous for the user, but completely disastrous for many of the weblogging companies. An API that can transfer entries from one system to another without fuss would introduce a frictionless market to weblog tools. If the market can move entries from Radio to Movable Type to Blogger and back again without losing anything, then the market will naturally gravitate towards the combination of the best and the cheapest. Until now, doing so would have cost time and effort, but given a complete Echo spec, the launch of a new product could gut a lesser rival's customer base in a matter of hours. Tools to allow this will emerge, I can guarantee it. Certain companies had better start looking at providing a whole load more features that can't be transferred via the standards they so crave - lest the CMS they charge for today becomes a valueless commodity through their own success tomorrow.
  • Brent Simmons: Jul 03 2003: I'm spending too much time on Echo, and I'm disappointed with it. The momentum is definitely with people who think of weblog syndication and editing as a blank slate.
  • Jake Savin: Use XML-RPC: Evan cites Ben Trott's "Why we need Echo" reasoning for not using XML-RPC. Ben has updated the page since it was originally posted, with a note that the internationalization issue has been resolved -- basically the same resolution now listed in the Wiki's first reason for not using XML-RPC. As far as I can tell, this is Evan's only reason for using SOAP over XML-RPC, and it's a red herring. Lastly, Evan notes parenthetically that the decision to use SOAP over XML-RPC was "made collectively by the designers of Echo". As far as I can tell, no such consensus has yet been reached, and SOAP isn't even the only alternative to XML-RPC. To say now that Blogger will favor SOAP over XML-RPC is at least jumping the gun.
  • Sam Ruby: XML-RPC, SOAP, and/or REST : My current leanings matches Mark Baker's: don't want any RPC interface, be it XML-RPC or SOAP. Gimme a RESTful interface, optionally RESTful SOAP. - however, I would like to see more data before I cast my vote.
  • Tim Bray: A Web Interface for Web Publishing : If we define a Web API along these lines, and others built on XML-RPC and/or SOAP, I bet that a competent programmer is going to be able to bash out a publishing system through the Web API quicker than the XML-RPCniks or SOAPsters, and it'll be less complicated, and it'll be easier to understand and maintain.
  • Ric Ford: The Future of MacInTouch : If MacInTouch is something that has ever given you value, I need your help to keep it going in its present form. If you're a reader who has benefitted from our information, please make a donation . If you're a buyer, please buy from MacInTouch advertisers. If you have a Macintosh product or service, please consider our advertising opportunities.
  • bloglines.com: Welcome to Bloglines!: Bloglines is a free service that makes it easy to keep up with your favorite blogs and newsfeeds. With Bloglines, you can subscribe to the RSS feeds of your favorite blogs, and Bloglines will monitor updates to those sites. You can read the latest entries easily within Bloglines. Unlike other aggregators which require you to download and install software, Bloglines runs on our servers and requires no installation. Because your Bloglines account is accessible through a web browser, you can access your account from any Internet-connected machine. See the overview for more information.
  • Zeev Suraski: Ask the Experts - About the Future of PHP : The PHP experts are here to answer your questions about the Zend Engine 2 and PHP 5. Who better than those developing the Zend Engine 2 and PHP 5 to answer your burning questions and give you the inside scoop? Submit your question and we will post it and the answer on Zend.com and in the Zend Monthly Newsletter.

comments: 0

10:51AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Wed 02 Jul 2003

Quick Links - 2003 07 02

Last update: 02/07/03; 13:12:39 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Brent Simmons : Blogger: We are moving away from XML-RPC : The Blogger folks continue: "If you choose to take advantage of the capabilities of the new API, you will need to use SOAP instead of XML-RPC. This was a difficult decision (made collectively by the designers of Echo), because there is a lot of investment in XML-RPC in the blogging tool space, and it is great for getting things done quickly." Okay, if this is true, I totally missed it. My fault. Will the Echo API mandate SOAP rather than XML-RPC?
  • Sam Ruby: necho 0.1 : I've taken a 2003/07/01 snapshot of the maximal example of the format previously known as echo.  The reason for this exercise is that I plan to start prototyping using this as a baseline.  I invite others to do likewise.
  • Blogger Developers Network : Blogger API Update  : As the first post to this blog (which also inaugurated this new developer's section of blogger.com) indicates, we became very interested in a new proposal that has recently been in the works by a bunch of smart engineer-types of the blogging world. We felt, if it worked out, this new spec (code-named "Echo"), would solve a lot of potential problems with our API, as well as with the blog syndication format we support, RSS. It would do so in an elegant way, specifically designed for blogging. And, even better, a way that was unified with other major blogging tool vendors. Consequently, our developers got involved with the Echo (to be renamed) project to make sure we felt it would work for our needs, as well as everyone else's. We are very pleased with the technical progress made so far and are committed to help the project reach conclusion.

comments: 0

9:42AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Tue 01 Jul 2003

Quick Links - 2003 07 01

Last update: 01/07/03; 17:31:41 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Rogers Cadenhead's comment: comment# 32: UserLand tools (Radio and Manila) do not, by default, produce [link] at all; they use [guid] to express permalinks, and [link] to express external links. Actually, if you leave the Link field blank in Radio, it puts the entry's permalink in both the LINK and GUID elements, as shown in my RSS 2.0 feed. So in spite of what Dave would like to see, at present Radio supports the duplication of LINK and GUID that I'm suggesting here. Clearly Dave feels like he owns the Userland branch of RSS, and can do with it what he will. UserLand owns the RSS 2.0 specification and disclaims any ownership of the format it describes. We're demonstrating this point now on SSF-DEV by writing a new spec. Leave RSS alone (Mark Pilgrim)
  • Rogers Cadenhead's comment: Though I agree with the general principle that community-driven formats are better, Dann, the fact remains that RSS, XML-RPC, OPML, and other protocols are extremely popular and widely implemented, yet were shepherded along primarily (or solely) by UserLand. Doesn't that negate the notion that a sense of ownership is always a necessity? RSS and Echo (John Robb's Radio Weblog)
  • Fredrik Lundh: XML-RPC and the ASCII limitation : Dave's answer was clear: XML-RPC is XML, and you can use any character XML allows you to use.
  • Dave Winer: XML-RPC Specification : Updated 6/30/03 DW Removed "ASCII" from definition of string.
  • Georg Bauer: XML-RPC and the ASCII limitation ::: www.effbot.org : The problem is in the fact that almost all Userland software abuses the spec in the way that they don't give correct charset encodings in XML-RPC stuff. They send ISO-8859-1 chars without declaring the XML stuff as ISO-8859-1 - this doesn't validate (XML charset by default is UTF-8 and many 8bit chars are not valid prefix codes in UTF-8), so you have to patch headers and parsers to communicate with Userland software (RCS or Radio), as the results from RCS or the requests and results from Radio (I am on the receiving side of Radio if I work on the Python Community Server ) won't be allowed by validating XML parsers.
  • Second p0st: Invalid XML-RPC from Radio / Frontier : There's a really simple solution here; the UserLand XML-RPC formatter needs to generate the above XML header (specifying ISO-8859-1 format) rather than the default one (implying UTF-8 format) when generating XML-RPC requests.

comments: 0

10:05AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Sun 22 Jun 2003

Quick Links - 2003 06 22

Last update: 22/06/03; 07:29:30 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • bradchoate.com: RSS 2 Dates and Such: As a developer, I totally agree that ISO 8601 is easier to parse. It's just a better way to represent a timestamp for computers to read. That's a technical reason for using the Dublin Core date element, but not a terribly compelling reason to abandon native RSS 2 elements. And, honestly, "either way works, but we like doing it this way" is not a compelling reason either. [via Scripting News]
  • MagpieRSS: MagpieRSS provides an XML-based (expat) RSS parser in PHP: MagpieRSS is compatible with RSS .9 through RSS 1.0, and supports the RSS 1.0's modules. (with a few exceptions).

comments: 0

7:25AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Sat 21 Jun 2003

Quick Links - 2003 06 21

Last update: 22/06/03; 07:04:07 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Robert McMillan: Sam Ruby's job is to see into the future of Web services : I think they [REST and Web services] actually can play nice together. You can actually say, "I will use REST to describe how objects are accessed," and then use SOAP to talk about how those objects are represented. One interesting thing is that REST stands for Representational State Transfer, and one thing that REST does not talk at all about is how you actually represent the state, despite the fact that that's the name. Conversely, Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) does not talk about any way in which you access objects; it just talks about how you represent state and do transfer. So, you have two groups of people not talking to one another, but talking past each other. If you actually combine the best ideas of both, you end up with an extensible and modular and loosely coupled system. -> See also Sam Ruby's blog. (IBM DeveloperWorks) [via Roland Tanglao]
  • Meta pkg: Packaging groups coordinate efforts to deliver software for Mac OS X : June 20, 2003 -- The Fink, Gentoo, and DarwinPorts projects are pleased to announce the formation of a cooperative development alliance forged to facilitate delivery of freely available software to Mac OS X. Under this new alliance, the projects will share information and coordinate efforts for porting software to Apple's Mac OS X and Darwin operating systems. Members of the alliance will share information using the www.metapkg.org Web site, which will provide a home for this cooperative effort. [via Flip's weblog]
  • dive into mark: History of RSS date format : I want to talk about prior art. But I can't do that yet, because first I need to give my opinion about this "funky RSS " business. It's FUD. It's crap. Cut it out. It's exactly the sort of thing that everyone hates Microsoft for: talking trash about competitors, making vague threats of incompatibility, and scaring end users in the process. (If you don't know what I'm talking about, trust me, you don't want to know. Stop reading right now before you get sucked into this world.)
  • Ranchero Software: What's New in NetNewsWire 1.0.3 : NetNewsWire 1.0.3 includes a new Combined View option -- it puts titles and descriptions together rather than separating them. By putting the titles and descriptions together, you can read the news more like a web page. It goes beyond just being like a web page, though -- you can navigate using the arrow keys and space bar as in the traditional view and you can expand and collapse descriptions.

comments: 0

9:11AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Fri 20 Jun 2003

Quick Links - 2003 06 20

Last update: 20/06/03; 10:07:58 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Tim Bray : RSS: Promise and Peril : Mr Safe: Yes, and I suppose the people behind them are working together constructively to bring order to the landscape.
    Tim: Well, actually, the dialogue tends to devolve into childish name-calling. But the stuff does still seem to work really well.
    Mr Safe: Hmm. In any case, there's a nice thorough precise write-up--you call them RFCs, don't you--that I can give my programmers, right?
    Tim: Well, actually, not really. One of the two versions requires you to understand RDF/XML, which is really hard, and the other doesn't bother to define a lot of the behavior or defaults. But like I said, we all manage to kind of get along and interoperate.
  • Bruno Pedro : Transforming XML with PHP : This article compares two methods of transforming XML in PHP: PEAR's XML_Transformer package and the W3C XML transformation language XSLT. I will first describe the PEAR project and its philosophy, with a focus on its XML transformation techniques. I will then give a brief introduction to XSLT and the way to use it from PHP. (XML.com) [via More Like This WebLog]
  • Simon Willison: Easier form validation with PHP : Let's talk about form validation. Here's what I would class as the ideal validation system for a form in a web application: (1) The form is displayed; you fill it in. (2) You submit the form to the server. (3) If you missed something out or provided invalid input, the form is redisplayed pre-filled with the valid data you already entered . (4) The redisplayed form tells you what you got wrong. It also flags the fields that were incorrect. (5) Loop until you fill the form in correctly. (...) My latest attempt (sparked by this article on Evolt) involves embedding validation and redisplay rules in the markup of the form itself. The form is written in XHTML , but with a number of additional tags and elements. Any form field elements can have a number of additional attributes which specify the validation rules of the form. [via More Like This WebLog]
  • Sterling Hughes: Cool Stuff : Send me cool stuff related to programming.

comments: 0

10:06AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Thu 19 Jun 2003

Quick Links - 2003 06 19

Last update: 19/06/03; 09:22:35 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Daniel Lyons: What SCO Wants, SCO Gets : like many religious folk, the Linux-loving crunchies in the open-source movement are a) convinced of their own righteousness, and b) sure the whole world, including judges, will agree. They should wake up. SCO may not be very good at making a profit by selling software. (Last year the company lost $24.9 million on sales of $64.2 million.) But it is very good at getting what it wants from other companies. And it has a tight circle of friends. (Forbes)
  • Michael Yoon: ArsDigita: An Alternate Perspective : I didn't want to admit to myself that we were on the road to failure, that we had dug ourselves so deep into the red, and that our plan for saving the company was, more or less, wishful thinking. Also, I was complacent: I liked many of the people I worked with, and I was making a good salary, so maintaining the status quo wasn't hard. Finally, I didn't have any better ideas. [via Slashdot]

Politics

  • Australian IT: Vietnamese 'cyber-dissident' jailed : His [Pham Hong Son] arrest was part of the government's ongoing crackdown against intellectuals and dissidents who use the Internet to circulate news or opinion banned from the tightly controlled state press. About a million Vietnamese are estimated to have regular access to the web, mainly through internet cafes, but many sites such as those of exiled opposition groups are firewalled.

comments: 0

9:20AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Wed 18 Jun 2003

Quick Links - 2003 06 18

Last update: 18/06/03; 15:49:13 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Heilan' Coo: MacCVSClient 1.8: A free multithreaded CVS client with Mac OS look and feel. It shows your sandbox in an intuitive hierarchical list view so that you are aware of every file's status anytime. File logs are shown in hierarchical log views with quick access to file content diffs. Enhanced file annotations show related commit log messages. File differences and change conflicts are shown in special colour coded views. The add/import preview helps to avoid file corruption when adding new items to a repository. [via Macintouch]
  • technorati.com: Technorati Developers Site : This is the Technorati Developers Playground. It is set up as a Wiki so that developers (and others) can contribute and become equal participants in the development of the site.
  • There Is No Cat: Da Funkidator! : Da Funkidator funkidates RSS feeds to tell whether or not they're funky. [via phil ringnalda] -> See Sam Ruby site or this Dave Winer post for more background.

comments: 0

10:52AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

Tue 17 Jun 2003

Quick Links - 2003 06 17

Last update: 17/06/03; 10:58:48 EDT

Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

  • Brent Simmons: NetNewsWire1.0.3b1 : The Combined View wouldn't exist without the work and ideas of other people. Radio UserLand and other browser-based aggregators display news in a similar fashion, with titles and descriptions together. Jason Kottke suggested this feature for NetNewsWire, and even did a quick mock-up of how it might look.

Politics

  • Bradley Burston: Background / Has Sharon's Hamas hitlist converted Bush? : "American pressure truly plays no role in Hamas reckoning," [Zvi] Bar'el adds. "America has no leverage that would make Hamas panic. What Israel does is also of no consequence, because it has been fighting Hamas since it was founded in the late 1980s. So Hamas can dismiss out of hand what America does, or what Israel does. But it cannot dismiss the Palestinian public. In this regard, Hamas certainly has good reasons for concern at the moment, with the slow but perceptible development of a peace process, Bar'el says. "When Palestinians begin to see the possibility of going out to work from the Gaza Strip's main Erez exit to Israel, when people begin to sense an improvement in their plight, they will oppose attacks that can bring this to an end." As a result, the trigger for the Rantisi "hit" - a joint Hamas-Islamic Jihad-Fatah operation in which gunmen posed as workers leaving Erez, then killed four IDF soldiers in a nearby army position - actually sapped Hamas support. Palestinians reacted with great anger to the operation, viewing it as an attack on their own opportunity to go out and make a living, Bar'el says. "People were clearly greatly disappointed at being unable to go out to work in Israel. Today the ambition of the Palestinian public is to go to work, to make a living, and therefore, to see the peace process advance. "To the Palestinian population, it did not matter that the attack was presented as a 'symbol of the unity of the struggle.' While the attack was going on, seven thousand Palestinians were standing waiting to pass the terminal gates into Israel, only to be turned away because of the shooting. (Haaretz)
  • comments: 0

    10:55AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Mon 16 Jun 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 06 16

    Last update: 16/06/03; 09:43:46 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • PHP Complete: Is Java really more scalable than PHP? : (...) one of the methods to achieving truly scalable architectures is the shared nothing approach. Shared nothing means that "neither memory nor peripheral storage is shared among processors". This makes it highly scalable because no single server can be the bottleneck of the whole system. Then PHP's decision to disallow application variables and the like makes a lot of sense.
    • Jake Savin: Frontier 9.1b3 application available : Frontier 9.1b3 includes a new regular expressions implementation at system.verbs.builtins.re, contributed by Andre Radke. These verbs, based on Philip Hazel's PCRE , provide improved performance over the Regex extension provided with previous releases. Docs for the new verbs, as well as developer docs for migrating from the regex extension are at system.verbs.builtins.re.docs. (Documentation will be added to the DocServer site when Frontier 9.1 is released.)
    • Mac OS X Security (by Potter, Norvell, Wotring - New Riders): Chapter 3 - Mac OS X Client General Security Practices -> Sample chapter.

    comments: 0

    9:41AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Fri 13 Jun 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 06 13

    Last update: 13/06/03; 09:19:24 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • PHP Everywhere: Java addicts start smoking PHP... : An PHP is much worse than Java. PHP allows you to kod without any classy chicks with da big objects up there. PHP don't care what type you are, white, black, integer or itty-bitty bit. And PHP is bad, so bad - even if u dont init yar vars - yar code will still run and u can still git high. And no one can catch the pushers; they just disappear, cos PHP is run-time, you know. It suck you in, suck you in, just u wait. Dont say i never warned u java folks. Dont say nothin. I warned u. Just u wait.
    • Michael Bailey: PHP Output Buffering : Output buffering is a powerful tool in PHP which allows you to buffer a script's output. You can then edit this buffer before returning it to the client. This tutorial will procede first by enumerating the functions used in output buffering with a brief explanation of each. Then we will examine how these functions are utililized. We will conclude with three brief examples of scenerios where one might use output buffering. [via PHPDeveloper.org] (Codewalkers)
    • Leo C. Singleton IV: Application Variables in PHP : Application variables in ASP work very similar to the $_SESSION variable in PHP. However, unlike the $_SESSION variable, application variables are not specific to an individual user; they persist across every user of every page on the web site.
    • Randal Schwartz: A Great Find : Recently, Richard Clamp was inspired to write a wrapper around File::Find called File::Find::Rule that turns the actions of descending into a directory into more of a filter model. A rule object is created and a series of methods are called against it to set up ever-narrowing filters, separating those items of interest from the rest. (Linux Magazine)

    Politics

    • BBC News: Iraqi women 'forced to veil' : The spokesman for the UN Children's Fund, Geoffrey Keele, said that in some areas there had also been pressure on schoolgirls to start putting on the veil. "It's an issue of people's rights - it's an issue not only of women's rights, but human rights - and people have a right to choose whether or not they wear the veil, what religion they practise, how they practise that religion," he told the BBC.
    • Ilene R. Prusher: In freer Iraq, new curbs on women's wear : The sign goes on to state that pants, jeans, or culottes are also not allowed. With such notices popping up in various places, several women complain that they fear things are getting worse, not better, as a result of the US-led invasion. (csmonitor.com)
    • Ben Lynfield: Can Abbas survive the crossfire?: Mr. Fares, the Palestinian legislator, says the demand that Abbas immediately confront militants is unrealistic not only because PA forces have been badly damaged during the two years of fighting, but more importantly because Abbas needs time to gain popularity and credibility. "The only thing that can give him the credibility is for him to be able to point towards hope and a better future," says Fares. "What the Israelis are doing to him is tying up his hands and legs and throwing him into the sea, while at the same time asking him not to get wet." (csmonitor.com)

    comments: 0

    8:58AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Thu 12 Jun 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 06 12

    Last update: 12/06/03; 17:00:52 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • dive into mark: How to consume RSS safely : First of all, I apologize to those of you who subscribe to my RSS feed and use web-based or browser-based news aggregators. If you checked your news page in the last 12 hours, you no doubt saw my little prank: an entire screen full of platypuses. (Please, let's not turn this into a discussion of proper pluralization. Try to stay with me.) They're gone from my feed now, although depending on your software you may need to delete the post in question from your local news page as well. Now that the contrition is out of the way, let's face facts: if this prank affected you, your software is dangerously broken. It accepts arbitrary HTML from potentially 100s of sources and blindly republishes it all on a single page on your own web server (or desktop web server). This is fundamentally dangerous. -> Well, it seems that Radio UserLand is a prime target for this kind of exploit. Would have been better to talk first to the aggregators vendors about this? Showing an exploit to the general public before warning privately the implementors is bad netiquette IMO (and quite dangerous too). Although its good to know about this exploit, it will probably fall again in a conflicting dispute between two (or more) personalities. Maybe Mark warned UserLand and others aggregators vendors about this. I hope so.
      Update: Hmm, it seems that this exploit is well known. Mark Pilgrim gave me a list of links on his blog that discuss it. See in particular this one, this one and this one. But beside this, I think that Mark should have proceed more cautiously by, for example, setting a distinct RSS feed just to show the exploit. There is a lot of end users that didn't understand what happened, and some other geeks that are quite angry about this little prank. But OTH, this is generating on Mark's blog a healthy discussion about all the exploits that can be set in a RSS feeds.
    • Zend: Zend Teams With Sun Microsystems To Initiate Specification for PHP and WebScripting Access to Java™ Technology : San Francisco, CA, June 11, 2003 - Zend Technologies Ltd ., the creator of the PHP scripting engine, and provider of solutions to Develop, Protect and Scale enterprise PHP applications, today announced their participation in a Java™ Specification Request (JSR) initiative with Sun Microsystems to create a standard method for accessing Java-based systems from scripting languages. The initiative is an important step in further strengthening PHP adoption by enterprises. Furthermore, it paves the way for standards-based middleware products that will provide scalable integration between PHP front-end web applications and Java business logic.
    • Jennifer Vesperman : Running Arbitrary Scripts Under CVS : This article is about the hooks CVS includes to allow you to expand it and integrate it with other tools. Five files in the CVSROOT directory of the repository enable you to run arbitrary scripts when a file is committed or tagged. Common uses for these files include interfacing CVS to a bug management system, a change tracker, or another tool; enforcing compliance with a project policy; and triggering processes such as automated export programs.
    • Celsius1414 : PHPosxom 0.7a Speed Demo : Want a sense of the speed gains with the new PHPosxom? Check this demo out , keeping in mind there is still a lot of work to do bringing feature parity. (...) BTW, all of the docs are available at the moment over on the PHPosxom SourceForge development site, although they'll need some editing as 0.7 approaches.

    comments: 0

    9:05AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Wed 11 Jun 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 06 11

    Last update: 11/06/03; 09:29:46 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • owasp.org: Introducing the OWASP Top Ten : The Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP) is dedicated to helping organizations understand and improve the security of their web applications and web services. This list was created to focus government and industry on the most serious of these vulnerabilities.
    • David Sklar: PHP and the OWASP Top Ten Security Vulnerabilities : The Open Web Application Security Project released a helpful document that lists what they think are the top ten security vulnerabilities in web applications. These vulnerabilities can, of course, exist in PHP applications. Here are some tips on how to avoid them.

    comments: 0

    9:29AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Tue 10 Jun 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 06 10

    Last update: 10/06/03; 10:41:57 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • Tim O'Reilly: Print Numbers and Sales Expectations : (...) in terms of calculating your expectations, the vast majority of our books sell between 10,000 and 30,000 copies in a given edition. At average prices, discounts, and royalty rates, that means that you can probably expect to earn somewhere between $15,000 and $60,000 by writing an O'Reilly book. We have more than a few authors, though, who have been both extraordinarily productive and good at picking the right topics, who consistently earn royalties in the mid-six figures, and have made millions of dollars over the lifetimes of their books. And there can be collateral benefits as well, as many authors have enhanced a training or consulting business with the reputation that's come from writing an O'Reilly book.
    • Dave Winer : RSS Resources Directory -> For RSS 2.0.
    • Jason Deraleau: Bypassing the Mac OS X GUI : Verbose booting shows you the actual process of Mac OS X's startup. You'll see drivers get loaded and services launch. This command should work on any recent (New World) Macintosh: sudo /usr/sbin/nvram boot-args="-v" . The -v flag tells the system to boot verbosely. You can get the same result by holding Command + V at boot time, but that will only work the one time. Modifying the boot-args will cause Mac OS X to always boot verbosely from now on.
    • Scott Long : FreeBSD 5.1-RELEASE Announcement : It is my great privilege and pleasure to announce the availability of FreeBSD 5.1-RELEASE. This release continues FreeBSD on the path of advanced multiprocessor and application thread support and includes many improved and widely-sought features: experimental 1:1 and M:N thread libraries provide kernel support for efficient application multithreading, support for Physical Address Extensions enables Pentium Pro and higher CPUs to access up to 64GB of RAM, experimental Name Service Switch infrastructure allows enterprises to seamlessly integrate with LDAP and Active Directory services, enhanced "jail" management, allowing one server to provide many different "virtual machines" with reduced administrator workload, new device drivers include support for IBM/Adaptec ServeRAID controllers, expanded support for USB 2.0 and USB, etc...

    comments: 0

    10:36AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Tue 06 May 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 05 06

    Last update: 06/05/03; 15:26:39 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • Danny Ayers : SSR-Enabling an RSS 2.0 Module : Coming back to syndication - there are semantics in RSS but they are very limited in scope. But if you view RSS more as a way of defining channels or pipelines for potentially any kind of information, it gets a lot more interesting. The basic RSS pieces like item (effectively the URI), title & date just become a bare minimum you're likely to want to know about something. Anything.
    • Sam Ruby : Evolution of the Weblog APIs : This document explores as a fairly low level the evolution of the weblog APIs. -> Update.
    • Diego Doval: blogging APIs: a mini how-to : One thing that makes weblog APIs hard to "grasp" is that, while the specifications are complete, there are few examples, and it's not clear outright how to make a call for the various things one might do with the API (Although the specs usually do provide examples). -> Check also the comments in this thread with the usual suspects: Dave Winer, Sam Ruby, Brent Simmons, Karl Dubost and others. (see for reference: a review of blogging APIs)
    • ootips.org: Object Orientation Tips: Welcome to ootips - a free service devoted to object oriented technologies. The purpose of ootips is to allow developers to keep up-to-date with object oriented technologies, without having to read through high volume, low signal-to-noise sources. I try to extract the most useful and interesting posts from other mailing lists, newsgroups and web forums, and post about one article every week or two.
    • azeem.azhar.co.uk: Google bought Applied Semantics: so what? : Information retrieval is the core of all search businesses. It is about creating software that solves a hard question: getting computers to understand human language with all its vagaries. [via zboïng!]
    • blambot.com: Blambot Comic Fonts & Lettering : Hi. Me Blambot X77i Model GRU1. Me not so good with humans. So... below you see Sound Effects fonts. For words like BLAM! and AAAAAARGH!. [via Celsius1414]
    • mactips.info: Eudora Tips for Macintosh : Eudora Tips focuses on using Qualcomm's Eudora software on the Macintosh. -> I have googled this because I had to many spam from "Some Bozo" and couldn't find in these messages where the "Some Bozo" was coming from. Now I know.
    • weblogg-ed: Using Weblogs in Education [via Roland Tanglao]

    Politics

    • Scott Peterson : Iraqi teen shares her diary of war : Wednesday, March 26 - At 1:35p.m: The sky turned red-colored as if it were the blood of innocent people.... It's truly sad for the innocent Iraqis and the Americans dying without a cause, with the sky pouring dirt on the streets. The sky is upset.... (...) Monday April 14 - At 1:55 p.m., the twins come home and say Americans are walking on the street, and writing their names on children's hands. Hibba's hands have soldiers' names written on them. [The twins] say the soldiers were nice and both are pleased with this happy meeting. Are they really nice? Nobody knows but God. (csmonitor.com)
    • Kanan Makiya: What I Saw When I Went Home: The Wasteland : In Iraq, the world's most powerful military crushed the hated rule of a despot. When U.S. Marines reached Baghdad, Iraqis cheered. Barely two weeks later, however, what Iraqis see before them is a foreign army that has de facto control over their country but has not facilitated the reconstitution of basic order. There is a naïve belief stalking some corridors of power in Washington today that, since the United States has liberated Iraq, it can now stand aside and let flowers bloom. This, supposedly, is democracy. Iraqis have no idea what to make of this bizarre conception. And, as confusion and disorder grow, creating a power vacuum, some of the most dangerous and illiberal groups in Iraq are amassing power. -> Account of an Iraqi member of the Iraqi National Congress (INC). (english.daralhayat.com)
    • Brian Behlendorf: So, I've not blogged much about the whole Iraq situation. It's been almost entirely because I am, like many people I know, terribly conflicted about it, even now after our supposed victory - perhaps especially now. As someone put it to me recently, "if you're not conflicted and confused, if you think there is a clear position to take, you're not thinking hard enough about it."

    comments: 0

    9:55AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Mon 05 May 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 05 05

    Last update: 05/05/03; 10:18:02 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • Burningbird: RDF Poetry Finder: Pieces of the Puzzle: This parallelism of data model between RDF and semantics is to be expected because the purpose behind RDF is to provide a model on which to build the semantic web. Unfortunately, though, somewhere along the way, we became fixated on RDF's serialization (transformation) to XML and lost sight of RDF's power to describe complex structures. -> If you want to start to understand what's this RDF thing is all about, read this beautiful essay by Shelley Powers.
    • Danny Ayers: Simple Semantics Resolution - RSS 2.0 Module Specification Version 1.0 (DRAFT): This specification defines the Simple Semantic Resolution (SSR) Module for the RSS 2.0 syndication format. The purpose of SSR is to provide a mechanism by which the semantics of an RSS 2.0 document can be unambiguously resolved to an RDF model. This is done by declaring the RSS 2.0 file as being an RDF representation and provide a mapping between the RSS 2.0 syntax and the RDF model. The mapping is declared using XSLT to give an RSS 1.0-based representation, this RDF/XML serialization providing anchorage to the RDF model. Put simply :an element is added to the source RSS 2.0 document which declares " this is RDF, and here is the mapping ". This has absolutely no effect on the interpretation of the document as RSS 2.0 within the bounds of that specification, but enables the contents of RSS 2.0 files to be considered first class material for the Semantic Web. This specification is intended to act as a bridge between RSS 2.0 and RSS 1.0 on a technical level, it is hoped readers of this document will consider the technical aspects above any political concerns.
    • Paul Prescod and Martin Streicher: Keeping the Web in Web Services : This philosophy or approach to building Web Services, or more generally, distributed applications, is called REST, an acronym for "Representational State Transfer." The REST approach -- REST is not a toolkit or an API or a specification -- argues that the lowly but irreplaceable universal resource identifier (or URI, commonly called "URL") is all the interface you'll ever need to expose a Web Service. (Linux Magazine)
    • Jeremy Zawodny: Revisiting FreeBSD vs. Linux for MySQL : Last September, I wrote entry that became quite popular. In FreeBSD or Linux for your MySQL Server? I detailed some of the reasons that led me to recommend Linux over FreeBSD for MySQL servers at Yahoo. You may hove also noticed my Solved: MySQL, FreeBSD, and LinuxThreads post back in October. Many people have e-mailed me recently to ask if the old posting is still accurate. A lot has changed since then and I'm writing this as a brief follow-up.
    • Jeremy Zawodny: Throttling Apache : mod_throttle allows you to build custom bandwidth and connection rate policies for individual files and directories and entire servers. (Linux Magazine)
    • Randal L. Schwartz: Finding Stuff : you can simply call the find command, or you can stare at the documentation for readdir() for a while and write your own recursive directory descent routine. But it's usually simpler to use the File::Find module, included with the core Perl distribution in many recent releases. (Linux Magazine)

    Politics

    • BBC News: Pakistan makes nuclear offer : The Pakistani Government says it would get rid of its nuclear arsenal if India were prepared to the same.
    • Simon Tisdall: What Europe has to do to avoid becoming a US vassal : Yet what is to be done about American power? The question will not go away. There seem to be three alternatives. In his now familiar role as explicator and facilitator of the American project, Tony Blair is emerging as prime advocate of the first. Unipolarity should not be feared, he says, but embraced. A "strategic partnership" between the US and Europe is the way forward. Any other approach would only encourage rival power bases and a new "cold war". (Guardian Unlimited)

    comments: 0

    12:01AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Sun 04 May 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 05 04

    Last update: 04/05/03; 12:50:14 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • Paul Johnson: JavaScript MD5 : The MD4, MD5 and SHA-1 algorithms are secure hash functions. They take a string input, and produce a fixed size number - 128 bits for MD4 and MD5; 160 bits for SHA-1. This number is a hash of the input - a small change in the input results in a substantial change in the output. The functions are thought to be secure, in the sense that it would require an enormous amount of computing power to find a string which hashes to a chosen value. In others words, there's no way to decrypt a secure hash. The uses of secure hashes include digital signatures and challenge hash authentication. [via PHP Complete]
    • Paul Johnson: CHAP Login : I originally wrote the [javascript] MD5 implementation to improve security on a login form for a website I was making, running on a web space account with no SSL capability. You can use a secure hash function to avoid sending the password as clear text; this makes it more secure than .htaccess access control. First the web server sends a random variable to the client. The client asks the user for the password, and makes the MD5 hash of the random variable and password, and sends this to the server. The server makes the MD5 hash of the random variable and its stored password. If the two hashes match, then the user knew the correct password, and the server allows access. At no point was the password transmitted in the clear. An eavesdropped won't be able to do a replay attack as the server will then expect a different random variable. -> Login system back-ends examples in Perl, PHP, ASP and Cold Fusion. [via PHP Complete]
    • Gene Spafford, Simson Garfinkel, Alan Schwartz: Tips on Writing Network Programs : If you are coding a new network service, there are a number of pitfalls you will need to consider. (O'Reilly Network)
    • Gene Spafford, Simson Garfinkel, Alan Schwartz: Tips on Writing SUID/SGID Programs : If you are writing programs that are SUID or SGID, you must take added precautions in your programming. (O'Reilly Network)
    • Mark Nottingham: RSS History Module: this module allows content providers to explicitly give the following information to aggregators and other RSS consumers;
      * how to determine which items in a feed have been seen before (i.e., dealing with "overlap")
      * how to determine which items should be considered "new" or "changed"
      * how to manage the overall history of the channel (what to do with old, new and changed items)
    • Rogers Cadenhead: Ask not whether Dave Winer created RSS: -> Fascinating thread in the comments on authorship of RSS with the usual suspects: Dave Winer, Ken MacLeod, Shelley Powers, Rogers Cadenhead and others. Flame ratio low.
    • Shelley Powers: Practical RDF : If you have concerns about the technology used, or are curious as to why I'm covering one tool over another, or suggestions about tools/apis/topics you feel I should have covered, please leave a comment.
    • Research Systems Unix Group (RSUG): radmind : A suite of Unix command-line tools and a server designed to remotely administer the file systems of multiple Unix machines. For Mac OS X, there's also a graphical interface. [via Macintouch]
    • Christopher Schmitt: 50+ Headings : Headings in Web pages--marked up with h1, h2, h3, h4, h5, or h6 elements--help the reader determine the purpose of sections in content. It also does one other thing: it helps the reader judge if the material is something they want to read. And if your heading is visually stimulating, the odds are better that the section will capture your reader's eye. So, with a dash of design, we can utilize CSS to stylize those Web page headings to catch the reader's eye and encourage them to read on. [via Jeffrey Zeldman Presents: The Daily Report]
    • Collin Ong: Using a Real "Virtual PC" : I plan to use the PC as an adjunct to my Power Mac, and to that end I paid an extra $59 to upgrade form Windows XP Home to XP Pro so that I could connect to the PC from the Mac using Microsoft's Remote Desktop Connection. RDC is a free download from Microsoft that runs Mac OS X native and allows you to connect to a Windows system, view its desktop in a Mac window, and control it using your Mac keyboard and mouse. You can even hear the PC's sound on your Mac. RDC requires XP Pro or one of the pro versions of NT and won't work on Win95/98/Me/XP Home. -> Its what I'm doing and its a really good working solution!

    Politics

    • alt.muslim : "Bridges" Creates A Safe Space For Muslims On TV : Last year Omar Amanat, a young American Muslim entrepreneur, had achieved a level of success rarely seen among Americans under 30. Having founded the online trading service Tradescape at the age of 24, he survived the dot-com fiasco to end up selling the company to E*Trade last year for a cool $280 million, making him E*Trade's largest individual shareholder. He could have plowed his time and money into his "next big thing", but Amanat had other plans. As a New Yorker with offices in the World Trade Center, Amanat saw firsthand the devastation of September 11th. But in the wake of 9/11 he was also tired of seeing constant headlines about Muslims that painted pictures that did not reflect the American Muslim community he knew so well, so Amanat and fellow entrepreneur Muzzammil Hassan dreamed up Bridges TV. Set to launch in the summer of 2004, Bridges is a cable and sattelite channel that aims to do for American Muslims what Al-Jazeera did for the Arab world - shake up the media landscape and provide a resonant community voice.

    comments: 0

    12:24PM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Sat 03 May 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 05 03

    Last update: 03/05/03; 17:54:38 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • Simon Willison: XmlWriter: Generating XML from PHP : Lars Marius Garshol's XMLWriter class for Python struck me as a particularly elegant solution for generating simple XML documents without having to worry about encoding issues, missing tags and so forth - so I re-implemented it in PHP
    • New York PHP: New York PHP Presentations : This is a running archive of presentations given to or by NYPHP. All content is free for non-profit use, and may be linked to or redistributed. -> Lots of good stuff here by Daniel Kushner, Adam Trachtenberg, David Sklar, Sterling Hughes, Zeev Suraski, etc.
    • R.A.D. Productions : ColorTagGen : ColorTagGen lets you use the MacOS color picker to pick a color. It displays the Red/Green/Blue (RGB) values and the HTML/CSS to be inserted into your web page. It allows you to pick from the 4 possible ways of specifying the color in the CSS Spec. It also allows you to enter RBG values, or HTML "#FFFFFF" format values and see the color. The HTML and/or UNIX name of the color is displayed if available, as well as whether the color is Web Safe or not. R.A.D Productions is also making the source available for the app. It is a very simple Cocoa application and viewing the simple source might be useful to the new Cocoa programmer. -> Hmm, the ColorTagGen logo could be "improved".
    • Brandon Fuller : Radio Userland and Photo Thumbnail Galleries : I thought that it would be cool to have a page that showed all the pictures that I have used in my blog postings.  The myPictures tool that comes with Radio Userland puts the pictures in a year/month/day directory structure so I wanted to work with that in a recursive nature.
    • Mac Developer Directory: Easily find contract developers with Mac or Mac related skills in this directory.
    • cafelog.com: b2 : weblog / news publishing tool -> PHP4 + MySQL

    Politics

    • Gideon Levy: 'Apartheid wall' : A light-green brochure issued by the Palestinian environmental organizations, "The Apartheid Wall Campaign," reveals the statistics: 2 percent of the lands of the West Bank will be expropriated during the first stage, at least 30 villages will lose part of their lands, 15 villages will be caged in between the fence and the Green Line, 160,000-180,000 dunams [40,000 to 45,000 acres] will be expropriated, 30 wells will be cut off from their owners. And this only in the first stage, only in the northern part of the West Bank. (Haaretz)

    comments: 0

    2:47PM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Fri 02 May 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 05 02

    Last update: 02/05/03; 16:44:19 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • Rogers Cadenhead: Ask not whether Dave Winer created RSS: There has been some disagreement lately over Dave Winer's claim to have co-created RSS with Netscape. I did some research on this for an RSS chapter in Radio UserLand Kick Start , and I think Winer's on solid ground.
    • Ken MacLeod : RSS History
    • Wrox: Programmer-to-Programmer. That's the cornerstone of the WROX philosophy. Now that WROX is part of the Wiley family, we have every intention of preserving this core value for future publications. -> Good to hear that Wrox will continue to publish and maintains its catalog.
    • Robert C. Martin : Are Dynamic Languages Going to Replace Static Languages?: About two years ago I noticed something. I was depending less and less on the type system for safety. My unit tests were preventing me from making type errors. The more I depended upon the unit tests, the less I depended upon the type safety of Java or C++ (my languages of choice). I thought an experiment was in order. So I tried writing some applications in Python, and then Ruby (well known dynamically typed languages). I was not entirely surprised when I found that type issues simply never arose. My unit tests kept my code on the straight and narrow. I simply didn't need the static type checking that I had depended upon for so many years. I also realized that the flexibility of dynamically typed langauges makes writing code significantly easier. Modules are easier to write, and easier to change. There are no build time issues at all. Life in a dynamically typed world is fundamentally simpler. [via Roland Tanglao]
    • Simon St. Laurent : The (data) medium is the message : I don't think I invented it, but I've long described a difference between 'square' and 'groovy' data. 'Square' data is easily atomized and tabulated, a perfect fit for relational models. 'Groovy' data is information that doesn't neatly fit in a box, typically information created by and for human users directly. XML fits that kind of data very well, with its tolerance for arbitrarily recursive structures, reuse of content through inclusion, and structures flexible enough to mix raw text nodes with containers. RDF feels like 'puzzle' data to me, interlocking pieces which form larger pictures when assembled. Object stores are kind of a combination of all three of these, with the strong demands for structure common to relational work, the hierarchy of XML (though with multiple and different kinds of hierarchy), and a massive dose of RDF's interconnectedness. I don't quite know what to call that, as it both subsets and supersets the other categories. I think it's time for developers to take a closer look at how they're storing data, and what that means for the data and for other developers. We seem to have moved into an age where modeling information too tightly against a particular set of processing expectations incurs significant costs, and it's time to start thinking about what media fits our information best rather than what we want to do with the information today. (O'Reilly Developer Weblogs)
    • Burningbird: RSS - The Sledge-o-Matic of Markup : How many people have ported their pages from one weblogging tool to another? The key is an import mechanism, not a format.
    • Chris Cochella : Personal Security on Jaguar: The Secure Shell, Part 1: The purpose of focusing on SSH is that it can be instantly used in Jaguar to secure two of the most common daily work processes: file transfers (FTP) and email. As a web applications developer, I often connect to remote servers to upload files or make changes to sites. Wrapped around this process is a constant buzz of email communication. In the case of email and FTP we want to protect our passwords as well as the information or content that we send. SSH can do both and it costs nothing. (O'Reilly Mac DevCenter)
    • Rogers Cadenhead: Radio UserLand Kick Start : Now that the book has been announced by the publisher, I can finally start talking about what I've been working on lately: Radio UserLand Kick Start will be published this summer by Sams Publishing.-> First beta chapter.
    • Ranchero Software: NetNewsWire 1.0.2b1. -> New beta version of NetNewsWire. Change Notes
    • Bill Kearney: XFML.root: Exports from your Radio posts to an XFML file. -> XFML stand for eXchangeable Faceted Metadata Language. Check zboïng! for a coming explanation (keeping the pressure on).
    • Bill Kearney: RDF.root : This is a tool for Radio UserLand. Using it will allow your Radio8 install to produce RSS-1.0 XML feeds.
    • Bill Kearney: Exporter.root: Exports from your Radio posts to MovableType
    • chxo.com: Email Address to Image Converter: The form below will create a PNG image file from your email address that can be safely placed on your website. The form will not save your email address anywhere on our system.

    Politics

    • Alan Riding: Loss Estimates Are Cut on Iraqi Artifacts, but Questions Remain : Even if the damage may not be as widespread as originally reported, there is still no clear answer to the most important question: just how much has been taken? (New-York Times)
    • Juliet Eilperin and Amy Goldstein: House Passes $15 Billion AIDS Bill : House Majority Leader Tom DeLay (R-Tex.) described yesterday's bill as "a moral crusade," saying that abstinence "works, and we can't let the fog of politics obscure that fact." -> Its sad to see a country like the US going down like this. I wonder in what world the neocons are living. I worry that beside all, Bush will be reelected. (Washington Post)

    comments: 0

    10:43AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Wed 30 Apr 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 04 30

    Last update: 30/04/03; 15:01:25 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • John Robb : Question: If any Mac developer(s) want(s) to work with UserLand to build a slick interface for Radio (like this one for Windows ), let me know. -> I always though that AppleScript Studio could be a perfect fit to build such an interface. I wanted to do something like this a while ago, but I'm no AppleScript Studio Guru. A "pure" Cocoa app could be nice too. I see Philippe "Flip" Martin in a good position to do such a task (Brent Simmons is a good contender too, but he is just too busy I guess with NetNewsWire). What could be nice, is to implement a "bridge" library that allow to hook the app to Radio. Now, should it be based on AppleEvents or XML-RPC? The advantage of AppleEvents is that its faster on the Mac, but Radio have some issues related to the string format that AppleEvents sometimes use which is, I think, UTF-8. The Apple XML-RPC implementation have also some issues and Brent Simmons implemented its own library for NetNewsWire (which is I think, Brent released as a BSD license). The advantage of implementing an XML-RPC library to hook interfaces to Radio is that you can use it on any platforms.
    • MySQL: MySQL 4.1.0 has been released :
      * Subqueries:
      SELECT * FROM t1 WHERE t1.a=(SELECT t2.b FROM t2);
      SELECT * FROM t1 WHERE (1,2,3) IN (SELECT a,b,c FROM t2);
      -> At last!
    • James Cox: Mechanics of Replication [PDF]: In really simple terms, MySQL replication works by each slave keeping track of the status of its master server. So when there is an update to the master server, be it a delete, an update, an insert or some other query that changes the data, the query is logged. Each slave then pings the master server, asking for new updates since a certain time and date - I.e., the last update. Once the master server has told the slave all about what happened since the last update, the slave then performs all the queries that it just downloaded from the master. At this point the slave ends its work on the master and carries on it's own business till the next update. [via Sterling Hughes]
    • Andrew Orlowski: Linus Torvalds blesses DRM, and nothing happens : Last week Linus Torvalds said share denial technology, or DRM (Digital Rights Management) is OK. He did so on a linux kernel mailing list and so anticipating the reaction, with the Subject line: Flame Linus to a crisp! [via Hack the Planet]
    • use Perl: Bricolage 1.6.0 Busts Loose : The Bricolage team is pleased to announce the release of Bricolage 1.6.0. This is the first new stable release of Bricolage since the release of version 1.4.6 in January, and the first major release since 1.4.0 in September, 2002.

    Politics

    • Ashleigh Banfield: MSNBC's Banfield Slams War Coverage : Who thinks that Hezbollah is a bad word? Show of hands. Usually connotes fear, terror, some kind of suicide bombing. If you live in the Arab world, Hezbollah means Shriner. Hezbollah means charity, Hezbollah means hospitals, Hezbollah means welfare and jobs. -> A must read! [via Scripting News]

    comments: 0

    9:00AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Tue 29 Apr 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 04 29

    Last update: 29/04/03; 12:14:27 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • Thomas N. Burg: Radio Links
    • WhatIsMyIP.com: WhatIsMyIP.com is the easiest way to determine your IP address.
    • Tim Bray: On Apple's Music Store: It's about time someone kicked the music biz upside the head and got them to start acting sensible. Long past time, in fact. Glad to see it happen.
    • Eugenia Loli-Queru : Focus on FreeBSD: Interview with the Core Team : Today we feature an in-depth interview with three members of FreeBSD 's Core (Wes Peters, Greg Lehey and M. Warner Losh) and also a major FreeBSD developer (Scott Long). It is a long read, but we touch a number of hot issues, from the Java port to corporate backing, the Linux competition, the 5.x branch and how it stacks up against the other Unices, UFS2, the possible XFree86 fork, SCO and its Unix IP situation, even re-unification of the BSDs. [via Slashdot]
    • Giles Turnbull: Freeware Gems for Mac OS X : We're talking about neat little apps that you might not have heard of, but that can do the job of something much better-known (and much more expensive) without you having to pay a penny for them. [via O'Reilly Mac DevCenter]
    • Andrew M. Duncan: Objective-C: Dynamite! : What's so bad about sending a message that is not understood? If a person on the street asks you for a flump, and you don't know how to respond, do you exit with a core dump? [via O'Reilly Mac DevCenter]

    Politics

    • Ilene R. Prusher: Free media blossom in Iraq city : In the two weeks since Kirkuk fell to a mix of Kurdish and US forces, free media outlets have been busting out all over: An Internet cafe opened its doors; a radio station called the Voice of Kirkuk started broadcasting part time; a newspaper called New Kurdistan, published in the autonomous northern city of Sulaymaniyah, started circulating here; and people are tuning into several Kurdish television channels broadcasting from the self-rule zone, an offense which in the past could have landed a person in jail, at best. (csmonitor.com)
    • Edward W. Said: What Is Happening To The United States? : Americans have been cheated, Iraqis have suffered impossibly, and Bush looks like the moral equivalent of a cowboy sheriff who has just led his righteous posse to a victorious showdown against an evil enemy. On matters of the gravest importance to millions of people constitutional principles have been violated and the electorate lied to unconscionably. We are the ones who must have our democracy back. Enough of smoke and mirrors and smooth talking hustlers. (english.daralhayat.com)

    comments: 0

    12:21AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Mon 28 Apr 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 04 28

    Last update: 28/04/03; 19:43:46 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • Walter W. Woolfolk and Bruce Johnson: Information-Free Identifiers: A Key to Flexible Information Systems Part 1: Identifiers are artifacts of serious convenience. The ability and inclination to name things is so convenient that it is probably wired into the human brain. 1Identifiers are, roughly speaking, the names given to things, and naming conventions are the rules devised to assign names to things. Modifications to identifiers take many forms that may be disruptive and costly to the systems within which the identifiers reside. There are two basic types of information structure modification that might be performed on a system: (1) moving a property from one thing to another and (2) altering the properties of a thing's identifier. This article examines in detail the causes and consequences of the second type and then discusses the implementation of identifiers that are immune to modification. -> Part 2 [via Roland Tanglao]
    • Chris Nandor : Applescript from Perl (OSX)? : For a quick overview: you create "glues" for scriptable apps (in MacPerl with a droplet, in Mac OS X with a command-line script):
      % gluemac /Applications/iTunes.app
      That generates the glue, which contains mappings for AppleScript vocabulary to the underlying Apple events, and POD describing the classes, events, etc. for that application (you also need to run similar scripts to create glues for the main AppleScript "dialect" and any scripting additions you are using). Then you create an object and start using it.
      my $itunes = new Mac::Glue 'iTunes';
      $itunes->play;
      And it Just Works. No AppleScript involved, though the same vocabulary is used. No figuring out the event ID/suite ID/app signature. Mac::Glue does all the work.
    • somebodydial911.com: PHP Command Line Interface (CLI) Binary for OS X : This is the initial release of PHP's command line interface (CLI) in binary form for OS X. I've included the following libraries in this release: curl, mhash, mysql, ncurses, pcre, posix, readline, sockets, tokenizer, xml and xmlrpc.
    • PHP.net: My PHP.net : This page allows you to customize the PHP.net site to some degree to your own liking. Currently you can only set the language you prefer, thus overriding any other automatic language selection.
    • Fiatlux: About Fiatlux : Fiatlux is a web application that creates and administers private HTTP file-sharing areas, similar to FTP but easier for non-technical people to use. With Fiatlux, an organization can easily maintain a large number of separate, password-protected file repositories, complete with comments and sequential version control.
    • Nisus Software: Nisus Writer Express: Three way scripting using Express's own Menu Command Macros, and industry standard AppleScript and Perl to customise this beauty to work exactly the way you want so it helps you write -- not hinders. You can start with the simplest point-click-and-record macros, then if you want to go further, use free, shareware or commercial scripts, or write your own, in either AppleScript or Perl.
    • Gene Steinberg: At Last: Introducing Nisus Writer Express : Taking advantage of some of the cooler capabilities of a Cocoa application, Express uses a tooldrawer, a slide out window, to display formatting tools. A really clever touch is the use of a slider to change formatting, such as type size and line spacing. And, at last, there's a real, live zoom tool, a very basic feature absent from previous versions of Nisus.
    • Josh Aas: LineBreak : This is a simple utility for Mac OS X that converts line breaks in text documents. It can convert to Mac, UNIX®, and DOS formats. It is written entirely in Cocoa and supports drag and drop in the finder.
    • Andrew Trevorrow: m2u - converts CRs to LFs in a given file (ie. Mac to Unix) / u2m - converts LFs to CRs in a given file (ie. Unix to Mac) [FTP download] -> for the command-line, preserve type, creator, resource forks
    • BlogComp: Blog Tool Feature Comparison - *new & improved*
    • clankwerks.com: bbedit applescripts
    • Chip Chapin : PHP Dynamic Menu Tools : This page is my survey of several PHP tools for dynamically generating menus. [via PHP Complete]

    Politics

    • alt.muslim:Introducing alt.muslim: We've designed this website to be an interactive web community dedicated to topical discussion and intellectual exploration for issues regarding the Muslim community. Modeled after group weblogs such as Plastic and Metafilter , this site has an open-source compilation of issues affecting the Muslim world, commentary and discussion on a variety of topics, and above all, a community of people who want to become more informed and involved in the world around them.

    comments: 0

    6:27PM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Mon 21 Apr 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 04 21

    Last update: 21/04/03; 10:57:48 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • Sifry's Alerts: Easy News Topics : Last week, Paolo Valdermarin and Matt Mower released their specification of Easy News Topics 1.0 (ENT), which is designed as an RSS 2.0 module that can add topic and categorization information to an RSS feed.  I committed to get back to them ( and others ) with a review and some commentary on the approach.
    • Randal Schwartz: PERL OF WISDOM: The One Thing Perl Got Right: The one thing that Eric claims that Perl got right is just one of the many things that I think Perl got right: Perl makes it easy to access low-level operating system functionality. (Linux Magazine)
    • David Wheeler: Content Management with Bricolage: Bricolage [is] a robust, actively developed open-source CMS built to centrally support a distributed organization of content and formatting specialists via an intuitive, browser-based interface. By rigidly separating content from formatting, Bricolage allows nontechnical users to quickly update and publish content relevant to them without having to coordinate with the production folks for formatting in HTML or with IT for getting the content on the site.
    • Glen Gillmore: Stay on Top of the Latest Technology with News Feeds from O'Reilly: If you would like to stay on top of all the new books, articles, stories, and weblogs from O'Reilly, we offer a variety of RSS feeds you can use. The list below covers our main feeds. (O'Reilly Network)
    • Danny Goodman: JavaScript & DHTML Cookbook: Page Navigation Techniques (O'Reilly)
    • Internet Developer: Dynamic Content with DOM-2 (Part I of II): The Document Object Model Level 2 (DOM-2), supported in both Mac IE5 and NS6, provides an interface that enables developers to generate HTML on the fly, after the page has loaded. We accomplish this by calling DOM-2 methods to create HTML elements, defining the elements' attributes, and appending them to the document body or existing elements. This article explores some of the basic functionality of DOM-2 for generating dynamic content in the browser.
    • Luis Argerich: Introduction to PHP5: In this article I will focus in three major new features of PHP5: the new object model, exceptions, namespaces. (PHPBuilder)
    • Jason Deraleau: Mac OS X Unix Package Management: I've been a long time Fink user, but after reading a bit about DarwinPorts I decided to give it a try. (...) Below are descriptions of using the two different tools for the most common tasks: Installation of the tool, package installation, package removal, package upgrading, and searching for packages. (O'Reilly Developer Weblogs)
    • Mark Woods: A Busy Writers Guide to Radio Renderers: This document provides a quick introduction to writing stories using HTML renderers in Radio 8.0. Renderers provide a simple mechanism for formatting text within specific HTML constructs (e.g. a table) without specifying the actual HTML tags.
    • David Carter-Tod: Tidy Tool: This tool shows how to use Tidy from Frontier. Right now it's very limited - basically a single script: tidySuite.clean(somehtml, fragment) which returns the cleaned HTML. fragment is a boolean which indicates whether it's partial HTML or a complete file.
    • Purl: A PURL is a Persistent Uniform Resource Locator. Functionally, a PURL is a URL. However, instead of pointing directly to the location of an Internet resource, a PURL points to an intermediate resolution service. The PURL resolution service associates the PURL with the actual URL and returns that URL to the client. The client can then complete the URL transaction in the normal fashion. In Web parlance, this is a standard HTTP redirect.

    Politics

    • Tim Bray: Sweet Memories Die: I find that passage almost physically painful to read, and I ponder my own shudders at the news from Iraq this week, and looking into my heart I realize that my reaction to museum/library news from Baghdad was not dramatically less than to the news you can read about over at the Iraq Body Count site. Am I a monster? Has my geekiness outrun my humanity?
    • BBC News: Reporters' log: Final thoughts: In this last instalment of the reporters' log they record some final impressions and look back at what it was like reporting the war.
    • David Teather in New York and Ian Traynor: US 'to keep bases in Iraq': The US is planning a long-term military presence in Iraq, in a move which will dramatically extend American power in the region and spread dismay and fear among its opponents across the Arab world. (Guardian Unlimited)

    comments: 0

    10:53AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Thu 17 Apr 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 04 17

    Last update: 17/04/03; 10:06:36 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • The Wilderness Society - CMS Evaluation Project: Content Management Systems on Debian GNU/Linux : A number of Content Management Systems (CMS) were setup and evaluated using Debian GNU/Linux as the platform. The CMSs were all open source with a focus on those that were written in PHP, but also included 2 written in perl, OpenACS written in Tcl and Plone which is built on CMF, a Zope based web application framework. Zope is written in python.
    • FTPress: MAILMAN VS SYMPA: There are numerous mailing list managers, and choosing between them is no easy task. Our firm, FTPress, has carried out a comparative study of two well-known Open Source servers (GPL license) : Mailman (version 2.0.9), the GNU list manager, and Sympa (version 3.3.3), a system developed at the beginning for French Universities.
    • Sympa: What's sympa?: Sympa is a mailing-list manager. As such, its goal is to automate all mailing-list operation such as subscription with automatic authentication, unsubscription, but also archiving message, sending digests on a regular basis, expiration of addresses, and so on.
    • Jon Udell: The Semantic Blog: the real message here is that you can concisely extract an analytical result from the chaotic stew of RSS flavors. A couple of XPath queries suffice to characterize the two dominant flavors of RSS that are relevant to the distribution of versions in a sample of feeds. It is remarkably powerful to be able to join those XPath queries in the context of a SQL query, and then further manipulate the results in SQL.
    • java.blogs: Welcome to the java.blogs community!
    • Eugenia Loli-Queru: Interview with Jordan Hubbard of Apple and OpenDarwin: While not taking anything away from fink, a highly successful project which has greatly benefited Mac OS X's Unix-savvy user base for some time now, we think there is still a lot of room for innovation concerning how to construct and maintain a port collection's infrastructure. That is the goal of DarwinPorts in a nutshell: To create an open-ended, 2nd generation architecture which benefits from a lot of the knowledge already gained through experience with systems like FreeBSD ports and fink. (OS news)
    • OpenDarwin: Projects :: DarwinPorts: The DarwinPorts project aims to provide a large amount of software ports that make it easy to install freely available software on a Darwin system.

    comments: 0

    10:05AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Wed 16 Apr 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 04 16

    Last update: 16/04/03; 11:01:48 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • Macintouch: We have been experimenting with providing a requested MacInTouch RSS feed , and we hope to continue it as long as there are no major performance problems (e.g. server overload from masses of people hitting the website simultaneously). You can paste the URL: http://www.macintouch.com/rss.xml into NetNewsWire or an equivalent application.
    • Red Sweater Software: FastScripts is a utility for quickly and elegantly running scripts (AppleScript or shell scripts) from whichever application you happen to be running at the moment. In most respects, it can be considered a replacement for the Apple-provided "Script Menu" menu extra. In addition to the functionality provided by Apple's Script Menu utility, FastScripts offers a number of compelling improvements. [via Macintouch]
    • Ben Hammersley: Chapter 2: Content-Syndication Architecture: In this chapter, we'll look at how RSS feeds are structured: both the feed itself and the way RSS fits into the whole web publishing picture. First, let's look at the structure of publishing on the Web. (WebReference.com)
    • Adam Trickett: XML::RSS::Tools - Perl extension for very high level RSS feed manipulation: RSS/RDF feeds are commonly available ways of distributing the latest news about a given web site for news syndication. This module provides a VERY high level way of manipulating them. You can easily use LWP, the XML::RSS and XML::LibXSLT do to this yourself. [via Ben Hammersley] (CPAN: Comprehensive Perl Archive Network )
    • Blogads: The ad engine for opinion makers. [via Ben Hammersley]
    • markpasc.org: Radio Discussion Group FAQ
    • Gary Kerbaugh : The Born Again Remove Function: This script emulates the GNU rm function, except that it moves files to the user's Trash directory, instead of unlinking them. Spaces may be used in file names if the arguments are quoted and you can use file name globbing. File name globbing means using wildcards, "*", to represent the uncommon characters in a group of file names sharing a unique intersection of characters. [via raelity bytes]

    Politics

    • Robert Fisk: Library books, letters and priceless documents are set ablaze in final chapter of the sacking of Baghdad: for Iraq, this is Year Zero; with the destruction of the antiquities in the Museum of Archaeology on Saturday and the burning of the National Archives and then the Koranic library, the cultural identity of Iraq is being erased. Why? Who set these fires? For what insane purpose is this heritage being destroyed? [via Doc Searls] (The Independent)
    • Don: The American Forces are doing the right thing. There are more than enough other museums in the world to visit.
    • Michael Binyon: Hunt for the raiders of the lost art: Many will see this not as a lapse or the inevitable result of wartime chaos but as a deliberate attempt to humiliate and demoralise Iraq. (...) Ironically, Saddam's regime was one of the best at protecting Iraq's heritage. Money was spent on excavations, grave robbers were summarily executed and the ancient treasures of the many peoples of Mesopotamia were adduced as evidence of Iraq's glorious history. It may have been megalomania that prompted Saddam, like Hitler, to mythologise the past and compare himself with Nebuchadnezzar, but it certainly protected sites that foreign archaeologists insist belong to all mankind. (TIMES ONLINE)

    comments: 0

    10:55AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Tue 15 Apr 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 04 15

    Last update: 16/04/03; 10:55:02 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • serendipity - A PHP Weblog-System: Featuring an (optional) WSYISWG editor, image manager (...) Support for both the MovableType and Blogger XML-RPC APIs. (...) Caching is dynamically managed (...) Trackback and Pingback. (...) A robust plugin system allows you to modify Serendipity without digging through the source code. (...) Serendipity supports MySQL, PostgreSQL and SQLlite database backends. (...) Multiple users can edit and administrate the weblog. Internationalized. (...) Serendipity is licensed under the BSD License. (...) Serendipity fully support for XHTML 1.0, CSS 2.0, RSS 0.93, 1.0, and 2.0
    • opensourceCMS.com: This site was created with one goal in mind. To give you the opportunity to "try out" some of the best php/mysql based free and open source software systems in the world. You are welcome to be the administrator of any site here, allowing you to decide which system best suits your needs.
    • Research Systems Unix Group: Fugu - A Mac OS X SFTP, SCP and SSH Frontend. : Fugu is a graphical frontend to the commandline Secure File Transfer application ( SFTP ). SFTP is similar to FTP, but unlike FTP, the entire session is encrypted, meaning no passwords are sent in cleartext form, and is thus much less vulnerable to third-party interception. Fugu allows you to take advantage of SFTP's security without having to sacrifice the ease of use found in a GUI. Fugu also includes support for SCP file transfers, and the ability to create secure tunnels vi SSH. -> Freeware, BSD-style license.

    Politics

    • BBC News: Prized Iraqi annals 'lost in blaze': A Western journalist - Robert Fisk of the Independent - reporting from the site of the library told the BBC that the whole building had been gutted, with handwritten documents from as far back as the 16th century - when Iraq was part of the Ottoman Empire - strewn on the ground. A nearby Islamic library has also gone in up in flames, he said, destroying valuable literature including one of the oldest surviving copies of the Koran.
    • Oliver Burkeman: Ancient archive lost in Baghdad library blaze: As flames engulfed Baghdad's National Library yesterday, destroying manuscripts many centuries old, the Pentagon admitted that it had been caught unprepared by the widespread looting of antiquities, despite months of warnings from American archaeologists. (...) A Pentagon official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said no plans had been made to protect antiquities from looters, as opposed to ensuring that historical sites were not caught up in the fighting itself. (Guardian Unlimited)

    comments: 0

    11:24AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Mon 14 Apr 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 04 14

    Last update: 16/04/03; 10:54:57 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • FreeBSD.org: freebsd-performance -- Performance/tuning: The performance@ mailing list exists to provide a place for hackers, administrators, and/or concerned parties to discuss performance related topics pertaining to FreeBSD. Acceptable topics includes talking about FreeBSD installations that are either under high load, are experiencing performance problems, or are pushing the limits of FreeBSD. Concerned parties that are willing to work toward improving the performance of FreeBSD are highly encouraged to subscribe to this list. This is a highly technical list ideally suited for experienced FreeBSD users, hackers, or administrators interested in keeping FreeBSD fast, robust, and scalable.
    • Philippe Martin: IC-Switch 1.2 has been released: The changes include the addition of a FTP submenu, an improvement to the News submenu (that now controls the 'news' protocol in addition to 'nntp'), a new preference allowing you to choose the icon to use in the menubar, a rework of the preferences window, and the fix of a potential crash when adding some buggy applications to a submenu.

    Politics

    • Jonathan Steele: Museum's treasures left to the mercy of looters : US army commanders have rejected a new plea by desperate officials of the Iraq Museum to protect the country's archeological treasures from looters. Despite worldwide media coverage at the weekend of the waves of vandalism and plunder last week, no tanks or troops were visible there yesterday. (Guardian Unlimited)
    • Andrew Gumbel, David Keys: US blamed for failure to stop sacking of museum: Archaeologists, poets, cultural historians and international legal experts, including many in America itself, accused Washington of violating the 1954 Hague Convention on the protection of artistic treasures in wartime. (...) Dr Eleanor Robson, a member of the council of the British School of Archaeology in Iraq, said: "The looting of the Iraq Museum is on a par with blowing up Stonehenge or ransacking the Bodleian Library. For world culture, it is a global catastrophe." (The Independent)
    • Mary Wiltenburg and Philip Smucker: Looters plunder in minutes Iraq's millennia-old legacy : A group of scholars, conservators, and collectors, including MacGuire Gibson of the University of Chicago, the leading US researcher in Mesopotamian archaeology, drew up a list for the Pentagon of more than 4,000 crucial Iraqi museums, monuments, and archaeological digs, urging commanders to spare them. "The museum was at the top of that list," Dr. Gibson says. (...) Dr. Gibson learned of the looting on Friday, when the mob had only sacked the museum's first floor, and not yet its vaults. "That's as if somebody had gotten into the Metropolitan [Museum in New York] and taken everything out of half of it," he said, his voice shaking. (csmonitor.com)
    • Robert Fisk: US guards only oil and intelligence as looters ransack government buildings: US troops have sat back and allowed mobs to wreck and then burn the Ministry of Planning, the Ministry of Education, the Ministry of Irrigation, the Ministry of Trade, the Ministry of Industry, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Ministry of Culture and the Ministry of Information. They did nothing to prevent looters from destroying priceless treasures of Iraq's history in the Baghdad Archaeological Museum and in the Museum in the northern city of Mosul, nor from looting three hospitals. However, the Americans have put hundreds of troops inside two Iraqi ministries, which remain untouched - and untouchable - because tanks and armoured personnel carriers and Humvee jeeps have been placed inside and outside both institutions. (New Zealand Herald)
    • New-York Times Editorial: The Iraq Money Tree: Even if a legal basis can be found for these closed bidding arrangements, they are unacceptable. The Iraq war was fought in the name of high principles. Victory should not turn into an undeserved financial bonanza for companies that have cultivated close ties with the Bush administration.

    comments: 0

    10:25AM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Tue 08 Apr 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 04 08

    Last update: 16/04/03; 10:54:53 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • Roger Costello, David Jacobs: A Quick Introduction to OWL Web Ontology Language [via zboïng!]
    • Michael K. Smith, Chris Welty, Deborah McGuinness: Web Ontology Language (OWL) Guide Version 1.0: The World Wide Web as it is currently constituted resembles a poorly mapped geography. Our insight into the documents and capabilities available are based on keyword searches, abetted by clever use of document connectivity and usage patterns. The sheer mass of this data is unmanageable without powerful tool support. In order to map this terrain more precisely, computational agents require machine-readable descriptions of the content and capabilities of web accessible resources. These descriptions must be in addition to the human-readable versions of that information. The Web Ontology Language (OWL) is intended to provide a language that can be used to describe the classes and relations between them that are inherent in Web documents and applications. [via zboïng!] (W3C)
    • David Mattison: Quickiwiki, Swiki, Twiki, Zwiki and the Plone Wars. Wiki as a PIM and Collaborative Content Tool.: Wikis are everywhere, but, unfortunately, the online literature has not begun to focus on wikis yet. Why aren't wikis on our radar screen the way blogs are right now? [via A Frog in the Valley] (Information Today)
    • Philip Greenspun: Weblogging and Dave Winer: [As for Dave the Man he's a nice guy personally but like a lot of folks who've made big contributions he is very focussed on a few themes. The themes that I've seen him focussed on are outliners, object databases, and his blogging software. Kind of refreshing in a world that watches CNN obsessively :-) ]
    • Danny Sullivan: RSS: Your Gateway To News & Blog Content: In this article, we look more about how content from blogs, news sites and other sources is distributed via RSS feeds. These feeds can be a great way for anyone to receive customized news information from growing number of sources. (Search Engine Watch)
    • FreeFilter: Open Source MetaFilteresque Community Software: FreeFilter is an open source attempt at replicating the basic 'feel' of the MetaFilter.com system developed by Matt Haughey for use as a community system on sites separate from the MetaFilter universe. FreeFilter can be used in a MetaFilter style arrangement, or by using the abilities to turn posts on and off, you can use it to develop a weblog. Initially I will be primarily using it for the latter purpose. FreeFilter has, so far, been developed by Peter Cooper (...)-> Based on Perl. [via Roland Tanglao]
    • ESW Wiki: While W3C has a formal recommendation track for creating standard specifications which fully answer questions within their scope, many frequently asked questions fall outside the scope of the specifications themselves. This Semantic Web Collaboratory is for connecting the folks that make the specs with the folks that build on them. [via Karl Dubost]
    • Jason E. Sweat: Advanced Features in JpGraph: JpGraph is the premier PHP-based data graphing interface for creating pretty pie charts and bar graphs. Once you've gotten a grip on that, let Jason show you how to interface JpGraph with complex, real-world data sets to create truly professional, enterprise-strength graphs that really tell a compelling story about your business. ("PHP|Architect")

    Politics

    • Vernon Loeb and Jonathan Weisman: U.S. Losses Light as Iraqi Toll Surges in Baghdad Fighting : The WHO's (World Health Organization) concern about the emotional well-being of Iraqi children stems from the fact that Iraqi military service is compulsory, with about 274,000 men conscripted annually, according to Anthony Cordesman, a defense analyst at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Many of those conscripts were cannon fodder during the 1991 Persian Gulf War, when an estimated 10,000 to 15,000 Iraqi soldiers were killed, said William Arkin, an independent defense analyst who developed some of the most authoritative casualty estimates of that campaign. "If your point here is to minimize civilian harm, you can't slaughter military people and think that you've evaded that issue," Arkin said. "They all have families. If we leave thousands or tens of thousands of families without young men, we're going to pay a price in the postwar period." Simpson, the WHO spokesman, echoed his concern. "It's very easy for the coalition to say we've only hit military targets, but you're still killing people, and people have families. If the aim of your military campaign is to win over the hearts and minds of the people, then killing large numbers of conscripts is not going to help." (Washington Post)
    • Anthony Shadid: Hospitals Overwhelmed By Living and the Dead: Like others, Obeid, 22, seemed confused. Articulate and well-informed, he insisted that U.S. and British forces had made clear in Arabic-language broadcasts on the BBC that civilians would not be harmed. He didn't understand what was happening. "That was the promise they gave the Iraqis," he said. "They always said, 'We have nothing against the civilians.' " He was hurt, disoriented and angry. "We didn't do anything to them," Obeid said. "I was sure 100 percent they would not shoot at a civilian. Now I'm 100 percent sure they will." (Washington Post)
    • Anwar Iqbal: Kashmir is not Iraq, says U.S.: Indian Foreign Minister Yashwant Sinha said last week that India has a right of pre-emptive strike against Pakistan and that the United States has already set an example for such an attack by invading Iraq. (United Press International)

    comments: 0

    12:50PM EDT [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Fri 04 Apr 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 04 04

    Last update: 04/04/03; 10:30:50 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • datetime.perl.org: The goal of the DateTime Project is to produce a suite of inter-operable modules for dealing with dates and times. -> Lots of interesting modules listed here; DateTime::Format::MySQL, DateTime::Format::ICal, etc. [via Perl.com]
    • Nicholas Chase: SAX-like apps in PHP. Use streaming XML data in PHP.: PHP does compensate for having no official implementation of the Simple API for XML, or SAX, by providing a SAX-like method for working with both local and remote XML files. This article demonstrates how to work with XML files in PHP by building and setting handler functions and creating a parser. (IBM DeveloperWorks)
    • Danny Sullivan: Making An RSS Feed: What does RSS stand for? There's a can of worms. RSS as introduced by Netscape in 1999 then later abandoned in 2001 stood for "Rich Site Summary." Another version of RSS pioneered by UserLand Software stands for "Really Simple Syndication." In yet another version, RSS stands for "RDF Site Summary." (Search Engine Watch)
    • Stas Bekma: Apache::VMonitor: The Apache::VMonitor module provides even better monitoring functionality than top(1). It gives all the relevant information top(1) does, plus all the Apache specific information provided by Apache's mod_status module, such as request processing time, last request's URI, number of requests served by each child, etc. In addition, it emulates the reporting functions of the top(1), mount(1), df(1) utilities. There is a special mode for mod_perl processes. It has visual alerting capabilities and a configurable automatic refresh mode. It provides a Web interface, which can be used to show or hide all sections dynamically. [via Perl.com]

    Politics

    • New-York Times Graphic: The Arab Press
    • Rami G. Khouri: The War Americans Don't See: More common, though, are images of dead and maimed Iraqi children, parents wailing over the coffins of relatives killed by American bombings, extensive damage of Iraqi civilian buildings and Iraqi civilians being humiliated by American and British troops. Sometimes, an image that would get an innocuous description in an American newspaper is given a more sinister interpretation in the Arab press. (New-York Times)
    • Gideon Same: The Israelization of America: Thus, one way to look at the Israelization of America is from the perspective of Henry Kissinger's famous remark that Israel has no foreign policy, only a domestic policy. As is the case here, internal politics in the United States often overrides foreign policy. Apart from this common feature of governments, the highest levels in America are rife with a cogent conservatism that can abet the prime minister's efforts to undermine the initiative for a settlement with the Palestinians. Those who sent America into war with Iraq - officials such as Donald Rumsfeld, for example - have always snorted contemptuously at Palestinian national aspirations (in what the defense secretary likes to call the "so-called occupied territories"). So there is an internal contradiction, whose overall results are still hard to gauge, between the administration's aim to impose a new order in the region, and the ideology of powerful figures in it who have no love for the Palestinian cause. (Haaretz)
    • Ari Shavi: White man's burden: And from America's point of view, Saddam's Iraq is Jenin. This war is a defensive shield. It follows that the danger is the same: that like Israel, America will make the mistake of using only force. (...) Is the Iraq war the great neoconservative war? It's the war the neoconservatives wanted, Friedman says. It's the war the neoconservatives marketed. Those people had an idea to sell when September 11 came, and they sold it. Oh boy, did they sell it. So this is not a war that the masses demanded. This is a war of an elite. Friedman laughs: I could give you the names of 25 people (all of whom are at this moment within a five-block radius of this office) who, if you had exiled them to a desert island a year and a half ago, the Iraq war would not have happened. (...) Still, it's not all that simple, Friedman retracts. It's not some fantasy the neoconservatives invented. It's not that 25 people hijacked America. You don't take such a great nation into such a great adventure with Bill Kristol and the Weekly Standard and another five or six influential columnists. In the final analysis, what fomented the war is America's over-reaction to September 11. The genuine sense of anxiety that spread in America after September 11. It is not only the neoconservatives who led us to the outskirts of Baghdad. What led us to the outskirts of Baghdad is a very American combination of anxiety and hubris. (Haaretz)

    comments: 0

    9:26AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Wed 26 Mar 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 03 26

    Last update: 26/03/03; 10:20:32 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • Demitrious Kelly: Sockets and PHP: A socket is a lot like a pipe or a hose. It is meant to have matter travel through it. This "pipe" does not care what kind of matter will go through it, going through it or already went though it. Nor does it care where the matter is coming from or where it is going to. It's only encompassing goal is to let that matter through it. You can consider a socket (on a computer) to be the pipe which carries the data through it. [via PHPDeveloper.org] (DevArticles)
    • Jean-Francois Touchette: XMLTP/L, XMLTP Light: The current implementation of XMLTP/L uses plain TCP/IP socket for transport, and the connections are persistent. In other words, once a socket connection is established, it is used for many RPC calls. This situation is different from XML-RPC, where a new HTTP connection (a new TCP/IP connection) typically is made for each RPC call. This is one of the reasons why XMLTP/L is faster than XML-RPC. (Linux Journal)
    • XMLTP/L  - "XMLTP Light": XMLTP/L or "XMLTP Light" is a lightweight RPC protocol which uses XML to encode the stream of data. It has been designed to do fast RPC calls over an intranet, within an enterprise. More specifically, the first purpose of XMLTP/L is to forward transactions (RPCs) to a database server, but, it can be used to do method calls to any server that follows the common RPC technique introduced by XML-RPC and older client/server protocols.
    • Robert Daeley: What is Epistulae?: Providing a means to combine static and dynamic content without the use of a DBMS or CMS. The filesystem is the database.
    • Callisto CMS: Callisto CMS is an XML/XSL Web-based Content Management System [1] built using Perl and AxKit . Designed for maintaining XSL-based websites, it can edit various types of XML files, and providing a WYSIWYG interface by using the site's very own XSL stylesheets. Semantic data is edited on a per-region basis, in an "offline" domain (e.g. admin.domain.com). Sites can be deployed to production webservers when changes are made. The sites are deployed transactionally, and can be deployed to multiple target webservers, again, transactionally. Multiple independant sites can be managed in one Callisto installation, and one user login can be used for several sites, if given access. 
    • Burningbird: We the Monkeys: I agree with Sean in that the W3C shouldn't be forcing pure RDF model theory on the masses; I disagree when he says to continue to use whatever, transform it, and just bung it in when it suits us to map to RDF. If we want to do the job right, let's do it right, from the beginning. Which means that at some point, we're going to have to understand how to map that data of the domain to the RDF data model. RDF must be made accessible. Unfortunately, the W3C is its own worst enemy when it comes to promoting RDF and the Semantic Web, and understanding the concerns of just plain folks when it comes to 'abstraction'. Why? Because there are no street smarts at the W3C.
    • Technorati: New! Breaking News and Hot Links : You asked for more fresh information pulledpiping hot from the blogosphere, we deliver. As we celebrate our 10 millionth link tracked, we're annouuncing two new ways to keep track of what's being talked about across the blogging world. Breaking News brings together the most relevant news stories from over 4000 news sources, and presents them in chronological order, with context and commentary from bloggers worldwide. Keep track of the news as well as the pundits, as soon as it happens. If you're interested in more than news, then Hot Links is for you. We bring together all of the newest sites, articles, and blogs that are drawing attention on the Internet, updated every 15 minutes. Expect the unexpected, but be careful to not stare too long into the Internet's id, you may find your horizons expanding. [via Joi Ito]

    Politics

    • Mark Tran: Bush fiddles with economy while Baghdad burns: (...) America relies on the rest of the world to finance its deficits. The rest of the world was happy to do so when the US economy was strong and returns were high, but investors will put their cash elsewhere if America looks weak economically. America borrows hundreds of millions of dollars from the rest of the world each day to cover its savings gap and, under George Bush, US dependence on foreign capital is set to increase. (Guardian Unlimited)
    • Peter Svensson: Al-Jazeera Site Experiences Hack Attack: Hackers attacked the Web site of Arab satellite television network Al-Jazeera on Tuesday, rendering it intermittently unavailable, the site's host said. [via peerfear.org]
    • Josef Federman: Al-Jazeera Launches Site In English: Al-Jazeera went live early yesterday with its English-language Web site -- and the Qatar-based satellite network immediately assumed a posture likely to provoke Western readers. The site (english.aljazeera.net) has promised to offer a different perspective than those of Western media and has stuck to its word. Its graphic photos of dead U.S. soldiers, pointed headlines and opinionated articles -- many of them without reporters' bylines -- will provide plenty of fodder for critics of the Middle Eastern news organization. The content is produced separately from its Arabic-language counterpart. [via blogdex] (Wall Street Journal Online)
    • Aaron Davis and Dana Hull: Bechtel to get richer in post-war Iraq: Opponents argue that the United States is effectively ``stealing'' Iraqi oil by dictating how the defeated nation spends its oil profits on reconstruction after the war and only allowing U.S. companies to profit. (Mercury News)
    • Google: http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&q=contract+post-war+Iraqi+government&btnG=Search+News
    • New-York Times Editorial: Protecting Prisoners of War: In this kind of conventional conflict it is easy for Washington to grasp its own self-interest in upholding the Geneva Convention. It has shown far less wisdom, however, in regard to the battlefield captives now being held in Guantánamo. The administration belatedly acknowledged that the convention applied to Taliban prisoners held there, though not to Al Qaeda members. But then it failed to follow the convention's procedures for determining prisoner of war status, arbitrarily declaring that no Guantánamo captives qualified. Many of these detainees are probably not legitimate P.O.W.'s. The Geneva Convention was written to protect national armies and popular resistance forces, not terrorist groups. But that is not a decision for the administration to make on its own. The convention stipulates that if the status of captives is disputed, they are entitled to some kind of due process hearing. No such hearings have been held.
    • New-York Times Editorial: Stock Exchange Follies: Al Jazeera is feisty and frequently controversial, but it does real journalism, and it is the only uncensored TV network in the Arab world. Neither London nor Washington retaliated against Al Jazeera for its decision to broadcast the pictures. Only the New York Stock Exchange has.

    comments: 0

    1:04AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Tue 25 Mar 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 03 25

    Last update: 25/03/03; 11:04:21 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • Tom Smith: Why you need your very own taxonomy.: One way to help your search engine to locate "better" matches is to add a little common-sense humanity and create a taxonomy. A taxonomy is simply a classification or an organization of related keywords or concepts. A better search engine is essential in a world where more and more people now understand what "information overload" and "being lost in hyperspace" feels like. [via zboïng!]
    • Flying Meat Software: VoodooPad : VoodooPad is like your own personal library, modeled after the WikiWikiWeb . You can jot down notes, urls, and todo lits- and have them all linked together.[via have browser, will travel]
    • methodize solutions: nntp//rss: nntp//rss is a Java-based bridge between RSS feeds and NNTP clients, enabling you to read your favorite RSS syndicated content within your existing NNTP newsreader. RSS feeds are represented as NNTP newsgroups, providing a simple, straightforward and familiar environment for news reading. [via Ben Hammersley]
    • Cruft: How TrackBack Works: Many people are confused about what exactly TrackBack is and how you use it. Here's a little explanation with pictures to help you understand. [via Roland Tanglao]
    • Mena and Ben Trott: A Beginner's Guide to TrackBack: TrackBack was first released as an open specification in August 2002. It was released as both a protocol and as a feature of Movable Type 2.2, which contained the first implementation of TrackBack. Since the true value of TrackBack only comes when many sites support it, TrackBack was always planned as an open system: a system that could be easily implemented in other weblogging tools. [via Roland Tanglao]
    • Chris Stone: Learning the Terminal in Jaguar, Part 3: Now that you have the regular maintenance cron jobs running at more reasonable times and emailing you their reports, you would probably like to know what those jobs do, and what the reports tell you. (O'Reilly Mac DevCenter)
    • Clancy Malcolm: Ten Security Checks for PHP, Part 1: This article provides five steps to help identify or avoid such security holes in applications written using PHP. (O'Reilly PHP DevCenter)
    • Ken Williams: Path::Class - Cross-platform path specification manipulation: Path::Class provides a nicer interface (nicer in my opinion, anyway) to the File::Spec functionality. File::Spec has an object-oriented interface, but the OO-ness doesn't actually buy you anything. All it does is give you a really long name for some things that are essentially function calls (not very helpful), and lets you avoid polluting your namespace with function names (somewhat helpful).

    Politics

    • Claire Cozens: NY stock exchange bans Arab TV network: A reporter for al-Jazeera, which has been criticised by the US military for its coverage of conflict, has been barred from entering the exchange while another has been ordered to return his press card. A spokesman for the NYSE said it was limiting access to "responsible" broadcasters and insisted other broadcasters had also been affected. But al-Jazeera, which has covered the New York stock market for several years, said it believed it was the only channel affected by the action and attributed the decision to its stance on the war. (Guardian Unlimited)
    • Mike Gallagher: Letter from Baghdad: Bombs and foreboding: The bombs come at any time, without warning. They wake you up brutally; the hotel room shakes violently. Some of us sleep with our boots on, just in case. (United Press International)
    • Keith M. Woods: Take Back the Language: Recapture the language with specifics and precision. "Smart" bombs are, more accurately, laser-guided or computer-guided bombs. Leave the IQ assessment to someone else. Reserve language declaring missions "surgical" for events witnessed by reporters or reliable sources. Otherwise, just describe what happened. Avoid repeated use of aggrandized mission names: Desert Shield, Desert Storm, Iraqi Freedom, Valiant Strike. They are not neutral terms. As the war escalates, as people die and buildings fall and the unpredictable future unfolds, remember that the words you use to tell the story will tell a story of their own. Make it a story of journalistic independence. Clear. Accurate. Precise. Anything but surgical. (Poynteronline)
    • Danna Harman: World and America watching different wars : American audiences are seeing and reading about a different war than the rest of the world. The news coverage in Europe, the Middle East, and Asia, reflects and defines the widening perception gap about the motives for this war. Surveys show that an increasing number of Americans believe this is a just war, while most of the world's Arabs and Muslims see it as a war of aggression. Media coverage does not necessarily create these leanings, say analysts, but it works to cement them. (csmonitor.com)
    • Aly Colón: Deciding What to Show and When: What news organizations decide about showing images of death will help or hinder the public's understanding of this war. They should avoid automatically showing, or refusing to show, such images. Journalists need to think this issue through. By doing so they will be demonstrating respect for their highest traditions and for those who turn to them for news. (Poynteronline)
    • Poynteronline: Iraq Coverage Resources
    • Oliver Burkeman: Shock tactics: One man has been watching the fearsome bombardment of Baghdad more closely than most - Harlan Ullman, the former US navy pilot who convinced Washington to embrace his 'shock and awe' tactic. He tells Oliver Burkeman why the strategy is working. (...) All of which is not to say that Ullman supports the war. Surprisingly, perhaps, he doesn't. "Where we are is where we are, and this is not a criticism and don't write it as such, but if it had been up to me I would have waited months, perhaps, to get a second resolution, when it would have been clear that Iraq had weapons of mass destruction," he says. "I don't agree with the administration view that Iraq is a clear and present danger, an imminent threat. But as we say in aviation, the three most useless things to a pilot are airspace above you, runway behind you and fuel you no longer have left in the tank." (Guardian Unlimited)
    • Brad Knickerbocker and Peter Ford: Guerrilla tactics vs. US war plan: "We are moving from shock and awe to attrition warfare," says Air Force Col. Sam Gardiner (ret.), referring to the kind of hard-slogging combat that tries to wear down an opponent. "If the pattern continues, this could be a tough fight." (csmonitor.com)
    • Zvi Bar'el: Analysis: What happened to the civil uprising against Saddam?: The significant thing as far as the psychological war is concerned, is that the Iraqi people, who listen both to Iraqi television and Western radio reports (some of them on satellite channels), can now reach the conclusion that they can relate with almost the same degree of credibility to western reports as to those emanating from their own government. (Haaretz)
    • Orna Coussin: 'It's more than exciting, Christiane': Many media critics point out that in the era of news channels, which broadcast 24 hours a day, the American people do not receive more information than they received in previous wars - the opposite is the case. Americans can find coverage that is more multilayered, including the point of view of the Iraqi people, which President Bush presumably wants to release, but for that a certain effort is required of them - they have to give up television and gather information from a few newspapers and from Internet sites. (Haaretz)
    • Jake's Radio 'Blog: On propoganda, big-pub news and editorial integrity in wartime: In my humble opinion, we cannot be truly informed unless we see the human side of this conflict, and an uninformed populace cannot effectively govern itself democratically. It's the responsibility of the press to empower us with as much information as possible, so that we can live up to the responsibility of democratic self-govenrment.
    • Mark Lawson: Military mind games: Yet when asked to explain what is actually happening in these violently pretty pictures, politicians contemptously refuse to give "a running commentary", while press secretaries hide behind the sandbags of "classified" information. This trick of appearing open while being closed is also seen in the military tactic of attaching reporters to army units. It looks fantastically democratic but even the most skilled journalists risk becoming, in the jargon, "clientised": coming to share the fear, excitement and eventually triumphalism of the troops beside them. And if heaps of charred bodies should occur on either side, these "embedded" journalists will be kept well away from them. (Guardian Unlimited)

    comments: 0

    10:54AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Fri 21 Mar 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 03 21

    Last update: 21/03/03; 09:37:03 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • Sifry's Alerts: Technorati's Current Events: Technorati's got a new feature called Current Events that I just whipped up.  It is a list of the top links to "professional" news sites by bloggers in the last two hours, along with comments and analysis.  I created it because, like most people, I've been following the progress of the war, watching and reading the mass media, and I wanted to know what people out there were saying about the news. What are the most important stories?  What is real, and what is propaganda?  What is not being reported, or is being underreported?  These were the questions on my mind when I created Technorati's Current Events.  Ever since the Google purchase of Blogger , the thing that struck me as the most compelling potential new feature was the combination of Google News with Blogger users' commentary.  Perhaps they'll still do it, but I think I just beat them to it.
    • RSS.NET: RSS Version Comparison: Identifies key differences between RSS versions [via Scripting News]

    Politics

    • Lindsay Murdoch: 'Dead bodies are everywhere' ... Saddam's first martyrs lost : "Dead bodies are everywhere," a US officer reported by radio. Later in the day, the American firepower was turned on Safwan Hill, an Iraqi military observation post a couple of kilometres across the border. About six hours after US marines and their 155mm howitzer guns pulled up at the border, they opened up with a deafening barrage. Safwan Hill went up in a huge fireball and the Iraqi observation post was obliterated. "I pity anybody who's in there," a marine sergeant said. "We told them to surrender." (Sydney Morning Herald)
    • Martin Woollacott: Now Bush's doctrine of war will be put to the test: Principles of pre-emption and prevention, in the broader and indisputably justifiable sense of dealing with threats in their early stages, were the subject of much attention during the last decade. In humanitarian intervention, in preparing for crop failures, refugee flows, and natural disasters, in environmental protection, or in military planning, they are hardly objectionable. Military pre-emptive doctrine will survive Iraq, in particular if its contradictions are cleared up and if the rules for intervention are subject to genuine multilateral discussion. But in the particular form that the Bush administration has proposed it, this may prove to be a one-war doctrine, even if that war goes very well, a doctrine tailored for Iraq and only distantly relevant to other situations. (Guardian Unlimited)

    comments: 0

    9:36AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Thu 20 Mar 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 03 20

    Last update: 20/03/03; 15:50:20 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • Hivelogic: Soapbox Derby : Notes about Soapbox , a new weblog application, with comparisons to popular existing systems. [via Roland Tanglao]
    • Timothy Appnel: Developing Movable Type Plugins: In this article I will cover the MT plugin framework, its complete API, and the basics of hooking into the core systems operation and its data persistence service. (O'Reilly Network)
    • Mark Pilgrim: The Road to XHTML 2.0: MIME Types: Now here's a dirty little secret: browsers aren't actually treating your XHTML as XML. Your validated, correctly DOCTYPE'd, completely standards compliant XHTML markup is being treated as if it were still HTML with a few weird slashes in places they don't belong (like <br /> and <img /> ). (XML.com)
    • Joe Gregorio: The Comment API: Ok, there are a lot of interfaces now circulating TrackBack, Ping-Back, Post-It. All of these are a way of commenting on an item. The only thing missing from the mix is a way to do 'comments' themselves. That is where this specification enters. It is intended to be a roll-up of all the above specifications and to cover comments as well. As usual I am going to try to re-use as much prior art as possible. In this case I am going to re-use RSS 2.0 and have the payload for this type of message be an 'item' fragment from an RSS 2.0 feed.
    • Robert Daeley: Whither PHPosxom?: PHPosxom is not going away, first of all. However, my development efforts will be shifting focus from Adding Features to the more prosaic Make It Go Faster, not to mention the ever-popular Kill Bugs Dead for the next version, 0.7. Also in the works is an effort toward Localization to as many languages as possible. Thanks to the brainstorming Matt Gemmell and I have been doing lately, we've been able to come up with some cooperative plans, including not duplicating efforts between PHPosxom and Thistle.
    • terencekearns.com: skinny: skinny is a PHP script (one single file) which can make life easier for a PHP developer wishing to build an XML application. The skinny script centralises the role of parsing the XML and [optionally] transforming it with XSLT. It works by accepting a [single] URL variable which is used to "include" your file. Your file produces the XML and includes a stylesheet processing instruction identifying the location of your XSLT file. Skinny then also "include"s this XSLT file and uses it to transform the XML sourse - sending the resultant output to the HTTP user agent (web browser). [via More Like This WebLog]
    • Joe "Zonker" Brockmeier: What Can Ruby Do for the Enterprise?: Not only is Ruby moving ahead, but other languages are taking cues from it now. For example, chromatic said Ruby is having some influence on the design of Perl 6 . "Ruby has a lot of clever features that, in retrospect, make a lot of sense. They're obvious to the rest of us now. Perl 6 is learning a lot from it, and I think that's positive."
    • Brian Ingerson: For Perl Programmers : only: Introducing only.pm! only is a full featured system for installing and loading multiple versions of Perl modules. (Perl.com)
    • Tim Bray: rfc822.pm: Produces RFC822-compliant timestamps, presumably for use in RSS files. Subroutine rfc822 without arguments returns the current time, if there's an argument that's a time integer. rfc822_file takes a file name and returns the RFC822 form of its last-modified timestamp.
    • Dante Lorenso: Converting XML into a PHP data structure: I'd like to write an object in PHP that parses this XML document into a PHP data structure so that I can access the data like any other PHP data instead of having to write a custom parser each time I use XML in an application. (PHPBuilder)
    • Marc's Voice: Notetaker's Scott Love on OneNote and competition: So Scott HAS to get onto the PC platform - so THEN he can be competition for OneNote. Until then - he sounds like a hardware salesman for Apple - rather than a leader in the world of structured editing tools. -> I don't see why he need to port Notetaker to Windows. Yes, the pitch against its competitor on Windows is hard to swallow. But other than that, if he is not Microsoft or Adobe, he is better to develop a good app like BBEdit or NetNewsWire than try with limited resources to port its app on Windows. Marc give UserLand as an example. Well sorry Marc, Frontier and Radio just feel like unfinished products on OS X. Although its great that they can run on 2 platforms, they are plagued with a lot of GUI glitchs and limitations on OS X. Just start your copy of Frontier 4.2.3 to get the feel of a well mature app and compare it to Frontier now. [via Roland Tanglao]
    • enygma: Community News: The Demise of Wrox?: I can tell you that they've suspended all payments as of right now, and there is a grass roots movement underway to try to recoup some of the funds that were promised to the authors for their works. Of course, there's all sorts of resources out there that are talking about Wrox - so here's a few (...) (PHPDeveloper.org)
    • Accessibility.com: Accessibility-checking favelets: Show and label divs with ids, Show and label divs with classes, Alt attributes - show all, Alt attributes - images missing alt attribute (...) [via Roland Tanglao]
    • Joel Philip: Using Apache and PHP on Mac OS X: If you're running Mac OS X it has some surprises for you. Seems, PHP and the Apache Web Server have been installed on your machine without your knowledge. Well, its no secret but running them both is somewhat of a mystery and the trick is to flush them out of their hiding spots. [via PHPDeveloper.org] (DevArticles)

    Politics

    • Howard LaFranchi and Nicole Gaouette: War within the war: shaping perceptions : One challenge for the US is that negative opinion around much of the globe - and the fact the US is seen as having lost the battle of persuasion at the United Nations - means it starts with a deep deficit to make up, experts say. "The Bush administration has done such a terrible job of explaining why this has to be done, they've flitted around from one reason to another, [so] it's going to take a while to chip away the skepticism no matter what happens," says Richard Stoll, a foreign-policy expert at Rice University in Houston. "What happens in Iraq may be less important in the court of world opinion than how we got there," adds Mr. Davenport. (csmonitor.com)
    • Brad Knickerbocker: Iraq may favor a city war, Stalingrad-style: "As the Germans found at Stalingrad, city fighting reduces advantages in long-range gunnery, maneuver, armored warfare, and air power - all advantages we could have over the Iraqis but that would be diminished in their urban areas," writes Kenneth Pollack in his recent book "The Threatening Storm." "Cities are great 'levelers' in that sense," warns Mr. Pollack, a former CIA analyst who focused on the Persian Gulf. "The great question mark will be Baghdad." (csmonitor.com)

    comments: 0

    9:34AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Tue 18 Mar 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 03 17

    Last update: 18/03/03; 12:30:06 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • Brent Simmons: Greatest hits: He stops walking, just gives me that eye again. Ah nuts. The eye, the one eye, unblinking, staring. "What's that all about! What are you saying! I don't know what that means!"
    • Seb's Open Research: Personal knowledge publishing and its uses in research: In this document, I analyze an emerging form of knowledge sharing that I call personal knowledge publishing . Personal knowledge publishing has its roots in a practice known as "weblogging" that has been rapidly spreading on the World Wide Web over the last three years. It is a new form of communication that many expect will change the way people work and collaborate, especially in areas where knowledge and innovation play an important role.
    • Steven Johnson: Who Loves Ya, Baby?: No doubt you've experienced these two types of networks in your own life, many times over. The karass is that group of friends from college who have helped one another's careers in a hundred subtle ways over the years; the granfalloon is the marketing department at your firm, where everyone has a meticulously defined place on the org chart but nothing ever gets done. When you find yourself in a karass, it's an intuitive, unplanned experience. Getting into a granfalloon, on the other hand, usually involves showing two forms of ID. For most of the past 50 years, computers have been on the side of the granfalloons, good at maintaining bureaucratic structures and blind to more nuanced social interactions. But a new kind of software called social-network mapping promises to change all that. Instead of polishing up the org chart, the new social maps are designed to locate karasses wherever they emerge. [via Seb's Open Research] (Discover)
    • Seb's Open Research: Towards structured blogging: Lately I've been thinking about how we could evolve blogging tools to allow people to author more structured (dare I say semantic?) content, so that other people could find their stuff that they find of interest more easily. Right now what we have, globally speaking, is pretty much a huge pool of blog posts, each implicitly tied to a particular weblog author and with a date slapped on. Now, say I've written a review of the latest Radiohead album into my blog. I'd like others who are interested in Radiohead, or in music reviews in general, and who may not know me, to be able to pick out my review from the common pool in a simple way. Interesting people may come my way because of this. What we're talking about is getting people to put more metadata on their content. Now allowing it is one thing, and fostering it is another. And I'd say the latter is the bigger challenge.
    • AndrewSW.com: WikiBlogIntegration: Blogs log events, wikis categorize data. Neither is really great at the other. Here I discuss ways of integrating them.
    • Steve Cayzer: Semantic Blogging for Bibliographies: The central idea is to apply ideas, techniques and tools from the semantic web and apply them to blogging. Our intuition is that semantic principles can be applied to enrich and extend the blogging metaphor. We use the bibliography management domain to focus our efforts and to provide grounding for our demonstrator. However, we envisage that our efforts will be (or should be) applicable to more than just the bibliography domain. (hp labs)
    • Roland Piquepaille: More Social-Network Mapping Tools
    • David P. Janes: Janes' Blogosphere EntryTrack: EntryTrack tracks cross-blog conversations, "threads", as they're called. If any blog entry references another, they go together into a single thread, arranged by posting time and hierarchically as necessary. [via Roland Tanglao]
    • Antoine Neron: The Real Tragedy of the Commons: Social networks are an integral part of any community. Not only do they enable collective action, people generally feel more whole and complete when they associate with others who are like themselves. This is an important aspect to remember -- that it's not about using new technology, but about augmenting our ability to connect with other people and create meaningful relationships in a variety of ways. [via Karl Dubost]
    • peerfear.org: Measuring Reputation for the Internet: These blog "popularity" sites are very useful right now because a lot of the people that blog are interested in the same subjects. As the blogging community grows I think we are going to notice that the results will become less and less interesting. What we will end up with is a list of sites that mirror popular subjects but with no interesting perspective. We will also see a lot of SPAM which I think is inevitable without reputation systems.
    • David Davies' Weblog: Here are some more RSS search engines (...)
    • PerfectXML.com: XML for Web Developers - in 500 words or less!: Recently, Andrew Watt (author of the book Sams Teach Yourself XML in 10 Minutes ) started an interesting discussion thread on XML-DEV mailing list. The topic was to describe XML in 500 words or less to an "ordinary" Web developer (who has no formal Computer Science training). [via More Like This WebLog]
    • Berkeley DB XML: A personal weblog about the development of Berkeley DB XML. Authored by John Merrells, an employee of Sleepycat Software. [via More Like This WebLog]
    • Dan Benjamin: Hands on X11: For now, however, we will focus on the X11's networking and "application sharing" capabilities. In order for these examples to work, you'll need either another Mac OS X system running X11 or a Linux (or some other Unix) system with an X11 distribution already installed. (O'Reilly MacDevCenter.com)
    • peerfear.org: NewsMonster NOT supported on OSX: NewsMonster is no longer supported on OSX due the recent disabling of Java and XPI (Cross-Platform Installer) in Mozilla 1.3. NewsMonster is also not supported on pre-1.3 versions due to bugs present in all CFM builds of Mozilla.
    • MP3 Sushi: MP3 Sushi Server allows you to turn your Mac into a Jukebox or a Radio broadcast station in a few clicks. It's a cool way to share and stream your music among a local network or the Internet. [via Ben Hammersley]

    Politics

    • Chris McGreal: Israeli wall to encircle Palestine: Ariel Sharon has told his cabinet that he plans to extend the "security fence" Israel is building along the length of the West Bank so that it entirely encircles any Palestinian state. The revelation, which follows the Israeli government's decision to oppose full independence for Palestine in favour of a state with "certain attributes of sovereignty", immediately drew fire from the Palestinians who accused the Israeli prime minister of trying to turn the occupied territories into a huge prison. (...) Jeff Halper, a respected documenter of Israeli expansion in the occupied territories, said it was hard to justify building a wall through the Jordan valley as a protection against terrorism. "If you're talking in terms of terrorism from the Palestinian side, there's not much to attack in the Jordan valley. It's not like the wall on the other side where you've got Israel," he said. "So it's hard not to conclude that they are using the wall to create a de facto border that basically reduces the West Bank to the 45% or 50% that Sharon is talking about giving the Palestinians, all truncated." (Guardian Unlimited)
    • Fareed Zakaria: The Arrogant Empire : There are many specific ways for the United States to rebuild its relations with the world. It can match its military buildup with diplomatic efforts that demonstrate its interest and engagement in the world's problems. It can stop oversubsidizing American steelworkers, farmers and textile-mill owners, and open its borders to goods from poorer countries. But above all, it must make the world comfortable with its power by leading through consensus. America's special role in the world--its ability to buck history--is based not simply on its great strength, but on a global faith that this power is legitimate. If America squanders that, the loss will outweigh any gains in domestic security. And this next American century could prove to be lonely, brutish and short. (Newsweek)
    • Dan Murphy: Moderate Muslims fear fundamentalist backlash from war: It's no accident that Osama bin Laden calls his organization "The World Islamic Front for Jihad Against Jews and Crusaders" more often than he calls it "Al Qaeda." Imam Samudra, a confessed leader of the Al Qaeda-linked cell that blew up two Bali nightclubs last October, cited everything from the US invasion of Afghanistan to sectarian violence in India as evidence of a US-led war against Islam and justification for the attack. Now, Dr. Tan says, Iraq will be added to that list, since the US has failed to convince the global Muslim community that a planned invasion of Iraq is justified. "This could add to the reservoir of revenge sentiment and a rise in anti-Americanism (csmonitor.com)
    • David E. Sanger: Bush's Doctrine for War: Mr. Bush's speech almost certainly confirmed some of the world's worst fears about George Bush's America: that when the United Nations will not bend to its will, when allies will not go along, Mr. Bush will simply break away and pull the trigger. (New-York Times)
    • New-York Times Editorial: War in the Ruins of Diplomacy: The hubris and mistakes that contributed to America's current isolation began long before the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. From the administration's first days, it turned away from internationalism and the concerns of its European allies by abandoning the Kyoto Protocol on global warming and withdrawing America's signature from the treaty establishing the International Criminal Court. Russia was bluntly told to accept America's withdrawal from the Antiballistic Missile Treaty and the expansion of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization into the territory of the former Soviet Union. In the Middle East, Washington shortsightedly stepped backed from the worsening spiral of violence between Israel and the Palestinians, ignoring the pleas of Arab, Muslim and European countries. If other nations resist American leadership today, part of the reason lies in this unhappy history.
    • Paul Krugman : Things to Come: Victory in Iraq won't end the world's distrust of the United States because the Bush administration has made it clear, over and over again, that it doesn't play by the rules. Remember: this administration told Europe to take a hike on global warming, told Russia to take a hike on missile defense, told developing countries to take a hike on trade in lifesaving pharmaceuticals, told Mexico to take a hike on immigration, mortally insulted the Turks and pulled out of the International Criminal Court -- all in just two years. (New-York Times)
    • Leander Kahney: Media Watchdogs Caught Napping: In the run up to a conflict in Iraq, foreign news websites are seeing large volumes of traffic from America, as U.S. citizens increasingly seek news coverage about the coming war. "Given how timid most U.S. news organizations have been in challenging the White House position on Iraq, I'm not surprised if Americans are turning to foreign news services for a perspective on the conflict that goes beyond freedom fries," said Deborah Branscom, a Newsweek contributing editor, who keeps a weblog devoted to media issues. [via Padawan.info] (Wired)

    comments: 0

    12:16PM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Mon 17 Mar 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 03 17

    Last update: 17/03/03; 16:16:15 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • Doc Searls, David Sifry: Building with Blog: Below is the text of the Linux Journal cover story that Doc Searls and I wrote for the February issue. -> My review of this major article is here. [via Sifry's Alerts]
    • Micah Alpern: Using Weblogs to Improve Search: Until the semantic web arrives the best method we have to understand a users point of view is to examine the RSS feeds they subscribe to. [via Sifry's Alerts]
    • Internet Alchemy Weblog: BIO: A vocabulary for biographical information: This document describes a vocabulary for describing biographical information about people, both living and dead. It has been designed to be compatible with both RDF and non-RDF XML formats such as FOAF, RSS 1.0 and RSS 2.0. It contains terms useful for finding out more about people and their backgrounds and has some cross-over into genealogical information. [via Ben Hammersley]
    • BLOG Patrol: Comprehensive site statistics for your web log...free. [via Roland Tanglao]
    • Ben Hammersley: RSS 0.91, 0.92 and 2.0 Really Simple Syndication (PDF): Sample Chapter of Content Syndication with RSS
    • Steve Ivy: Corporate Product Support: The Weblog Generation: What I see happening now is that the conversations between customers and developers are growing beyond the confines of the mailing list and into the open, on the web - onto weblogs. Mailing lists are not being replaced - they're being augmented by the loosely-joined public interactions between the weblogs. (redmonk.net)
    • Jon Udell: Technical trends bode well for KM: What k-loggers do, fundamentally, is narrate the work they do. In an ideal world, everyone does this all the time. The narrative is as useful to the author, who gains clarity through the effort of articulation, as it is to the reader. But in the real-world enterprise, most people don't tend to write these narratives naturally, and the audience is not large enough to inspire them to do it. [via zboïng!] (infoWorld)
    • Sifry's Alerts: Zen and the Art of Bugfixing: I dug into the MySQL manuals , and found an interesting log file configuration parameter - the " log-slow-queries " configuration file.  By turning this on, I started to collect a log of all of the queries that took a long time to process - observations for my scientific method log book.  I also delved deep into MySQL's analysis tool, called the " EXPLAIN " command.  Using it, I could find out why a certain query was taking a long time; was it hogging the CPU?  Was it chewing through disk accesses?  Was it not using a database index?  This was my experimental playground.  Given enough observations (slow queries), I could run them through my test scenarios (individual explanations) and see what happened as I performed experiments on the database.
    • MySQL: MySQL Newsletter Survey 2003: Help us to make MySQL even better. [via Truer Words]
    • Colby How-To: Roman Alphabet Diacritics and Characters [via Roland Tanglao]
    • phpLens: Publish your data on the Web with phpLen: PhpLens is a PHP application server that allows PHP developers to quickly create database-driven web applications. With phpLens, web pages can be quickly created to present data as html tables with facilities to create ,edit ,paginate, search and delete records. [via PHP Complete]

    Politics

    comments: 0

    12:22PM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Thu 06 Mar 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 03 06

    Last update: 06/03/03; 10:42:07 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • O'Reilly Developer Weblogs : At last! An intelligent weblogs aggregator to follows all O'Reilly weblogs. [via raelity bytes]
    • More Like This WebLog: Google Request Parameters
    • PHP Everywhere: Web Services Forum: The plan calls for two parts. The first part is the Forum Server if you will. The job of the forum server is a big one. It maintains the forums posts, threads, sections, and more. It is what the second part connects to. The second part being the Forum Client. The client can be web based (initially) or GUI based. Heck, you could even create a console based application. The benefit of such a system is clearly apparent for Networked sites like the PHPDN. Right now each site directs users to a central forum on another site. This site is designed in a generic manner, and isn't based on any one sites design. -> Exactly what I'm looking for. [via PHPDeveloper.org]
    • Wrox.com: PHP String Handbook: What this book covers: regular expressions, string functions in PHP (obviously!), how PHP internally handles strings, performance of the various string handling options in PHP, character sets (ASCII, Unicode, etc.), string searching. [via PHPDeveloper.org]
    • Robert McMillan: A RESTful approach to Web services: REST relies on a single application protocol (HTTP), universal resource indicators (URI) and standardized data formats, through  XML . It employs established HTTP methods such as GET and POST to direct applications. So instead of creating a standard, machine-readable way for applications to discover and use application components on remote systems - the way SOAP is being used for Web services - REST developers use URIs to create a common ground so applications can use HTTP and XML to share data. REST developers use XML documents rather than application-method calls to tell distributed programs how to use each other's data. [via Sterling Hughes]
    • raelity bytes: Hacks: O'Reilly accompanying website for their Hacks series.

    Politics

    • New-York Times Editorial: The Worst-Case Scenario Arrives: The rupture in the Security Council is not just another bump in the road in the showdown with Iraq. It could lead to a serious, possibly fatal, breakdown in the system of collective security that was fashioned in the waning days of World War II, a system that finally seemed to be reaching its potential in the years since the end of the cold war. Whatever comes of the conflict with Iraq, the world will have lost before any fighting begins if the Security Council is ruined as a mechanism for unified international action.
    • BBC News: China rallies behind war opponents: Chinese Foreign Minister Tang Jiaxuan said he backed France, Russia and Germany, who warned on Wednesday that they will block any resolution paving the way for war with Iraq.

    comments: 0

    10:39AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Wed 05 Mar 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 03 05

    Last update: 05/03/03; 15:13:02 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • I saw Ringu DVD yesterday. Its very good. What I liked the most; the movie let you peek at Japanese homes. I always found that Japaneses are so sophisticated in the area of home living(check old Ozu movies for that too). The American movie The Ring is a remake of Ringu.
    • Benson Wong: Using PHP and XSL to Transform XML into Web Content: An introduction to XML, XSL's technologies and the Simplified DocBook DTD. How to use PHP and XSL to transform a XML document into HTML. (Zend) [via PHPDeveloper.org]
    • Poodle predictor: Poodle predictor is a tool that attempts to give you an idea of how your site will show up in the search-engine results, before it's too late, and they have already cached it.
    • Richard bennett: Poodle Predictor - See your site like Google does : ...we developed Poodle Predictor, a free tool to help web visualize what Google sees as it spiders your site, a search-engine simulator if you will. (evolt.org) [via PHPDeveloper.org]
    • MacSlash: MacSlash Interview: Brent Simmons Responds: If developers of RSS readers aren't scrupulous about following standards and limiting bandwidth consumption as much as possible then there's going to be a meltdown. Remember PointCast.
    • Sterling Hughes: To Abstract or Not To Abstract: what I think would be cool: The ability for an RSS feed to identify itself as a part of a community, and a way for a community to specify membership (specifying broad parameters or narrow parameters). That way aggregators could be specialized to deliver news within specific fields.
    • Lots of new weblog softwares!
    • Python Desktop Server Weblog: How to build your first weblog: ...the Python Desktop Server very similar in function to Radio Userland. [via Roland Tanglao]
    • The Pyrite Project: What Is Byline?: Byline is a personal weblog publishing system similar in concept to Movable Type or Greymatter. Unlike most weblog systems, Byline can operate in either a client-based or server-based mode; this means that you can run it on your own computer and let it generate files that you upload to your web site later, or you can install it directly on your site (if your server is capable) and maintain it remotely. [via Roland Tanglao]
    • jBlog PHP Weblog System: Screenshots: jBlog PHP Weblog System with all the common features (Comments, Trackbacks/Pingbacks, RSS and so on) plus cool extras like a klick 'n' blog administration interface, static pregeneration (for performance) (...) [via "Sterling Hugues"]

    Politics

    comments: 0

    11:11AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Tue 04 Mar 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 03 04

    Last update: 04/03/03; 12:38:21 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • Tim Bray: The Online Salesvoice: Ur-blogger Dave Winer is pretty assiduous in telling us about Userland's product offerings; Cluetrainers like Doc and David Weinberger are marketing their writing/speaking/punditry services. And if you direct your eyes just to the left, you'll see a big blue glowing Antarctica logo, and hey hey hey our Visual Net product is just terrif and y'all oughta tell your CIOs about it soonest! -> Me, same thing, I'm doing this for fun and attract potential clients.
    • Stuart Langridge, Ian Hickson: Pingback 1.0: Pingback is a method for web authors to request notification when somebody links to one of their documents. Typically, web publishing software will automatically inform the relevent parties on behalf of the user, allowing for the possibility of automatically creating links to referring documents. -> Very important stuff, IMO, and I wish it could be universal as the Blogger API is now (see also MetaWeblog API from UserLand). Btw, I hope Dave Winer will see this and start implementing it in its software. [via Karl Dubost]
    • Tim Bray: RSS... Oops! What?: OK, OK, sometimes it's more important to be standard than to be right, so if RSS readers have been designed with the assumption that there will be no relative links, well, that's what we should generate. But it really smells funny to me, architecturally.
    • Project Blogger: The Project Blogger network of personal sites was created to connect our clients with individuals like you who would be willing to help advance their marketing efforts. Sometimes these clients want to pick your brain through a survey. Other times, they want to take advantage of your site traffic to launch products like cell phones or new drinks. For your efforts, you get advance access to these products, cool free stuff, and yes, even hundreds of dollars in compensation. -> We like simulation!
    • Padawan.info: Googalipettes: another sneaky thing about the Google API terms of use : "you may not use the search results provided by the Google Web APIs service with an existing product or service that competes with products or services offered by Google". So, now that they absorbed Pyra and its Blogger service, what does this mean for other weblog systems, like Movable Type , which make use of the Google API? -> Important question! Is this discussed in the weblog universe?
    • Sifry's Alerts: RSS 2.0 for Popular Technorati Feeds: I had a few minutes tonight to put up the auto-generated RSS feeds for three of Technorati 's favorites: Technorati Top 100 (...) Interesting Recent Blogs (...) Interesting Newcomers.
    • MacScripter.net: Cooking with Data Types: This month, we're going to explore data types. Data types are simply the form in which information is returned from AppleScript commands. They are important because they are the key ingredients in any AppleScript recipe. -> Yikes! Where is the permalink? [via Studio Log]
    • Hey, that's nice. I have a link on the O'Reilly MacDevCenter.com pointing to my post Fun with the OS X Terminal thanks to Studio Log. Ugh, that's some circularity or what?
    • php | architect: Using PHP's CLI Interpreter: PHP 4.3.0's new CLI SAPI improves greatly on the foundation laid by its CGI ancestor. Take it for a spin - no web server required! [via PHPDeveloper.org]
    • Charles Roberts: Care and Feeding of Jaguar. OS X Drive Maintenance.: Ya still have to do a regular maintenance routine to keep things in order. The good news is that this is very simple stuff and much of it can be automated, except in the most extreme situations. [via Roland Tanglao]
    • I still want to review Joi Ito paper Emergent Democracy and I think I have finally found the main angle summarised by 2 words: Ernst Bloch. More this week I hope.

    Politics

    • Associated Press: Palestinian Killed in West Bank Shootout: Israeli troops killed one Palestinian and wounded another in an shootout at an Internet cafe in the West Bank on Tuesday, the army said. (...) An 18-year-old Palestinian in the cafe also was killed after he threw a firebomb at troops, the army said. Seven wanted Palestinians were arrested. (...) On Monday, Israel stepped up its campaign against Hamas, arresting a political leader of the violent Islamic group during a raid into a Gaza refugee camp in which eight Palestinians were killed - a pregnant woman, two boys, ages 14 and 16, and five Palestinian gunmen. (Guardian Unlimited)
    • Bradley Burston: Background / Deadly equation: Aimless in Gaza: According to Haaretz military correspondent Amos Harel, "The orders from these operations come from high up, from Sharon and from Mofaz. They often appear to stem from broader political situations, rather than the purely military. As difficult as it often is to discern civilians from combatants, civilian casualties run to about 30 percent of the total. (Haaretz)
    • Scott Peterson: Iraq: Saladin to Saddam : But overcoming the anti-US hurdle won't be easy, if the lessons from the British colonial example are anything to go by. The high profile American role itself could be an issue. "If you want to drive Iraqi resentment toward any administration, then put as many Americans as you can in Iraq," warns Toby Dodge, an Iraq expert at Britain's University of Warwick. "That would be the easiest way to fuel the growth of militant and angry Iraqi nationalism." Ticking off the history lessons relevant to Americans, he says: Don't rely on friends that you think are influential but are not - such as long-term exiles who oppose Hussein's regime, but many of whom have been outside the country for decades. "And the British dominated Iraq by bombing its population into submission," says Mr. Dodge. "You can argue that they never established a viable political order because of their addiction to air power." (csmonitor.com)

    comments: 0

    9:42AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Mon 03 Mar 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 03 03

    Last update: 03/03/03; 14:49:19 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • EXCLUSIVE!: First picture of Emmanuel M. Décarie ever published on the Net!
    • Radio Babylon: So good! Old funk, some Clash (Sandinista), high dub Reggae, "You've got me moving. You've got me grooving. Don't stop the music! Yeaaaaaah!"
    • Nice short date today: 03/03/03.
    • David A. Vise: AOL Aims to Cash In on Instant Messenger Success: "The business opportunity for instant messaging is something that is growing every day," said Michael Gartenberg, Jupiter's director of research. (Washington Post)
    • DJ's Weblog: 'Conneg' and the duality of weblogs: I've pondered the relationship between weblog and RSS before , and in an Old Speckled Hen -induced philosophical state of mind, have decided for experimental purposes that for all URI intents and purposes they are one and the same. With that in mind, my thoughts turned (naturally) to connection negotiation, or 'conneg'. My weblog, whether HTML or RSS, is my weblog. Same thing, different representation. So perhaps both representations should actually have the same URI, http://www.pipetree.com/qmacro [via A Frog in the Valley]
    • peerfear.org: Mozilla on OSX - brain dead : Talk about brain dead. Mozilla on OSX is very schizophrenic. No wonder NewsMonster has so many problems!
    • Timing: The Coming Power Shift: Attended the recent Instant Messaging Planet conference in Boston this week. A number of interesting interactions, but of the few that really stand out, David Gurle's keynote was the most far-sighted. In particular, his comments on the "coming power shift" in the instant messaging world are spot on. His contention is that users and enterprises should own the identifiers used to designate individuals in the instant messaging metaverse. A screenname like "stoweboyd@aworkingmodel.com" should not be owned by AOL, MSN, or Yahoo -- which is how things are rigged right now. I, or A Working Model, should control that URL. [via A Frog in the Valley]
    • Oliver Becker, Paul Brown, Petr Cimprich: An Introduction to Streaming Transformations for XML: SAX is the event-oriented sibling of the DOM API. (...) STX provides a streaming analog for XSLT by adopting some of the now familiar concepts from XSLT (e.g., matching based on templates and an XPath 1.0 -like expression language) but using SAX as the underlying interface to the XML document. (...) STX is neither a general purpose XML transformation language, nor is it an attempt to improve, extend, or replace XSLT. [via Karl Dubost] (xml.com)
    • Free XML Tools: XML tools by category [via Karl Dubost]
    • Charles Ross: The Object of Programming--Part 2: ...another advantage of object oriented programming is the concept of inheritance, where a new object can inherit all of the properties and handlers of an existing object, can modify them as needed, or even overwrite them completely [via Studio Log] (ATPM)
    • Surgical Diversions: wipeCloud: This script will delete all items from your cloud space. After it has completed running you will see 100% space available in the Cloud Status section of your Status Center. (Radio UserLand)
    • OSWD : Open Source Web Design is a community of designers and site owners freely sharing designs as well as design information. [via A Frog in the Valley]
    • SpellCheck: Free Online Spell Checker [via Roland Piquepaille]

    Politics

    • BBC News: Global aid call for Iraq refugees : Carol Bellamy, the head of the UN children's agency Unicef, said about two million refugees are likely to flee from Iraq if there is a war, and more will be displaced inside Iraq. Speaking on the BBC's Talking Point programme on BBC World Service and BBC News Online, Ms Bellamy said that governments had been slow to provide funds to cope with any humanitarian crisis in the region. "There's been virtually no money... to any of the humanitarian agencies so far," she said. "As things stand right now, it is almost entirely self-financed, which means taking money away from places like Sierra Leone or Afghanistan or Somalia or Colombia, and those are crises as well."
    • Guardian Unlimited: Web watched: Human rights groups say that Iran has more journalists in prison than any other Middle Eastern country, but its internet media is more vibrant and critical than counterparts in most of the region.

    comments: 0

    9:19AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Sun 02 Mar 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 03 02

    Last update: 02/03/03; 12:38:38 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • Ben Hammersley: Announcing Weblog Hacks: ...this is so new it's not even on the official site yet - we can announce my new book for O'Reilly , and it's one you're invited to contribute to... Ladies and Gentlemen, Boys and Girls, give it up for: Weblog Hacks
    • 0xDECAFBAD: Agent Frank: Amongst Agent Frank's facilities are network proxies that can be placed between local clients and remote servers. Using these, Agent Frank can tap into the user's online activities in order to monitor, archive, analyze, and alter information as it flows. For example, using a web proxy, Agent Frank can log sites visited, analyze content, filter out ads or harmful scripting. [via Ben Hammersley]
    • Jonathon Delacour: My brush with academia: I used also to loathe post-modernists and post-structuralists, for the way they ripped the heart out of art practice, taking something I loved almost as much as life itself, and trampling it into a noxious slurry concocted from fear, ambition, hatred, French theory, and PC claptrap mixed with generous portions of their own shit, piss, and vomit.

    comments: 0

    12:22PM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Sat 01 Mar 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 03 01

    Last update: 01/03/03; 15:30:02 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • Bryan Chaffin: Microsoft: We Have No Plans To Remove Linux Support From Virtual PC For Mac: Tim McDonough, director of Marketing and Business Development for Microsoft's Macintosh Business Unit, told us point blank that " Microsoft has no current plans to remove Linux support within Virtual PC for Mac. " While not a promise of Linux support forever, it is the first indication of Microsoft's plans for this aspect of Virtual PC for the Mac since the acquisition was announced. [via Linux Today] (Mac Observer)
    • Google Village: Google Trademark Issue: Kill Spontaneity or Risk Trademark Abuse: This site, Google Village, also has a job to adhere to Google's rules; this is one of the last days you will see the heading Google Village on this weblog site. This site will be renamed and will sometime soon be available from a new domain.
    • Well this blog is mostly read by NetNewsWire. Perusing at the access_log, and going by distinct hosts, NetNewsWire still the king.
    • Sterling Hughes: Social Contracts: ...you have commercial development, which fosters a strong separation between the user and developer communities. In such communties, the vendor has a greater responsibility because the users have less rights. Most open source communities probably fall somewhere in the middle.
    • Phillip Pearson: The Internet Topic Exchange: This is the first public implementation of the Ridiculously Easy Group Forming concept. It's a central server to host TrackBack-powered channels. It's designed to let anyone effortlessly create a channel to archive pointers to information on a given topic.
    • Joi Ito: blacklists and databases of travelers: I wonder if this blog post increases my "threat level"...
    • Daring Fireball: Not Dead Yet: Bare Bones has changed their policy (or at least clarified it): while BBEdit Lite is no longer being developed or supported, it is still available, legally, and apparently always will be.

    Politics

    • Zvi Bar'el: Nightmare scenarios for all: "In place of a northern front of the Afghanistan type, a front that will help the Americans seize control of the country, the U.S. is liable to encounter a Kurdish northern front that will make its life hell," says a Turkish commentator. "Instead of liberating Baghdad, the Americans will be forced to act as a separation force between Turkey and Kurdistan." (Haaretz)
    • BBC News: Turkey upsets US military plans : The motion - if passed in a subsequent vote scheduled on 4 March - would also authorise the government to send Turkish troops to Kurdish-populated northern Iraq in the event of war. The US urgently wants to deploy 62,000 troops and more than 250 planes in Turkey as part of its military plans. Turkey could send twice as many troops to northern Iraq. -> Anyone find scary that the US will let the Turks handle the the Kurds? Are the US letting the Turks have their own satrapies in Northern Iraq?
    • Nicholas D. Kristof: Secret, Scary Plans : There's nothing wrong with planning, or with brandishing a stick to get Kim Jong Il's attention. But several factions in the administration are serious about a military strike if diplomacy fails, and since the White House is unwilling to try diplomacy in any meaningful way, it probably will fail. The upshot is a growing possibility that President Bush could reluctantly order such a strike this summer, risking another Korean war. (New-York Times)
    • Tim Bray: Iraq Rant: As of this Saturday morning, apparently the US now insists on a regime change as a condition of avoiding war. This is arguably more moral than the silly idea that Saddam is a major threat to the world; and it might have worked if they'd started out that way. But it's not what resolution 1441 says, so this is not exactly going to help their chances in the Security Council. For example, this morning Jean Chrétien, our Prime Minister, said "If you start changing regimes, where do you stop? This is the problem. Who is next? Give me the list. It is the disarmament that is important here." And Jean is not exactly a shit-disturber in the Chirac style, so this kind of thing is significant.

    comments: 0

    8:50AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Fri 28 Feb 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 02 28

    Last update: 28/02/03; 15:18:27 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • The Blogger Team: Blogger + Google F.A.Q. (BLOGGER)
    • Tim Bray: Howdy: Dave claims to have the oldest blog, well for a few minutes on 2003/02/27, this is the youngest!. [via Jon's Radio]
    • Google Village: Can Google Expunge the Verb: Therefore, you cannot google someone if you use AllTheWeb, or MSN Search. To google someone you must use Google[trademark].
    • Analog is drawing a cute pizza graph for this blog log.
    • The Rookery: Synchronizing FTP Files with Perl: In order to execute the synchronization, the script collects information from two filesystem trees, one local and one remote. I chose to collect all the information from both trees and perform the synchronization later. In my experience, this translates to cleaner and more maintainable code than if I tried to do everything in one pass. -> Interesting, I always though that it could be nice to see how Radio UserLand compare to Perl when scanning the filesystem. My hypothesis being that a cron Perl job to scan the Radio web folder and trigger an event send to Radio might be more efficient than the present scanning made by Radio.
    • Joi Ito: Joi Ito's Moblog alpha.2 version
    • Usable Help: Using background images in Mac OS X: With these few steps, you're well on your way to helping your customers get started with well-placed, attractive, and easy-to-follow instructions. Developers are just beginning to tap into this capability, and while certainly not perfect, with a little thought and focus you can improve your customer's initial experience with your product. [via: Roland Tanglao]
    • Larisa Thomason: Build Your Site Navigation With CSS: our goal in this tutorial is to build a colorful, attractive text-based navigation system without the use of images.[via PHPDeveloper.org] (sitepoint)
    • Gijs van Tulder: PHP frontend to ImageMagic: You've got an image: http://wwww.example.com/img/image.jpg . You copy the ImageMagick script magick.php to the same directory. The image is now also available as http://www.example.com/img/magick.php/image.jpg . So far, your image hasn't changed. Now, imagine you want a thumbnail of the image with a width of exactly 200 pixels. You can get that image by requesting the url: http://www.example.com/img/magick.php/image.jpg?resize(200). [via PHPDeveloper.org] (evolt.org)
    • mhenders: Use PHP as a scripting language in BBEdit (Mac OS X Hints)

    Politics

    • Anonymous: If antiwar protesters succeed: It got me wondering: What if you antiwar protesters and politicians succeed in stopping a US-led war to change the regime in Baghdad? What then will you do? Will you also demonstrate and demand "peaceful" actions to cure the abysmal human rights violations of the Iraqi people under the rule of Saddam Hussein? Or, will you simply forget about us Iraqis once you discredit George W. Bush? (csmonitor.com)

    comments: 0

    11:22AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Thu 27 Feb 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 02 27

    Last update: 27/02/03; 19:10:30 EDT

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • Jay Docherty: Advice for Buying a Linux-Compatible Laptop: Buying a fully Linux compliant laptop can be a truly harrowing experience. (Linux Journal)
    • MailEdit: MailEdit Documentation (Radio UserLand)
    • David Davies: Mobile blogging how-to guide: Mobile blogging is easy. Don't let anyone tell you different. All you need is a mobile device such as a mobile phone or a wireless lap/palm top. In fact it doesn't matter what hardware you've got as the important thing is it must be able to send an email message. Most mobile phone service providers will either let you send an email directly from your phone or they'll operate an SMS > email gateway where you send an SMS message to a special access number that in turn routes your message out to email. -> See above for a probably simpler solution for Radio UserLand [via Scripting News & Roland Tanglao]
    • Ken Dow: Shorthand Plug-In Documentation: The ShortHand plugin makes it even easier to Edit This Page in Manila by handling many common formatting tasks without requiring HTML. Emphasis, headings, bulleted and numbered lists, horizontal rules and more can be created without HTML. Shorthand complements Manila - Shortcuts, Pictures, Gems and all the other Manila features continue to work. (Manila)
    • Paul Everitt : An Introduction to Structured Text: Wouldn't it be nice if there was a non-tag, text-oriented system for engineers to express semantic meaning? This is the problem Structured Text tackles. With Structured Text, format-independent writing becomes extremely convenient and natural, once a few rules are learned. Furthermore, Structured Text can be extended to cover advanced and customed uses.
    • Jan Erik Moström : TextWrangler : BBEdit is my favorite text editor, it has all the functionality of TextWrangler and much more, so there is little chance that I will switch from BBEdit to TextWrangler ... but, if I didn't own BBEdit and needed a rock solid, affordable text editor that I could use from the terminal, edit files using FTP, handle various encodings, etc, TextWrangler would be my choice.
    • Ranchero Software: Big Cat 1.0 Scripts Plugin : Big Cat adds a Scripts menu when you ctrl-click in applications--such as the Finder, BBEdit, Internet Explorer, and Eudora--that support system contextual menus.
    • Popdex: the website popularity index.
    • Dave Ward : MacLorem 2.0: MacLorem generates random filler text for artists, graphic designers, typesetters and others who need to generate mock-ups or spec art for clients, publishers or employers.
    • Jeremy Zawodny: The 10 Habits of Highly Annoying Bloggers: For a long time I've known that some things have bugged me about certain blogs and/or bloggers. This is my attempt to collect them in a top-10 list. [via Roland Tanglao]
    • Caroline White: News feeds to reshape the web : But perhaps the biggest potential impact of news readers is the prospect that they will further level the playing field between Big Media and individual content creators... [Via Ranchero Software] (journalism.co.uk)
    • Dejan Bosanac: PHP Iterator: PHP arrays are generally a very powerful object container. But still, we can easily add a little more fuel to them. Imagine an iterator object as a kind of wrapper around our arrays. What we will try to accomplish here is to create unique interface for traversing arrays and to add a little more control over how our objects are created and finally, to support lazy loading. (PHPBuilder)
    • Simon Willison: SafeHtmlChecker.class.php: The system I have implemented works by running submitted posts through an XML parser, which checks that each element is in my list of allowed elements, is nested correctly (you can't put a blockquote inside a p for example) and doesn't have any illegal attributes. My initial test have shown it to work pretty well, but if anyone wants to have a go at breaking it please, be my guest. [via Karl Dubost]

    Politics

    • Susan B. Glasser : Democracy in Kuwait Is Promise Unfulfilled : Despite the prospect of another U.S.-led war against Iraq, one that President Bush says will foster democratization throughout the Middle East, many Kuwaitis look skeptically to the example of their own country. (Washington Post)
    • Laurie Kassman: Relief Agencies Prepare for War in Iraq: David McLachlan-Karr of the U.N. Humanitarian Affairs Office underlines the vulnerability of Iraq's 24 million citizens who have already suffered the effects of 12 years of economic sanctions, the massive resources diverted to Iraq's costly military build-up and two wars in the past 20 years. "Iraq is a very vulnerable population," he said. "One million children under five are considered to be chronically malnourished. Five million Iraqis lack regular access to safe water and sanitation. Sixty percent of the country is actually dependent on the government for food and to meet their household needs, which means any disruption will have an immediate affect." (Voice of America)
    • Neve Gordon: War on Iraq will intensify Palestinian suffering : The people in the room remembered that during the Gulf War the international media concentrated on Scud missiles falling on Tel Aviv, while ignoring the suffering of the occupied Palestinians. They recalled that in 1991 the Israeli government imposed a 40-day curfew on all the major cities in the occupied territories, subjecting the population to massive collective punishment. The Palestinian economy was in much better shape then than it is today; this time around, with the majority of Palestinians living on less than $2 a day, a prolonged curfew will undoubtedly lead to widespread hunger.

    comments: 0

    1:36PM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Wed 26 Feb 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 02 26

    Last update: 27/02/03; 01:04:51 EDT

    Politics

    • Jesse Jackson: Media give Bush free pass to Iraq: By echoing rather than challenging the administration's distortions, by failing to report what is going on in the region, by failing to let Americans understand why much of the world opposes the war on Iraq, the media are compounding the president's error. It is allowing him to get away without sharing why he's made the choices he has made. [via RatcliffeBlog] (Chicago Sun-Times)
    • Louisa Lim: US media's war challenge: Large sections of the media seem to see their role as preparing the US for war. Much less time is spent questioning the reasons and examining the consequences of any military action. [via RatcliffeBlog] (BBC News)
    • Paul Krugman : Threats, Promises and Lies: The funny thing is that this administration sets great store by credibility. As the justifications for invading Iraq come and go -- Saddam is developing nuclear weapons; no, but he's in league with Osama; no, but he's really evil -- the case for war has come increasingly to rest on credibility. You see, say the hawks, we've already put our soldiers in position, so we must attack or the world won't take us seriously. [via blogdex] (New-York Times)
    • George Monbiot: Out of the wreckage: The US is planning to build a new generation of nuclear weapons in order to enhance its ability to launch a pre-emptive attack. This policy threatens both the comprehensive test ban treaty and the nuclear non-proliferation treaty - two of the principal instruments of global security - while endangering the international compact that the UN exists to sustain. (Guardian Unlimited)
    • W. Clark : The Real But Unspoken Reasons For The Iraq War: In the aftermath of toppling Saddam it is clear the U.S. will keep a large and permanent military force in the Persian Gulf. Indeed, there is no "exit strategy" in Iraq, as the military will be needed to protect the newly installed Iraqi regime, and perhaps send a message to other OPEC producers that they might receive "regime change" if they too move to euros for their oil exports. [via Phillipe "Flip" Martin] (Rense.com)
    • Doc Searls: Observations on the verge of war
    • Dave Winer: We can pay for reconstructing Iraq by pumping oil. We can also pay ourselves back for the cost of the war. -> Nothing new here, that's been the prerogative of all conquerors.

    Scripting, Blogging, Softwares...

    • Marc Canter: Proposal for Free (open source) Media Management servers: By creating what amounts to intelligent proxy and registry servers for media, on-line tools and communities can share media (within the spirit of the Creative Commons) or AT LEAST  just not have to duplicate the code that EVERYONE is gonna need for managing media. [via Karl Dubost]
    • Brian Ingerson: Have you ever wanted to make sure that use only loaded a particular version of a module? Or have you ever wanted to install several versions of a module, and easily be able to pick which one you want to load? I've written a module called only.pm to help you do just that (...) [via use Perl]
    • Daring Fireball: Wrangly: TextWrangler has no built-in support for syntax coloring in any other languages, and nor does it accept third-party BBEdit language modules . It would seem to me that way more people program using scripting languages like Perl and Python than in the C family of languages.
    • Mark Pilgrim: How to block spambots, ban spybots, and tell unwanted robots to go to hell: They come at all hours, they take as much as they can, and they leave me with the (bandwidth) bill.
    • Little Snitch 1.0.2: You start an application that tells you that a new version is available. You suddenly realize that with every start this application connects to the developer's server. Even statistics information about your computer may be sended this way. Little Snitch helps you avoid this situation. [via have browser, will travel]
    • Ranchero Software: Huevos 1.1: Huevos is a customizable search engine helper for Mac OS X. (...) You can bring Huevos to the front from within any application by typing a hotkey command--which you can change via the Preferences. No mouse required to choose a search engine: you can set command keys and use up and down arrow keys to choose a search engine.
    • Chad  Dickerson : Tools for the short hike: Although it has often been subtle, there is a level of quiet discomfort between the "scripting" versus "programming" factions in some corporate development environments in which I have participated. [via Studio Log]

    comments: 0

    1:08PM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Tue 25 Feb 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 02 25

    Last update: 26/02/03; 11:32:49 EDT

    • Matt Wade : Working with Multi-page Forms : One of the strengths of PHP is that it simplifies the retrieval of data from HTML forms. Form variables are placed in auto-globals and always available to PHP. That's great for a simple form that only encompasses one page, but what happens when you have lengthy forms that span multiple pages? Well, there are several methods you could use to cope with this. You could store information in session variables, in a database, or pass on the information using hidden fields. Today, we will spotlight a function in the Code Gallery that simplifies the last method, hidden fields, by eliminating the tedious coding of each hidden field. [via PHPDeveloper.org] (Zend)
    • Eide.org: I have made a overview of the new features that will be available when PHP5 finally arrives. [via PHPDeveloper.org] (PHP)
    • Adam C. Engst: A Personal Statement on War in Iraq: I'm sad that amid all of these concerns, which I am by no means unique in having or expressing, the Bush Administration seems either unable or unwilling to develop creative solutions to the Iraq problem. There's no question the threat of force was instrumental in restarting the weapons inspections and in galvanizing the United Nations, but there's a huge difference between a threat and wholesale war. (...) I know that this is not a video game with bonus points and extra lives, and it's not a feel-good action movie with a happy ending after the explosive special effects. Those are fantasies, and the reality is that unprovoked war with Iraq is not an end, but the beginning of a chain of events that fills me with dread. (TidBITS)
    • John Noble Wilford : War in Iraq Would Halt All Digs in Region : War in Iraq would halt archaeology not just in that country but across the Middle East, experts say, and could result in some of the earliest cities of Mesopotamia being bombed or looted into ruins of ruins. (New-York Times)
    • Glenn Kessler and Mike Allen: Bush Faces Increasingly Poor Image Overseas : Joseph Cirincione, director of the Non-Proliferation Project at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, believes world opinion shifted dramatically against Bush when, after the new year began, he signaled he was not committed to supporting continued inspections. Cirincione said U.S. allies had been relieved when Bush appeared to embrace resolving the issue through the United Nations last fall. "It now appears to be an elaborate con job," he said. "Other leaders feel manipulated and deceived." (washingtonpost.com)
    • Jonathon Delacour: What does irrevocable mean, again?: Even so, isn't it reasonable to assume that giving away your work, irrevocably, to anyone in the world, for the duration of its copyright, whether your change your mind or not, should require more than flicking a couple of switches?
    • markpasc.org: Kit 1.2.1: Kit is a suite of "page tools" for Radio UserLand 8, including Weblog search, an improved News Aggregator page, a web Quick Script, "Radio to the Past" for changing weblog items' dates, a web outline editor, a per-category weblog index, a subscribed feeds lister, file uploader, and the Kit dashboard. Kit is published under a BSD license. (Radio UserLand)
    • markpasc.org: Distributed authenticated comments : ...a system for posting comments to weblogs. Such a system would need to support: (1) Authentication. No one should be able to fake a comment as yours without causing a warning. (2) Ownership of comments. The original poster should be able to prove e's the original poster, to the point the server could allow em to edit or delete eir comments. (3) Distributed architecture. No third party besides the comment poster and the weblog software taking the comment should be necessary. (Either way could be provided as a third-party service, but it should not be necessary.) (4) Ease of use. Posting a comment should be at least as easy as posting an entry with a TrackBack ping (autodiscovery notwithstanding, I'm afraid).
    • Rahul Chauhan: Socket Programming in PERL: For now, let's sum up that a socket is an IP address and a port, enabling connection. (DevArticles)
    • Mitchell Harper : My FTP Wrapper Class for PHP : As you may or may not know, PHP's support for FTP is fantastic, however because this support comes in the form of many unstructured functions, I decided to wrap the most common ones into a class, which I call MY_FTP. (DevArticles)
    • Tyrell Software: Plone 1.0 Installer for Mac OS X: Plone hits the sweet spot, being easy to install and administer, offering advanced functionality like workflow, personalization, and internationalization, while providing a user experience that raises the bar to a new level. [via have browser, will travel]
    • Andrew B. King
    • : Speed Up Your Site: Web Site Optimization. Chapter 2: Flow in Web Design: Although flow can occur anywhere, certain activities like rock climbing, performing surgery, chess, and sailing lend themselves to this optimal state of focused attention. Responsive, well-designed web sites can also induce flow in their users. (WebReference.com)
    • lipsum.com: All the Lipsum generators on the Internet tend to repeat predefined chunks of Lipsum as necessary, making this the first true Lipsum generator on the Internet.
    • Jeff's Weblog: UserLand Booth : Believe it or not, UserLand once had a booth at the Macworld Expo and here are the pictures to prove it. (Frontier)
    • Seth Dillingham: Still No Way to Set Attributes in XML: After years of working with XML in Frontier and Radio , I still can't believe there's no built-in way to set element attributes. (Truer Words)
    • jenett.radio: Radio UserLand web ring (Radio UserLand)

    comments: 0

    10:52AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Mon 24 Feb 2003

    Quick Links - 2003 02 24

    Last update: 24/02/03; 11:29:32 EDT

    • Bill Thompson: Is Google too powerful?: Blogging is not journalism. Often it is as far from journalism as it is possible to get, with unsubstantiated rumour, prejudice and gossip masquerading as informed opinion. (BBC News)
    • Burningbird: Google is not God, Webloggers are not Capital-J Journalists, the only thing emerging is my fear of war, and a headache In the midst of what promises to be one of our more vile wars, with human warring against human in our most inhumane ways, we'll find our lone bloggers, bravely sitting at laptop with satellite phone, blogging the story so the truth will be told. I don't think so.
    • Joi Ito: Emergent Democracy -> I'll try to review it this week. My take for now: incredible shortcuts with history ("democracy" doesn't mean the same thing in Antiquity and now), the "idea of emergence" is old as the hegelian dialectic and its application by Marx, Parson, Kuhn and many others, no mention of ideology and how it is created and informed, insistance on the network as a new mean of liberation like a millenarism dream, comparing ants colonies to human societies smell like sociobiology, etc... (although I'll give a lot of credits to the author to try to do something about reforming politic).
    • Joi Ito: Long RSS items: Are long RSS items rude? More and more people are reading inside of news readers and not bothering to go to the blogs themselves. (My logs show this.) Should we put full text of the blog entry in the RSS feed, even if it's long? -> What about images?
    • markpasc.org: Footbridge: Footbridge, a lightweight tool to mirror Radio categories to Advogato, LiveJournal, and Blogger API sites
    • MacSlash: Interview: Ranchero's Brent Simmons: Quite possibly responsible for the RSS revolution on the Mac, Ranchero 's NetNewsWire Lite and Pro is largely the work of one man, Brent Simmons . MacSlash is giving you a chance to ask him questions in this forum, from RSS to NetNewsWire, to the future of the web, comment below and we'll take the top rated questions and submit them to Brent for his answer, with a few of our own in tow. Fire away! -> I think Radio UserLand started the trend but NetNewsWire went further and better.
    • Bill Venners with Frank Sommers: Strong versus Weak Typing A Conversation with Guido van Rossum, Part V: Python creator Guido van Rossum talks with Bill Venners about the robustness of systems built with strongly and weakly typed languages, the value of testing, and whether he'd fly on an all-Python plane. (artima.com)
    • David Heller: HTML's Time is Over. Let's Move On.: Ultimately, I don't see a long term future for HTML as an application development solution. It is a misapplied tool that was never meant to be used for anything other than distributed publishing. -> Radio UserLand could be well positionned here if it could come up with a rich GUI (and no, I'm not talking about the actual implementation inside a web browser). [via PHP Everywhere]
    • Karl Dubost: XHTML's Time has come. Let's Move On.: It's a long time since I have read all the complete stories of David Heller. The last time I think I stopped at the chapter HTML's Time is Over. Let's Move On. You know that's cool, because I have an RDF agent which collects his articles every time he is publishing a new essay and collect it in my own XML database. Each month, my application launches an XSL-FO stylesheet and format all the articles with a table of contents and a very nice layout. I can even choose my layout.
    • Daring Fireball: Larry, Moe, Curly: If you apply the same [BBEdit] Translate settings on a regular basis, you can skip the dialog box by creating an AppleScript to perform the translation. -> Hey, if you upstream your files via Radio UserLand, Radio will do the translation for you!
    • Pierre Igot: They Blog, You Blog, iBlog: [Radio UserLand] is not a package that is particularly Mac OS X-friendly. There are some features that simply don't work in OS X, such as the ability to use a WYSIWYG editor in Explorer for blog editing. In other words, for simple things such as formatting text in bold or italics, you need to use HTML tags manually. Radio also stores all its files (and there is a great number of them) inside the application folder itself, instead of using Mac OS X's Library folder. It doesn't support accented characters in category names. Radio also often seizes up when I try to quit it as part of a logout sequence, forcing me to force-quit it. Etc. (...) As the company claims, Radio UserLand is indeed "turning the Web into a fantastic writing environment." It still needs work when it comes to fully integrating into the unique work environment provided by Mac OS X and offering all the writing aids that a writer needs -- but it is already quite exciting as it is, and traditional Mac users such as myself, who have been itching to explore this new medium, should not hesitate to take the plunge as long as they are willing to spend a few hours learning how to use a new writing tool, and willing to put up with certain aspects that are not particularly Mac-friendly. (Applelust.com) [via Ranchero.com]

    comments: 0

    8:30AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Sun 23 Feb 2003

    Quick Links

    Last update: 23/02/03; 14:02:43 EDT

    comments: 0

    11:48AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    ZOË

    My comments system was not working yesterday for directories that are nested more than 3 levels (fixed, forgot to set the $depth value in PHPosxom to 4). So Nicholas Riley had to send me an email about ZOË instead of posting a comment. I think ZOË look very cool, but have a terrible About page, and no entry in the FAQ of the kind of "What is ZOË?" (ergo, my frustration about having trouble to understand what ZOË is). ZOË look like a really original framework, that's why in my opinion, the developer should put a lot of care and attention explaining it, and use a more concise style. Btw, ZOË is hosted by eVectors, a provider of fine Radio UserLand products.

    So what more do you want to know about Zoe? It reads your mail via
    POP, IMAP or mailbox import, acts as a SMTP proxy server so it can
    pick up your sent mail, and new in 0.4, reads your RSS feeds, saves it
    in files, indexes it for searching, cross-references it in a database,
    slices and dices, and lets you view it pretty much any way you could
    think of.  View all messages from a particular person, from a
    particular domain, on a particular date, containing words, sent to a
    mailing list, with a subject; it threads mail for you too.
    
    Or pull your mail/RSS out the other end as POP, FTP or with RSS/weblog
    protocols.
    
    That's about it.  Hugely useful, stable, intuitive for most things and
    reasonably fast considering what it's doing, but it has rather
    insanely high resource requirements (using ~250 MB RAM on my Mac at
    the moment) and doesn't always communicate errors very well.
    

    ZOË mailing list: https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/zoe-general

    comments: 0

    10:51AM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Sat 22 Feb 2003

    Quick Links

    Last update: 22/02/03; 16:08:36 EDT

    • semaview: XML vs RDF Illustrated [via Michel Dumais]
    • semaview: The Semantic Web Illustrated [via Michel Dumais]
    • I'm following everyday: Roland Tanglao' Weblog
    • Manila Plugins: hierarchyTemplates Plug-In: The hierarchyTemplates Plug-In enables additional templates for Manila sites. These templates can be associated with the URL tree. For example: If you set a new template for the path "/myprojects/latest/", all pages below this URL get rendered with that new template. Templates can be defined for whole pages or just the content area (body). It is possible to freely combine these two types. [via John Robb's Radio Weblog]
    • New Manila ISP: IdeaForest.net : "Blog" Away! Use ideaForest.net for your Weblog. Use your browser to remotely edit your site directly or Radio UserLand to edit your site remotely.
    • Zoë: Nicholas Riley review on Zoë webpage: The best way I can describe it: as Radio UserLand does for the Web, Zoë does for email. This is the program I've wanted to write for a long time: it indexes your mail (with Lucene ) and lets you do something useful with it.... Still don't understand what it does. Why some developers can't describe their product in one paragraph is beyond me.
    • cryptozoology: This page is dedicated to such animals -- commonly called "cryptids" -- which might possibly exist in nature but whose existence has not yet been accepted by modern science. [via Burningbird]
    • Wei-Meng Lee: A Quick Guide to vi (O'Reilly MacDevCenter.com)
    • Mecca-Cola : Don't drink stupid!: Mecca Cola challenges US rival (BBC News)
    • New-York Times: with the precision-guided munitions used in the Afghan war, some human rights groups estimate that more than 1,000 civilians died -- twice as many as in the Kosovo war, and about one-third as many as in the 1991 gulf war. (New-York Times)
    • Guardian: A Guardian report in February estimated these casualties at between 1,300 and 8,000 deaths. A Guardian investigation into the "indirect victims" now confirms the belief of many aid agencies that they exceeded the number who died of direct hits. As many as 20,000 Afghans may have lost their lives as an indirect consequence of the US intervention. They too belong in any tally of the dead. (Guardian Unlimited)
    • Guardian: Archbishop of Canterbury: Both President Bush with his "axis of evil" soundbites and the prime minister in his recent campaign to provide a moral justification for the conflict have become increasingly messianic in tone as they strive to persuade sceptical electorates, he said."There is no war that is holy and good in itself and to bring the heavy artillery of a religious kind, to say that is the only way of resisting evil, is something that has to be watched out for." (Guardian Unlimited)

    comments: 0

    12:41PM EST [ /Internet/Blogging/QuickLinks | # ]

    Fri 21 Feb 2003